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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 25, 2001
I admit I did not greet the arrival of preview cassettes from The Learning Channel for a four-hour series on the human face with the same enthusiasm as I did, say, an episode of The Sopranos or Six Feet Under from HBO. But what a pleasant surprise The Human Face - a provocative and amusing exploration of physiology as culture and possibly even destiny - turned out to be. Maybe I shouldn't have been so surprised given the huge visage of the fabulous John...
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | February 13, 2008
GLAMOUR! It exists even for some who have passed into "a certain age." Nowhere was this better proved than at last week's AARP Magazine's "Movies For Grownups" awards at the Bel Air Hotel. The lineup? - Julie Christie, Jackie Bisset, Julie Andrews, Gena Rowlands, Ruby Dee, Angela Lansbury, Shirley Jones and Dana Delany. And a few "glamorous" men such as Michael York, Hal Holbrook and John Cleese. Everybody was in fine fettle. My friend, the equally glam Caroline Graham, put this together, and Hollywood loves her way with a fete.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 26, 1991
Parents looking for something suitable for small children now have two feature-length animated cartoons films that meet the requirement.One is ''Beauty and the Beast.'' The other is ''An American Tail: Fievel Goes West.''There is no real contest between the two. ''Beauty and the Beast'' is the decided winner by a mile or two, but ''Fievel'' has its charms.''Fievel'' is a sequel to the 1986 ''An American Tail,'' in which the Mousekewitz family, immigrants from Russia, settled on the East Coast.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 16, 2007
THE SIMPSONS MOVIE Fox DVD / $29.99 John Cleese once said that after putting together the first Monty Python compilation film, And Now for Something Completely Different, the comedy team learned that an audience won't keep laughing past the 50-minute mark if it doesn't care for the characters or become involved in a story. But the writers and producers behind The Simpsons Movie didn't need a warm-up film to learn that lesson: They created a classic screwball comedy right off the bat. This 90-minute carnival of a film contains more thrills and laughs than any combination of clowns, creep shows and animal acts.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | February 13, 2008
GLAMOUR! It exists even for some who have passed into "a certain age." Nowhere was this better proved than at last week's AARP Magazine's "Movies For Grownups" awards at the Bel Air Hotel. The lineup? - Julie Christie, Jackie Bisset, Julie Andrews, Gena Rowlands, Ruby Dee, Angela Lansbury, Shirley Jones and Dana Delany. And a few "glamorous" men such as Michael York, Hal Holbrook and John Cleese. Everybody was in fine fettle. My friend, the equally glam Caroline Graham, put this together, and Hollywood loves her way with a fete.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 19, 2005
Valiant in name. But Valiant in aim? Or effort? It's a "stiff upper beak" comedy about heroic British homing pigeons fending off Nazi falcons as they bravely carry messages from the French Resistance to the Allies on the eve of D-Day. It's a perfectly competent cartoon, if rarely a thing of beauty. It's occasionally funny -- so long as you get that whole "Never so few" Battle of Britain fighter-squadron milieu and Monty Python's famous skewering of it. Not that your average 5- to 10-year-old will.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 16, 2007
THE SIMPSONS MOVIE Fox DVD / $29.99 John Cleese once said that after putting together the first Monty Python compilation film, And Now for Something Completely Different, the comedy team learned that an audience won't keep laughing past the 50-minute mark if it doesn't care for the characters or become involved in a story. But the writers and producers behind The Simpsons Movie didn't need a warm-up film to learn that lesson: They created a classic screwball comedy right off the bat. This 90-minute carnival of a film contains more thrills and laughs than any combination of clowns, creep shows and animal acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | October 3, 1999
They were, and have remained, something completely different. Thirty years ago this week, "Monty Python's Flying Circus" was first unleashed on unsuspecting audiences -- at least in England, where the show originated. (It didn't hit these shores until 1974.) Filled with dead parrots, silly walks and TV game shows featuring Karl Marx, the BBC-produced television series elevated the non sequitur to high art, mixed history and comedy in ways Western civilization had never seen, and pricked the over-inflated egos of more stuffed shirts than anything since the Marx Brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 3, 1999
Life after 'Python'The members of Monty Python released their last film, "Monty Python's Meaning of Life," in 1983. Here's a brief look at their careers outside the group:* Graham Chapman: After overcoming alcoholism and a lifelong case of stage fright, Chapman went on well-received lecture tours of college campuses through most of the 1980s. He also produced, co-wrote and starred in the film "Yellowbeard." Chapman died of cancer Oct. 4, 1989, one day short of "Python's" 20th anniversary.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1995
The royalty of the country music world gather in Nashville tonight for "The 29th Annual CMA Awards," while Maryland Public Television takes a look at religious royalty -- specifically Pope John Paul II, who's on his way to Baltimore, and the riches of the Vatican.* "The 29th Annual CMA Awards" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Singer Vince Gill, the winningest performer with 14 previous awards, is host of county music's annual honors from the Grand Ole Opry. Among the performers: Reba McEntire, John Michael Montgomery, Alison Krauss, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Dolly Parton, George Strait and Pam Tillis.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 19, 2005
Valiant in name. But Valiant in aim? Or effort? It's a "stiff upper beak" comedy about heroic British homing pigeons fending off Nazi falcons as they bravely carry messages from the French Resistance to the Allies on the eve of D-Day. It's a perfectly competent cartoon, if rarely a thing of beauty. It's occasionally funny -- so long as you get that whole "Never so few" Battle of Britain fighter-squadron milieu and Monty Python's famous skewering of it. Not that your average 5- to 10-year-old will.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick S. Pemberton and Patrick S. Pemberton,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | December 9, 2004
Writing a heist flick isn't so tough. Start with a team of criminals (usually all male): There's the safe cracker (usually the most likable character - and the movie's biggest star), the computer expert (typically the nerd with a few funny lines) and the explosives guy (usually the loose cannon, who almost screws it all up). Then define the prize - diamonds are always good, though famous paintings add a little class - and make sure one of the guys has a love interest who wants him to give up his life of crime.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 25, 2001
I admit I did not greet the arrival of preview cassettes from The Learning Channel for a four-hour series on the human face with the same enthusiasm as I did, say, an episode of The Sopranos or Six Feet Under from HBO. But what a pleasant surprise The Human Face - a provocative and amusing exploration of physiology as culture and possibly even destiny - turned out to be. Maybe I shouldn't have been so surprised given the huge visage of the fabulous John...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 3, 1999
Life after 'Python'The members of Monty Python released their last film, "Monty Python's Meaning of Life," in 1983. Here's a brief look at their careers outside the group:* Graham Chapman: After overcoming alcoholism and a lifelong case of stage fright, Chapman went on well-received lecture tours of college campuses through most of the 1980s. He also produced, co-wrote and starred in the film "Yellowbeard." Chapman died of cancer Oct. 4, 1989, one day short of "Python's" 20th anniversary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | October 3, 1999
They were, and have remained, something completely different. Thirty years ago this week, "Monty Python's Flying Circus" was first unleashed on unsuspecting audiences -- at least in England, where the show originated. (It didn't hit these shores until 1974.) Filled with dead parrots, silly walks and TV game shows featuring Karl Marx, the BBC-produced television series elevated the non sequitur to high art, mixed history and comedy in ways Western civilization had never seen, and pricked the over-inflated egos of more stuffed shirts than anything since the Marx Brothers.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1995
The royalty of the country music world gather in Nashville tonight for "The 29th Annual CMA Awards," while Maryland Public Television takes a look at religious royalty -- specifically Pope John Paul II, who's on his way to Baltimore, and the riches of the Vatican.* "The 29th Annual CMA Awards" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Singer Vince Gill, the winningest performer with 14 previous awards, is host of county music's annual honors from the Grand Ole Opry. Among the performers: Reba McEntire, John Michael Montgomery, Alison Krauss, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Dolly Parton, George Strait and Pam Tillis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick S. Pemberton and Patrick S. Pemberton,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | December 9, 2004
Writing a heist flick isn't so tough. Start with a team of criminals (usually all male): There's the safe cracker (usually the most likable character - and the movie's biggest star), the computer expert (typically the nerd with a few funny lines) and the explosives guy (usually the loose cannon, who almost screws it all up). Then define the prize - diamonds are always good, though famous paintings add a little class - and make sure one of the guys has a love interest who wants him to give up his life of crime.
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By Zap2it | August 28, 2002
LOS ANGELES - A host of TV stars will be on hand to give awards to the people who make them look good on camera at the Creative Arts Emmy Awards next month. Jennifer Garner (Alias), Zach Braff (Scrubs), Jorja Fox (CSI) and Lauren Ambrose (Six Feet Under) are among the actors scheduled to present awards at the Creative Arts Emmys on Sept. 14. Saturday Night Live's Darrell Hammond will be host of the ceremony, which will be broadcast on E! "We are excited to have such an eclectic group of talent from a myriad of television genres and networks," says the show's producer, Spike Jones Jr. "It's great to see that this show has grown enough to demand such a positive response from TV stars."
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By Lou Cedrone | November 26, 1991
Parents looking for something suitable for small children now have two feature-length animated cartoons films that meet the requirement.One is ''Beauty and the Beast.'' The other is ''An American Tail: Fievel Goes West.''There is no real contest between the two. ''Beauty and the Beast'' is the decided winner by a mile or two, but ''Fievel'' has its charms.''Fievel'' is a sequel to the 1986 ''An American Tail,'' in which the Mousekewitz family, immigrants from Russia, settled on the East Coast.
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