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February 28, 1992
The following are Music Critic Stephen Wigler's picks of five don't-miss concerts on next season's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra schedule:* Mahler's Symphony No. 9. David Zinman, conductor. Sept. 17, 18 and 19* Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5 and Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade. Yuri Temirkanov, conductor. Dec. 17, 18 and 19* John Corigliano's Fantasia on an Ostinato and Vaughan Williams' "A Sea Symphony." Leonard Slatkin, conductor. Jan. 7, 8 and 9* Bartok's Cello Concerto, Bloch's Schelomo and Stephen Albert's Cello concerto.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
The Los Angeles Philharmonic brought an inspired -- you might even say brave -- program to the Kenendy Center Tuesday night and made every note of it count.  Instead of picking the usual crowd-pleasing stuff to go with Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5, as touring orchestras are apt to do, the Philharmonic's celebrated young music director, Gustavo Dudamel, chose a challenging score that divided listeners when it was first heard in 1990 and may divide...
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NEWS
By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
"Baroque Inventions," music of Scarlatti, Bach and Handel, performed by Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl; Dorian DOR-90209It is an eternal mystery why the music gods deigned to have Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel and Domenico Scarlatti born in the same year, 1685, but 300 years later the world is still captivated by their talent.Their music is in wonderful hands when performed by the Baltimore guitar duo of Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl, who seem to have acquired seven-league boots since they signed a six-disc contract with Dorian.
NEWS
By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
"Baroque Inventions," music of Scarlatti, Bach and Handel, performed by Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl; Dorian DOR-90209It is an eternal mystery why the music gods deigned to have Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel and Domenico Scarlatti born in the same year, 1685, but 300 years later the world is still captivated by their talent.Their music is in wonderful hands when performed by the Baltimore guitar duo of Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl, who seem to have acquired seven-league boots since they signed a six-disc contract with Dorian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
The Los Angeles Philharmonic brought an inspired -- you might even say brave -- program to the Kenendy Center Tuesday night and made every note of it count.  Instead of picking the usual crowd-pleasing stuff to go with Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5, as touring orchestras are apt to do, the Philharmonic's celebrated young music director, Gustavo Dudamel, chose a challenging score that divided listeners when it was first heard in 1990 and may divide...
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 5, 1991
JAMES GALWAY, the owner of gold-plated flutes and a 14-karat sound, has given up conducting and almost all teaching because they threaten to nibble away at his art, generally ranked at the top since he went solo in 1975."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 19, 2008
In his Symphony No. 3, Beethoven is full of fire and grand gestures, more than enough to justify the work's title, Eroica - "Heroic." In his Piano Concerto, John Corigliano generates plenty of fire and grand gestures, too, as if he were also going for something heroic in scope. Maybe it's significant that Beethoven was only 33 in 1803 when he wrote that symphony, Corigliano only 30 in 1968 when he wrote that concerto - that's a good time in a person's life for thinking big. If you go The BSO performs at 11 a.m. today at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $15-$57.
NEWS
February 15, 1995
A paraplegic woman from West River has filed a $1.1 million suit against an Annapolis car dealership, alleging that it failed to fix her specially equipped van properly last June and that she was injured as a result.Charlotte Thompson of the 5800 block of Chalk Point Road says in the suit filed in Anne Arundel Circuit Court that Koons Ford of Annapolis sold her a van equipped with a driver's platform designed to let her operate the vehicle on her own.But when she went to pick up the van, after taking it in for repairs on June 7, the platform, designed to lift her into the vehicle, malfunctioned, "throwing her and the chair sideways," the suit alleges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | October 9, 1997
David Parsons' best-known piece, "Caught," must be seen to be believed. An homage to the phenomenon known as the persistence of vision, it fools the eye into believing a solo dancer never touches the ground -- though he's actually as gravity-bound as you or I.Using a hand-controlled strobe light, the dancer captures the in-flight moments of his jumps in a series of flashbulb images. We don't see what happens between the jumps: Our bedazzled eyes can't handle those split-second changes from light to dark.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | August 20, 1998
San Francisco Ballet journeys from the Other Coast next week to our warm and humid climes, with a program that shows off classicism, diversity and brilliance.At the Wolf Trap Festival, the company will perform "Tuning Game," a showcase for a ballerina and a consort of men, choreographed by artistic director Helgi Tomasson to the oboe concerto of John Corigliano. (Hence the title: The oboe tunes the rest of the orchestra.)Two duets are at the center of the program: "Valses Poeticos," also by Tomasson, which traces the course of a relationship through a suite of waltzes by Enrique Granados; and the "Black Swan" pas de deux from "Swan Lake," which ends with a famous sequence of 32 fouette turns.
FEATURES
February 28, 1992
The following are Music Critic Stephen Wigler's picks of five don't-miss concerts on next season's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra schedule:* Mahler's Symphony No. 9. David Zinman, conductor. Sept. 17, 18 and 19* Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5 and Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade. Yuri Temirkanov, conductor. Dec. 17, 18 and 19* John Corigliano's Fantasia on an Ostinato and Vaughan Williams' "A Sea Symphony." Leonard Slatkin, conductor. Jan. 7, 8 and 9* Bartok's Cello Concerto, Bloch's Schelomo and Stephen Albert's Cello concerto.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 5, 1991
JAMES GALWAY, the owner of gold-plated flutes and a 14-karat sound, has given up conducting and almost all teaching because they threaten to nibble away at his art, generally ranked at the top since he went solo in 1975."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2001
Annapolis and San Diego share the distinction of being the sailing capitals of their respective coasts. This weekend, they'll be sharing a conductor as well. Donald Barra, the founding music director of the San Diego Chamber Orchestra, will be in town Friday and Saturday evenings to guest-conduct the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra in a program of Mozart, Haydn, Kodaly and Corigliano. A product of Eastern institutions like Columbia University and the Eastman and Juilliard Schools of Music, Maestro Barra has become quite a musical presence in San Diego.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 29, 2003
The weekend's musical happenings included a sizzling performance by the Corigliano Quartet to close the 50th-anniversary concert season at Evergreen House in Baltimore. For this occasion, the locale was moved from the usual Carriage House site to the charming private theater inside the mansion, where chamber music was a notable hallmark of the Garrett family's residency there during the flapper and Depression eras. This young ensemble, named for composer John Corigliano, demonstrated remarkable qualities, including what was (to me, at least)
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