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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
John H. Brown, who headed the Baltimore Police Department's mounted patrol for more than a decade and later became Carroll County sheriff, died Jan. 11 of heart failure at his Uniontown home. He was 85. "He was fair, a gentleman, as were his deputies," said Perry Jones, a former Carroll County commissioner who is now mayor of Union Bridge. "It was a new start for the department when he came to Carroll County, and he was a man who had his own ideas when it came to law enforcement.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
John H. Brown, who headed the Baltimore Police Department's mounted patrol for more than a decade and later became Carroll County sheriff, died Jan. 11 of heart failure at his Uniontown home. He was 85. "He was fair, a gentleman, as were his deputies," said Perry Jones, a former Carroll County commissioner who is now mayor of Union Bridge. "It was a new start for the department when he came to Carroll County, and he was a man who had his own ideas when it came to law enforcement.
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NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane and Michael E. Ruane,Special to The Sun | May 14, 1995
"The Secret Six. The true tale of the men who conspired with John Brown," by Edward J. Renehan Jr. Illustrated. 308 pages. New York: Crown Publishers. $25About a week after the 1859 collapse of John Brown's Abolitionist raid on Harpers Ferry, a reporter for the New York Herald paid a call at an elegant, columned mansion on the outskirts of Syracuse, N.Y.It was the home of the wealthy hypochondriac and philanthropist Gerrit Smith. Investigators had found letters from Smith among Brown's belongings after the brief but sensational firefight in Virginia.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Herbert B. Groh, whose life as a mariner spanned the gamut from running errands on the city docks of the 1930s to work as a harbor pilot and tugboat captain, and who helped rescue and rehabilitate the Liberty ship-turned-floating-museum John W. Brown, died June 6 after a heart attack at the Catonsville Commons nursing home. He was 92. "I think he was one of a kind, or at least one of a very few," said Michael J. Schneider, a past chairman of the Project Liberty Ship project that guided the restoration of the John W. Brown.
NEWS
August 8, 2004
John Brown, a retired railroader and founder of the old Miracle Tabernacle of God Apostolic Church, died of heart failure Aug. 1 at Maryland General Hospital. He was 78. Mr. Brown was born and raised in Baltimore and attended city public schools. He was employed for more than 30 years as a trackman for the Patapsco and Back River Railroad, a Bethlehem Steel Corp. subsidiary, from which he retired in 1984. In the 1950s, Mr. Brown joined First Apostolic Church and later was commissioned an elder in the Holy Tabernacle of God Apostolic Church.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 1, 1997
Later, he became a mad visionary bent on murder and slave insurrection. Later still, he became a martyr idealized in song and bronze. But in 1847, John Brown was a failing wool merchant in Springfield, Mass.A daguerreotype from those days, recently purchased and now on display at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, shows a thin, clean-shaven, intense man with a piercing stare. It is the oldest known image of Brown, whose 1859 raid at Harper's Ferry demonstrated the passions of pre-Civil War America.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- John Brown had just sat down in his courtside seat at Cole Field House when the parade began.Ex-Oriole Bill Ripken was one of the first to say hello. Former Maryland basketball player Cedric Lewis stopped by, then former U.S. Senator Joe Tydings. Sportswriter John Feinstein followed.Even the referee, taking his place for the tip-off of the Maryland game, waved to Brown.It seemed that everyone in the place knew Brown, from the players he has befriended to the corporate and political elite gathered in the coveted folding chairs ringing the court.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | September 3, 1995
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- The monument to a black man killed during John Brown's pre-Civil War raid on this hillside hamlet is back in public view. So is controversy that has dogged the rectangular, 6-foot piece of granite since 1931.This time, the controversy is about an effort to end the controversy.The monument was erected by the Sons of the Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy to honor Heyward Shepherd, a Baltimore and Ohio Railway Co. worker who was shot fatally during the early hours of the raid when he failed to obey a raider's command to halt.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 31, 2001
Quick quiz: Who was John Brown, and what are the poems about him? Score one meager point for remembering "John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave." That's the line from a popular Civil War ditty "John Brown's Body" about firebrand abolitionist John Brown. In 1859, Brown led an anti-slavery raid on Harpers Ferry, W.Va. (about an hour west of Howard County). Brown's attempt at revolution and slave-liberation failed, and he was hanged six weeks later in nearby Charles Town, W.Va.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | May 1, 2005
John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights By David S. Reynolds. Alfred A. Knopf. 580 pages. $35. John Brown has achieved eternal life in our culture. His own words from the Charles Town jail helped shape the meaning of his deeds, and his memory has marched ever since to the thrum of the battle hymn he inspired. The old crusader even breathes life into modern fiction, including this year's Pulitzer Prize-winning Gilead. Brown's last surviving son, Owen, narrates Russell Banks' Cloudsplitter.
TRAVEL
Baltimore Sun reporter | June 7, 2013
Go here: This is where the Shenandoah meets the Potomac, where the Appalachian Trail joins the C&O Canal path, where past and present converge as well. A lot of things come together in the misty, mystic hamlet of Harpers Ferry, W.Va. - often, in its history, tragically so. Here, abolitionists led by John Brown clashed with backers of slavery in an ill-fated attempt to take over an arsenal and launch a slave revolt. It's been more than 150 years since John Brown led a group of men who seized the arsenal at Harper's Ferry in an attempt to incite a slave rebellion, but the town still looks much as it did then.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
In Tony Horwitz's book about John Brown's 1859 raid on Harper's Ferry, "Midnight Rising", he writes that Brown was captured on Oct. 16, his trial commenced on Oct. 25, and he was found guilty on Oct. 31. Brown was sentenced on Nov. 2 and hung on Dec. 2, 1859. Justice was delivered in an exact, brief manner. There is absolutely no reason why the trial of the surviving suspect in the Boston bombing, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, can't be expedited in a similarly timely fashion. The outcome of course depends on the trial and jury.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
Herbert Stokes Walesby, former art director of the News American who volunteered aboard the SS John W. Brown, where he sketched his shipmates, died of lung cancer Nov. 14 at Christiana Care in Wilmington, Del. The former Sykesville resident was 85. "He was enthusiastic, positive and very talented," said James Toedtman, who had edited the News American in the 1980s. "He was always a bright light in our newsroom. " "Well, the thing about Stokes that was so good was that you never saw him do anything but smile.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Charles F. "Blackie" Blockston Jr., a merchant mariner who during World War II survived the U-boat sinking of the freighter Carlton and spent three weeks drifting 600 miles in a lifeboat before being rescued, died Aug. 28 of multiple-organ failure at the Veterans Medical Center in downtown Baltimore. The longtime Rosedale resident was 93. Mr. Blockston's wartime adventures began in the engine room of the SS Carlton, a Lykes Brothers Steamship Co. freighter that departed Iceland on May 20, 1942, sailing for the Soviet Arctic port of Murmansk.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
The last time Donald Halverson was on a Liberty ship, he was heading across the Atlantic Ocean, a fresh-faced draftee who would spend the next 21/2 years fighting his way across Germany, France, Italy and North Africa during World War II. A more recent trip, a leisurely six-hour sail down the Chesapeake Bay on the refurbished Liberty ship John W. Brown, a floating museum that has been plying the waters around Baltimore since 1991, proved a lot more...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
Joseph Gordon Donald Jones, a retired Baltimore County police officer who served in the U.S. merchant marine and the Navy during World War II, died April 3 of a kidney infection at Franklin Square Medical Center. The longtime Essex resident was 84. The son of a plumber and a housekeeper, Mr. Jones, who was known as Gordon, was born the fourth of five children in Baltimore, and raised in Essex and the city. He dropped out of city public schools after his father's death in 1941 to help support his family.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- John Brown's last shot came from the fire engine house at the foot of Shenandoah Street; his Bible and a broadsword from Bleeding Kansas are on display in a nearby museum. Nearly 145 years have passed since Brown led 21 raiders on a mission to seize 100,000 guns stored here at the federal arsenal. A militant abolitionist, Brown hoped that runaway slaves would join his "liberation army," which would take refuge in nearby mountains and fight a guerrilla war against slaveholders.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
Their passion is diving below the Atlantic to the wrecks of sunken Liberty ships.And their love for one another was consecrated in marriage yesterday on the deck of the John W. Brown, one of only two American Liberty ships remaining out of 2,710 that carried supplies overseas during World War II.In a light afternoon rain alongside Pier One on Clinton Street, longtime companions Karen Ellen Flynn and Douglas Wilson Newlon took their vows from the Rev. Ramon...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
Thomas R. Gibson, a retired rapid-transit project manager and World War II maritime radio operator who returned to sea as a radioman during the Persian Gulf War, died July 30 of cancer at the Charlestown retirement community. The former Joppa resident was 86. Mr. Gibson, the son of a Northern Pacific railroader and a homemaker, was born and raised in Minneapolis, where he graduated from high school. Mr. Gibson's interest in ham radio began during his high school days and continued when he worked at a radio station in Green Bay, Wis. By 1941, he had earned his radio license from the Federal Communications Commission.
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