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John Cage

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NEWS
August 15, 1992
It would be easy to dismiss the American composer John Cage, who died this week at age 79, as an engaging eccentric who never quite managed to make "real" music. But that would be a mistake.Mr. Cage's experiments with "prepared" pianos, electronic synthesizers and other unorthodox instruments have been enormously influential -- despite the reluctance of critics to accord him recognition as a "serious" composer. Ironically, it has fallen to popular culture to exploit many of the musical breakthroughs Mr. Cage pioneered.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
North Avenue on Sunday afternoon seemed to be under attack by bees. But not just any bees. These would have to be big ones, equipped with electronic amplification and reverb effects, and something to make it sound as if they were flying through a giant echoing drainpipe. As it turns out, it was not any of that, but a sidewalk show at the Megapolis Audio Festival, which variously buzzed, clicked, murmured, thrummed, chirped, plucked and drummed through three days of experimental performance, workshops, lectures and exhibits.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 13, 1992
John Cage, the 79-year old composer who died of a stroke in New York yesterday, wrote the most famous piece of music you never heard.It was called "4'33"," and the reason you never heard it was that the musicians (or musician) performing it weren't to make any sound at all. They would simply sit, poised as if to play, without making a sound. And they would do this for four minutes and 33 seconds (hence the title).Needless to say, writing a work that called for mere silence made Cage the butt of more than a few jokes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
"Until I die, there will be sounds," wrote John Cage, the Andy Warhol of music. "And they will continue following my death. One need not fear about the future of music." Even Cage, the radical, hugely influential composer who died in 1993, may have been surprised to learn just how long some of his own sounds would linger in that future. A performance of his Organ2/ASLSP began in an 11th-century church in Halberstadt, Germany, on what would have been Cage's 88th birthday, Sept. 5, 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
"Until I die, there will be sounds," wrote John Cage, the Andy Warhol of music. "And they will continue following my death. One need not fear about the future of music." Even Cage, the radical, hugely influential composer who died in 1993, may have been surprised to learn just how long some of his own sounds would linger in that future. A performance of his Organ2/ASLSP began in an 11th-century church in Halberstadt, Germany, on what would have been Cage's 88th birthday, Sept. 5, 2000.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
North Avenue on Sunday afternoon seemed to be under attack by bees. But not just any bees. These would have to be big ones, equipped with electronic amplification and reverb effects, and something to make it sound as if they were flying through a giant echoing drainpipe. As it turns out, it was not any of that, but a sidewalk show at the Megapolis Audio Festival, which variously buzzed, clicked, murmured, thrummed, chirped, plucked and drummed through three days of experimental performance, workshops, lectures and exhibits.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 19, 1993
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore opened its 44th season last night by presenting the New York-based new-music ensemble Continuum in a program that included two world premiere performances of works by composers (both in their late 50s) from the former Soviet Union. The more immediately striking of these was "And It Will Be," a setting of eight of Mykola Vorobyov's poems by Leonid Hrabovsky, a Ukrainian composer now living in New York. This work for singer, ensemble (including piano and synthesizer, clarinet and violin)
FEATURES
March 1, 2006
Concert Pianist Sachs performs For something completely dif ferent, check out veteran pia nist Joel Sachs, who will explore the early keyboard music of ultimate pathfinder John Cage, including the Suite for Toy Pi ano. At 8 tonight at Fine Arts Recital Hall, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle. Admission is free. Information: 410-455-2787.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Keys | February 17, 2000
Enjoy two evenings of classical music. Members of the Peabody Preparatory Faculty will present a recital tonight that includes Dussek's "Sonata for Harp," performed by harpist Michaela Trnkova, and Poulenc's "Sonata," performed by David Drosinos and Bradley Permenter. The program will also feature work by Mozart, Claude Debussy, Astor Piazzola, Katherine Hoover and Jennifer Higdon. Return Saturday when Peabody Camerata, conducted by Gene Young, will perform Anton von Webern's "Five Pieces for Small Orchestra, Op. 10" and John Cage's "Suite for Toy Piano."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2002
The mix -- or collision -- of the Old and New Worlds has generated lots of discussion and debate, lots of art and music. An inquisitive woodwind quintet from France called le concert impromptu is currently exploring some of the aural examples of this cultural clash in programs that range from a transcription of Antonin Dvorak's American Quartet to Frank Zappa's Cletus Awreetus-Awrightus. Among other composers being addressed on the tour by the Paris-based, decade-old group are Bela Bartok, Claude Debussy, Luciano Berio and John Cage.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 19, 1993
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore opened its 44th season last night by presenting the New York-based new-music ensemble Continuum in a program that included two world premiere performances of works by composers (both in their late 50s) from the former Soviet Union. The more immediately striking of these was "And It Will Be," a setting of eight of Mykola Vorobyov's poems by Leonid Hrabovsky, a Ukrainian composer now living in New York. This work for singer, ensemble (including piano and synthesizer, clarinet and violin)
NEWS
August 15, 1992
It would be easy to dismiss the American composer John Cage, who died this week at age 79, as an engaging eccentric who never quite managed to make "real" music. But that would be a mistake.Mr. Cage's experiments with "prepared" pianos, electronic synthesizers and other unorthodox instruments have been enormously influential -- despite the reluctance of critics to accord him recognition as a "serious" composer. Ironically, it has fallen to popular culture to exploit many of the musical breakthroughs Mr. Cage pioneered.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 13, 1992
John Cage, the 79-year old composer who died of a stroke in New York yesterday, wrote the most famous piece of music you never heard.It was called "4'33"," and the reason you never heard it was that the musicians (or musician) performing it weren't to make any sound at all. They would simply sit, poised as if to play, without making a sound. And they would do this for four minutes and 33 seconds (hence the title).Needless to say, writing a work that called for mere silence made Cage the butt of more than a few jokes.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 2, 1993
Maryland Stage Company's 'Lear' will feature original musicThe Maryland Stage Company, the theater company in residence at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, tackles one of its most awesome challenges when Shakespeare's "King Lear" opens Thursday at the UMBCTheatre.Directed by Xerxes Mehta and starring Sam McCready, the production also features Wendy Salkind as Lear's daughter Goneril and James Brown-Orleans as the Fool. Original music has been composed by Forrest Tobey. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays through May 22. Tickets are $8. (Tickets to preview performances Tuesday and Wednesday are $5.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 3, 2002
There's a little something for just about every musical taste around town this week. Or today, for that matter: This afternoon's attractions include organist Marie-Claire Alain in recital at 3 p.m. in Peabody Institute's Griswold Hall, 1 E. Mount Vernon Place. Composers on her program range from Bach to her brother, Jehan Alain. Call 410-659-8100, Ext. 2. The Concert Artists of Baltimore presents its chorus in a program of a cappella works, from Gregorian chant to Russian vespers, directed by Edward Polochick at 5:30 p.m. today at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, North Charles Street and Northern Parkway.
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