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NEWS
August 5, 2007
ART DAVIS, 73 Jazz bassist, psychologist Art Davis, the bassist who played with John Coltrane and other jazz greats, died of a heart attack July 29 at his home in Long Beach, Calif. He was blacklisted in the 1970s for speaking up about racism in the music industry, then later earned a doctorate in clinical psychology and balanced performance dates with appointments to see patients. "He was adventurous with his approach to playing music," said pianist Nate Morgan, who played with Dr. Davis intermittently over the past 10 years.
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NEWS
August 5, 2007
ART DAVIS, 73 Jazz bassist, psychologist Art Davis, the bassist who played with John Coltrane and other jazz greats, died of a heart attack July 29 at his home in Long Beach, Calif. He was blacklisted in the 1970s for speaking up about racism in the music industry, then later earned a doctorate in clinical psychology and balanced performance dates with appointments to see patients. "He was adventurous with his approach to playing music," said pianist Nate Morgan, who played with Dr. Davis intermittently over the past 10 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 11, 1999
Valentine's Day albums? A few years ago, the idea seemed as laughable as Arbor Day cards. Not now, though. Go into any CD store, and if love isn't in the air, it's definitely in the bins. Here's a look at some of this year's offerings:Ray Charles"Love Songs" (Rhino 75572)He may not be a deep-voiced loverman like Barry White or a swoony tenor like Andrea Boccelli, but few singers pack as much emotion into a love song as Ray Charles does. Spend some time with the 16 selections in "Love Songs," and you'll understand why. When a song calls for crooning, as in "Someday," Charles is as smooth as Billy Eckstine; but when raw emotion is in order, as on "I Can't Stop Loving You," he definitely lays his heart on the line.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2004
Elvin Jones, whose explosive drumming powered the John Coltrane Quartet, the most influential and controversial jazz ensemble of the 1960s, died yesterday in New York. He was 76 and lived in Manhattan and Nagasaki, Japan. Mr. Jones' death, which came after several months of failing health, was announced by John DeChristopher, director of artist relations for the Avedis Zildjian Co., maker of Jones' cymbals. Jones continued to perform until a few weeks ago, often taking an oxygen tank onto the bandstand.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
Welcome to "The Pro File," a new, occasional feature in which Anne Arundel Live will introduce you to a professional entertainer, artist, musician or dancer who is doing something noteworthy in the area. Today's pro is Annapolis guitarist Rob Levit, for whom music is a religious expression.THE PROWhen he's plucking the strings on his Heritage guitar, Rob Levit is an explorer, winding his way through the music, looking for the chord to perk up his ears, the notes to change the mood, the pause.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2004
Elvin Jones, whose explosive drumming powered the John Coltrane Quartet, the most influential and controversial jazz ensemble of the 1960s, died yesterday in New York. He was 76 and lived in Manhattan and Nagasaki, Japan. Mr. Jones' death, which came after several months of failing health, was announced by John DeChristopher, director of artist relations for the Avedis Zildjian Co., maker of Jones' cymbals. Jones continued to perform until a few weeks ago, often taking an oxygen tank onto the bandstand.
TOPIC
By Andrew Gumbel | February 27, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO -- Every Sunday for the past 29 years, a storefront church in the heart of San Francisco has swayed to the mellifluous tones and odd rhythms of jazz legend John Coltrane, in the name of divine worship. The music is not a prop but the very key to the Almighty. For this is no ordinary house of God, but the St. John Coltrane African Orthodox Church, the first place on earth to turn a jazz saxophone player into an object of religious devotion. Jazz fans have been quietly coming for years, as have local aficionados bedazzled by the mystic allure of Coltranes sleeve notes for his 1964 album, A Love Supreme.
NEWS
June 2, 2006
Jazz tribute -- Ruby Glover, nicknamed Baltimore's "godmother of jazz," will perform at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, during the annual Garden Party and Tribute to American Jazz at Epiphany Chapel and Church House. The chapel is located at 1419 Odenton Road, Odenton. Jim Ballard, nephew of John Coltrane, and Chris Haley, nephew of author Alex Haley, will provide musical accompaniment. The event is free. 410-336-8383.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 30, 1992
LIVEAC/DC (Atco 92212)theory, a live album ought to be the easiest kind to make, since the only thing to worry about is making sure the microphones are on. So why aren't more concert recordings as accurate or energetic as AC/DC's latest, the aptly titled "Live"? Some of the credit no doubt belongs with producer Bruce Fairbairn, who keeps the guitars crisp and the drums punchy, and it obviously doesn't hurt that the set list includes all of the band's best-loved material, from "Highway to Hell" to the recent "Thunderstruck."
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY DOUG KAPUSTIN and PHOTOS BY DOUG KAPUSTIN,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | October 3, 2005
A throwback to the 1940s and '50s, the Cadillac Parade and Royal Theater Music Festival was revived for the ninth year Saturday. The original Cadillac Parade was a major event in the city's black community, in which Baltimoreans would ride along or watch as Cadillacs cruised down Pennsylvania Avenue. Before the 1960s, The Avenue was a center of commerce and night life, home to the Royal Theater, the Lucky Number Club and the exclusive Sphinx Club. Jazz greats including Cab Calloway, Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong and John Coltrane performed here.
TOPIC
By Andrew Gumbel | February 27, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO -- Every Sunday for the past 29 years, a storefront church in the heart of San Francisco has swayed to the mellifluous tones and odd rhythms of jazz legend John Coltrane, in the name of divine worship. The music is not a prop but the very key to the Almighty. For this is no ordinary house of God, but the St. John Coltrane African Orthodox Church, the first place on earth to turn a jazz saxophone player into an object of religious devotion. Jazz fans have been quietly coming for years, as have local aficionados bedazzled by the mystic allure of Coltranes sleeve notes for his 1964 album, A Love Supreme.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
Welcome to "The Pro File," a new, occasional feature in which Anne Arundel Live will introduce you to a professional entertainer, artist, musician or dancer who is doing something noteworthy in the area. Today's pro is Annapolis guitarist Rob Levit, for whom music is a religious expression.THE PROWhen he's plucking the strings on his Heritage guitar, Rob Levit is an explorer, winding his way through the music, looking for the chord to perk up his ears, the notes to change the mood, the pause.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 11, 1999
Valentine's Day albums? A few years ago, the idea seemed as laughable as Arbor Day cards. Not now, though. Go into any CD store, and if love isn't in the air, it's definitely in the bins. Here's a look at some of this year's offerings:Ray Charles"Love Songs" (Rhino 75572)He may not be a deep-voiced loverman like Barry White or a swoony tenor like Andrea Boccelli, but few singers pack as much emotion into a love song as Ray Charles does. Spend some time with the 16 selections in "Love Songs," and you'll understand why. When a song calls for crooning, as in "Someday," Charles is as smooth as Billy Eckstine; but when raw emotion is in order, as on "I Can't Stop Loving You," he definitely lays his heart on the line.
NEWS
February 7, 1995
Art Taylor, 65, a drummer whose crisp, hard-driving work is heard on classic recordings by John Coltrane, Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk, died suddenly yesterday in New York, friends said. Besides performing and pioneering modern jazz drumming, he was the author of a classic book of jazz interviews called "Notes and Tones." The book vividly set forth the concerns of America's jazz musicians -- from anguish and bitterness over racism to record company exploitation to worries over the loss of jazz musicians to drug use.John Smith, 63, who changed his name from Robert Earl Van Orden as a joke, then gained starring roles in the TV westerns "Laramie" and "Cimarron City," died Jan. 25 at his Los Angeles home of what was probably a combination of cirrhosis and heart problems, according to his former wife, actress Luana Patten Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | June 1, 2006
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Dave Cipriani, 19-string Indian slide guitar, classical and electric guitars; Adam Hopkins, upright bass; Chris Lerch, drums Founded in --2004 Style --jazz funk with Indian overtones Influenced by --Pandit Barun; Kumar Pal; Medeski, Martin and Wood; John Coltrane; Miles Davis; G. Love and Special Sauce Notable --At their shows, Cipriani will play Indian or electric guitars, depending on the song. He learned to play classically first and then tackled blues and country.
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