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John Chaney

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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
John Chaney recruited Aaron McKie from one of Philadelphia's most impoverished neighborhoods, just a short walk from Temple University's inner-city campus.He recruited Huey Futch from Naranja, Fla. -- just outside Homestead -- and the ravages of Hurricane Andrew.And once, as legend has it, he recruited a 7-footer named Eddie Geiger out of a car wash. That was back in the late 1970s, before Temple, when Chaney still coached at what is now Cheyney (Pa.) University.When Chaney brings his 24th-ranked Owls to the Baltimore Arena for a nonconference game against Maryland tomorrow, you can glimpse all their distinctive trademarks.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
Players who keep normal college hours, man-to-man defense and a quicker tempo are in. Pre-dawn practices, a matchup zone and games in the 50s are out - along with the inimitable coach who threatened a rival's life and admitted using a goon. Temple comes to Towson on Saturday (2 p.m., Comcast SportsNet), and for the first time since 1982, John Chaney isn't on the Owls' bench. Maybe the most accomplished coach never to get to the Final Four, Chaney guided the Owls to five regional finals and a No. 1 ranking in 1988.
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NEWS
November 21, 2003
On November 19, 2003, ALBION "Bill" HATHEWAY; father of Eileen Guthmann and the late William Hatheway; brother of Vivian, Edna, Lillie and Darlene; grandfather of John Chaney and Dustin Guthmann; son of the late Marie Hatheway. Services are private.
SPORTS
January 9, 2006
"We expect merit will determine who will play and who will lead. But coaches and athletics administrators themselves are not always selected, it would appear, entirely on their merits." Myles Brand NCAA president, on the lack of blacks in college coaching and sports administrative positions "I didn't call my kids goons, or nobody else goons. I said every coach in the world sent kids in to take hard fouls and ... the media went crazy on it. I thought we resolved it. Phil and I resolved it. We sent money to Katrina and that's what we did to resolve it. But you want to sing that song?
SPORTS
January 9, 2006
"We expect merit will determine who will play and who will lead. But coaches and athletics administrators themselves are not always selected, it would appear, entirely on their merits." Myles Brand NCAA president, on the lack of blacks in college coaching and sports administrative positions "I didn't call my kids goons, or nobody else goons. I said every coach in the world sent kids in to take hard fouls and ... the media went crazy on it. I thought we resolved it. Phil and I resolved it. We sent money to Katrina and that's what we did to resolve it. But you want to sing that song?
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 1998
A book review of "A March to Madness," by John Feinstein, in the Jan. 4 Perspective section incorrectly stated that the book omitted that former North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith had retired in October.The Sun regrets the error."A March to Madness: The View from the Floor in the Atlantic Coast Conference," by John Feinstein. Little, Brown and Co. 480 pages. $24.95.In college basketball, every game is a test, every loss carrying the whiff of failure. Yet John Chaney at Temple likes to say that defeat is only "a bend in the river."
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By Dick Jerardi and Dick Jerardi,Special to The Sun | February 24, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- If John Chaney ever decides to get away from Philadelphia, far away, there would be only one destination. The Temple basketball coach would fly south, fly for hours. Then, would get on a helicopter that would maneuver its way onto a remote island.And Chaney would arrive at Jurassic Park. The coach, 61, is a human dinosaur.He is an original in a profession that has precious few men who don't sound alike, look alike and coach alike.Chaney's teams don't play like teams anywhere, not in the '90s era of three-point madness, fast-break, damn-the-consequences basketball.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | September 23, 1990
The $50,000 Ladies Professional Bowlers Tour Hammer Eastern Open will begin Saturday at Country Club Lanes on Pulaski Highway with pro-am events scheduled for 2 p.m., 4 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.Action will continue through Oct. 4, with the touring pros beginning practice rounds Sunday at 8 a.m. and the tournament beginning Oct. 1 at 9 a.m.The tournament will culminate Oct. 4 at 7:30 p.m. with stepladder finals, which will be televised by ESPN.Aleta Sill is the defending champion, and Jeanne Maiden and Rene Fleming won the previous tournaments at Country Club Lanes.
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- For all that inflation has affected, one price has remained unchanged: the cost of dreaming."You can still do that for free," John Chaney was reminded."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
LANDOVER -- The topic of the day before second-round play in the NCAA East Regional was two of college basketball's high-profile coaches -- Temple's John Chaney and Indiana's Bobby Knight, who match wits for the first time at USAir Arena today. And Temple captain Rick Brunson was analyzing the subjects with great relish.Of Chaney's pre-dawn practice sessions, Brunson said, "He does a lot of yelling and smacking people. I guess he's getting old and senile, and we can handle him."Asked if the sideline antics of these two controversial coaches might upstage the game itself, Brunson said, "They're both crazy, but no one is paying to watch the coaches perform."
SPORTS
March 20, 2004
DENVER - They are so much alike in a sense, Gary Williams and Jim Boeheim, that they actually like each other. They are both cynical and basically loners, but these two grumpy major college basketball coaches really share a mutual respect and friendship. So when No. 4 seed Maryland (20-11) takes on No. 5 Syracuse (22-7) today in the second round of the NCAA tournament, it will pit two old-hand coaches who have become legends at their respective institutions. "I knew Jim a little bit, not well, when I was an assistant at Lafayette, and he was an assistant at Syracuse," said Williams, 59, of Boeheim, also 59. "Then we played against each other when we were younger in the Big East.
NEWS
November 21, 2003
On November 19, 2003, ALBION "Bill" HATHEWAY; father of Eileen Guthmann and the late William Hatheway; brother of Vivian, Edna, Lillie and Darlene; grandfather of John Chaney and Dustin Guthmann; son of the late Marie Hatheway. Services are private.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2001
ATLANTA - Michigan State keeps winning games, if not friends, in the NCAA tournament. On the day off at the South Regional, Spartans coach Tom Izzo joked that his team had just eliminated America's favorite underdog, Gonzaga, and now it had to take down America's coach, John Chaney of Temple. Displaying plenty of respect but little sentiment, defending champion Michigan State started fast in each half and led the entire way to beat 11th-seeded Temple, 69-62, in the South final at the Georgia Dome yesterday.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
ATLANTA -- When John Chaney met the press at the Georgia Dome on Thursday, he never shed his full-length, hooded windbreaker and sunglasses. College basketball's Obi-Wan Kenobi talks like a man from a long time ago and a galaxy far, far away, and yesterday Chaney was asked if a "mystique" surrounds his zone defense, which is to Temple what the "Force" is to Star Wars. "Many of us," Chaney said, "have a tendency to make a mystery out of B. S." That was Chaney's acknowledgement that his program's success in March is founded in fundamentals, and that the zone's reputation is as important as its execution.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Jerry Bembry and Ken Murray and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1999
After a plodding, physical victory over Oklahoma in the Midwest Regional semifinals, Michigan State coach Tom Izzo is growing weary of talking about the Spartans' grinding style of play."
SPORTS
By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- For all that inflation has affected, one price has remained unchanged: the cost of dreaming."You can still do that for free," John Chaney was reminded."
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 25, 1990
Jeff Pyles of Hyattsville defeated Kenny Mumaw of Glen Arm, 165-153, to win the $5,000 first prize in the Duckpin Professional Bowlers Association Masters Tournament Sunday at Fair Lanes Westview.The victory was Pyles' third of the year on the tour. Mumaw won $2,500 for finishing second.Pyles gained the final by defeating Wes O'Donnell ($1,500) of Riverdale, 198-142. O'Donnell earlier defeated DPBA Bowler of the Year, Swede Lavers, of Stratford, Conn., in a two-frame roll-off after they tied at 136. Lavers, who earned $1,250 plus $500 for being bowler of the year, rolled first in the roll-off and scored 28. O'Donnell doubled to win the match.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 4, 1999
NEW YORK -- Every year, usually about 10 or so days before the NCAA men's basketball tournament begins, CBS gathers the 16 announcers who will work the proceedings to discuss how the network will bring the grand spectacle to an unsuspecting public.Then, the announcers are turned loose on a group of reporters, and some rather predictable things happen. Like lead analyst Billy Packer unloading a torrent of criticism on the NBA and what it has done to basketball. Or Packer's former partner, Al McGuire, bringing down the room with some bit of inspired wackiness.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 4, 1999
NEW YORK -- Every year, usually about 10 or so days before the NCAA men's basketball tournament begins, CBS gathers the 16 announcers who will work the proceedings to discuss how the network will bring the grand spectacle to an unsuspecting public.Then, the announcers are turned loose on a group of reporters, and some rather predictable things happen. Like lead analyst Billy Packer unloading a torrent of criticism on the NBA and what it has done to basketball. Or Packer's former partner, Al McGuire, bringing down the room with some bit of inspired wackiness.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 13, 1998
At 53, he is growing philosophical. Gary Williams has never been to the Final Four, and might never get there. What do you expect him to say, that his life has no meaning?This is his 10th season at Maryland. Ten years, twice as long as many anticipated. Ten years of excitement. Ten years of triumph. Ten years of revival.But no Final Fours.Fairly or not, that's how college basketball coaches are measured these days. Williams is a good coach, admired and respected. But true reverence is assured for only those who play on the final Saturday of the season.
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