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John Dorsey

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April 14, 2008
Before there were blogs or podcasts or online chats, Baltimore journalist John Dorsey, who died Friday at age 69, made his mark the old-fashioned way -- by sheer dint of the written word. During four decades as a feature writer and critic for The Sunday Sun and The Sun, his writing had an impact not because it was instantaneous but because it was enduring. And, yet, he brought something new to the paper -- a fresh eye on art, a different way of looking at Baltimore's emerging restaurant scene and its changing urban landscape.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
Readers turned to his essays on Baltimore's restaurants with their morning coffee in the 1970s - often before reading the main news. A decade later, his learned criticism forged interest in Baltimore's artistic community and drew audiences to little-known studios and galleries. Newspaper patrons recognized that the familiar byline, John Dorsey, and what he had to say could irritate, chide or praise. They also knew his prose was readable, clear and full of precise opinions. Mr. Dorsey died yesterday of Lou Gehrig's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, from which he had suffered for nearly four years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Morris Martick, the colorful restaurateur who ran a Baltimore landmark for nearly four decades, died of lung cancer early Friday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 88. Friends said he collapsed while walking on Howard Street last month. He had continued to reside at 214 W. Mulberry St., where he was born and his parents had a grocery store that he later turned into his French restaurant Known for his sweet potato soup and bouillabaisse, he charmed regular customers in a bohemian atmosphere at what he named Martick's Restaurant Francais.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
ONE OF Howard County's oldest structures, an 18th-century manor house known as Dorsey Hall, will be restored as part of a $3.5 million office center scheduled to open early next year. Howard County Executive James N. Robey joined developers Richard Talkin and Donald Reuwer on Tuesday to break ground for the project, called the Dorsey Hall Manor Executive Offices. The development, at 5100 Dorsey Hall Drive in Columbia, will include the construction of 32,000 square feet of office space in four two-story buildings.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck 'Summer Skies' are on the walls at Steven Scott Gallery | August 7, 1994
Playwrights Festival presents sixth play by Towson lawyerIn the 13-year history of the Baltimore Playwrights Festival, no playwright has had more scripts produced than Robert R. Bowie Jr., a Towson lawyer whose sixth festival production, "Between the Lines," opens Friday at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St.Bowie's new play focuses on a husband and wife, beginning in the present, flashing back to their days at a progressive Baltimore high school...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | July 31, 1994
Recital features Baltimore baritoneAugust is typically a dead time for classical music in this burg. But music lovers -- especially those partial to vocal music -- need not despair. Eric Greene, a talented young baritone who studied with Jean Carter until his graduation in 1992 from the Baltimore School for the Arts, will give a recital Saturday at 7 p.m. at the Morgan Christian Center at Morgan State University (Cold Spring Lane and Hillen Avenue). Greene is now in his third year at the Juilliard School in New York and has already won important national prizes, including a bronze medal in the Rosa Ponselle Young Artists Competition.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 11, 1993
'Barefoot in the Park' will play at Western Maryland CollegeBeginning Friday, Theatre on the Hill will present "Barefoot in the Park," Neil Simon's 1963 comedy about newlyweds living in a New York walk-up. Brian Jacobs and Bonnie Webster portray the uptight bridegroom and his free-spirited bride. Direction is by Josh Selzer.Performance dates are Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and on July 22, 23, 24 and Aug. 1, 4, 5, 8, 11 and 12. Curtain time is 7 p.m. on Sundays and 8 p.m. on all other days. Tickets are $11. Theatre on the Hill performs in Alumni Hall at Western Maryland College, 2 College Hill, Westminster.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 9, 1994
Revenge, lust and great music in 'Rigoletto'Verdi's "Rigoletto" is one of the high-water marks of the operatic genre: tuneful, full of sentiment and structured so that it drives to its tragic conclusion with the force of a river rushing to a precipice. This classic tale of lust and revenge opens the Baltimore Opera Company's current season at the Lyric Opera House with performances Oct. 15 (8:15 p.m.), Oct. 19 (7:30 p.m.), Oct. 21 (8:15 p.m.) Oct. 22 (8:15 p.m.) and Oct. 23 (3 p.m.). The cast for the Oct. 15, Oct. 19, Oct. 21 and Oct. 23 performances will feature Mark Rucker as Rigoletto, Jane Thorngren as Gilda and Stuart Neill as the Duke.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 20, 1994
Dundalk group taps to 'Stepping Out'Dundalk Community Theatre will present the Baltimore premiere of Richard Harris' tap dance musical, "Stepping Out" for two weekends beginning Friday. An ensemble piece about a dance class made up of an assortment of adult students, "Stepping Out" made its debut on Broadway under the direction of Tommy Tune; in 1991 it was made into a movie with Liza Minnelli and Shelley Winters.John Desmone directs the Dundalk production at Dundalk Community College, 7200 Sollers Point Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
Here, as promised, is John Dorsey's Sun Magazine review of Phillips at Harborplace, dated October 26, 1980. I ended up having mixed feelings about posting it. For one, I had to type it in myself (hard to do when you keep laughing). Also, I don't want to pile on to Phillips. But mostly, because it's so well written and so insightful that it makes me feel like el supremo knuckleheado. John Dorsey died in April 2005. He was a class act. Here's the review. Dining with Dorsey Hard to Explain Success of Phillips at Harbor To the outrage of most of my friends, I was one of the Harborplace doubters.
FEATURES
April 14, 2008
Before there were blogs or podcasts or online chats, Baltimore journalist John Dorsey, who died Friday at age 69, made his mark the old-fashioned way -- by sheer dint of the written word. During four decades as a feature writer and critic for The Sunday Sun and The Sun, his writing had an impact not because it was instantaneous but because it was enduring. And, yet, he brought something new to the paper -- a fresh eye on art, a different way of looking at Baltimore's emerging restaurant scene and its changing urban landscape.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
Readers turned to his essays on Baltimore's restaurants with their morning coffee in the 1970s - often before reading the main news. A decade later, his learned criticism forged interest in Baltimore's artistic community and drew audiences to little-known studios and galleries. Newspaper patrons recognized that the familiar byline, John Dorsey, and what he had to say could irritate, chide or praise. They also knew his prose was readable, clear and full of precise opinions. Mr. Dorsey died yesterday of Lou Gehrig's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, from which he had suffered for nearly four years.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Look again in Baltimore John Dorsey Photographs by James DuSel The Johns Hopkins University Press / 189 pages A few years ago the photographer James DuSel asked John Dorsey, Baltimore's premier art and architecture critic, if he would consider doing a book with him. Dorsey recalls saying "yes" without a second's hesitation. The result is this book, a long meditation by Dorsey on DuSel's evocative photographs and on art, architecture and life - in a volume handsomely published by the Johns Hopkins press.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | June 10, 2001
A gargoyle, an antique chair leg, an ornate iron grid -- these are elements in Scott Ponemone's watercolors. Like bits of glass in a kaleidoscope, they tumble and turn, sometimes appearing only once, sometimes repeating themselves, always forming a splendidly colorful whole. Ponemone draws upon the monuments, buildings or homes of Baltimore for inspiration. Weaving together meticulously rendered architectural and decorative details, he creates handsome paintings layered with history and meaning.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2000
SENIORS RULED the school Friday at the 50 Plus Expo sponsored by the Howard County Department of Citizen Services' Office on Aging at Wilde Lake High School. With more than 120 exhibitors lining the halls, the fair was a one-stop shop for information on issues of interest to the mature generation, such as housing, finances and health care. Beverly and John Dorsey of Ellicott City arrived bright and early after taking a shuttle from The Mall in Columbia. The shuttle service was new this year, helping to relieve parking problems for the crowd, estimated at about 4,000.
NEWS
December 7, 1994
Dorsey on KeownJohn Dorsey's Nov. 9 article concerning Ian Keown of Gourmet magazine ("On the outside, looking lost") was quite a come-uppance. Yes sir, he really told him off good!He stood up for our art and culture here in Baltimore by setting the record straight! What's more, he used his position with the paper to publicly embarrass both the author and that "out of town" publication.Too bad public flogging is no longer legal, because the amphitheater at Harborplace would have been such a great place to set up the pillory.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | December 4, 1994
Dawn Upshaw will sing with BSODawn Upshaw has become one of the great stars of the vocal world, a soprano who possesses remarkable beauty of sound and still more remarkable intelligence and musicality. She and BSO music director David Zinman are longtime partners: two of their records together have won Grammys, and their disc of Henryk Gorecki's Symphony No. 3 is one of the biggest-sellers (more than 500,000 copies sold and still going) in the history of classical music. Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8:15 p.m., Upshaw will make another of her always much-anticipated visits to Meyerhoff Hall to collaborate with Zinman and the BSO. She will sing three concert arias by Mozart and the world premiere of Robert Beaser's song cycle, "The Heavenly Feast."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
ONE OF Howard County's oldest structures, an 18th-century manor house known as Dorsey Hall, will be restored as part of a $3.5 million office center scheduled to open early next year. Howard County Executive James N. Robey joined developers Richard Talkin and Donald Reuwer on Tuesday to break ground for the project, called the Dorsey Hall Manor Executive Offices. The development, at 5100 Dorsey Hall Drive in Columbia, will include the construction of 32,000 square feet of office space in four two-story buildings.
FEATURES
By SUN ART CRITIC | November 9, 1997
Josephine Jacobsen has been a published poet for 79 years, since the children's magazine St. Nicholas printed a poem when she was 10 years old. Many years later, in an essay about becoming a poet, she remembered the never-to-be-equaled experience of going down to the newsstand, buying a copy of the magazine and opening it to her first published poem:"I stood on the sidewalk, obstructive, stunned, looking at my words, naked, displayed to the world, and...
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