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By Bruce W. Hamilton | October 9, 2013
House Speaker Boehner, so the thinking goes, is held hostage by the tea party members of his caucus. They, plus the more moderate House Republicans who fear tea-party primary challenges, form an effective majority of the Republican Caucus (the "majority of the majority," which, when you do the math, is a minority of the House). But it is important to remember that Rep. Boehner's official title is Speaker of the House of Representatives, not Speaker of the Republican Caucus. And therein — possibly — lies a way out of our current mess.
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NEWS
December 21, 2013
Let me get this straight: Capitol Hill, which is filled with $200,000-plus a year politicians - many of them multimillionaires who retire with most of their salary intact and only lose their jobs only if they get voted out of office - is telling our military men and women that they are the ones who have to take a cut in their pensions ( "Senate advances bipartisan budget agreement," Dec. 17)? Who makes the greater sacrifice: Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner dodging each other in the halls of Congress, or our military men and women dodging bullets in the sand pits of the Middle East?
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 27, 2011
I heard someone use the term "moderate Republican" the other day, and I looked around for Mac Mathias. Of course, the great Maryland senator departed this life in January 2010, at the age of 87. He had retired in 1987, having served in Congress for 25 years. Once upon a time, Senator Mathias was aligned with something called the "influential liberal wing of the Republican Party," a phrase you could never conjure today without first doing some herb - and, even then, it would have to be really good stuff.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Thanks to last-minute negotiations between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, the government of the United States open, and the threat that the nation will default on its debts for the first time has lifted, at least for the moment. Faced with a deadline, cool heads prevailed, the national interest was preserved and President Barack Obama's refusal to negotiate while Republicans threatened to torpedo the global economy was validated. But the swift denouement of the shutdown/debt limit crisis begs a big question: Why couldn't this have happened three weeks ago?
NEWS
By JANET HOOK AND FAYE FIORE and JANET HOOK AND FAYE FIORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. John A. Boehner, with his ever-present cigarette, seems like a throwback to the days of Capitol Hill's smoke-filled rooms. He is hip-deep in political contributions from an industry he oversees. He was once scolded for passing out campaign checks from tobacco interests on the House floor. He was booted from a leadership post eight years ago. But with his election yesterday as the new House majority leader, the Ohio Republican has emerged as his party's agent of change in the post-Tom DeLay era. With the GOP eager to put a spate of corruption scandals behind it, the mantle of reform might seem to rest awkwardly on Boehner's shoulders.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Friday's editorial "Boehner holds the key" (July 15) admonishes the Republican leader to "remember that he is speaker of the entire House not just the tea party wing. " I don't recall reading a heading like that when Nancy Pelosi was speaker of the House. She excluded Republicans from meetings that were held behind closed doors. During the Obamacare debate she told them to vote on the bill so they could know what was in it! She ruled with a iron fist. John Boehner is concerned about the welfare of our country and its people.
NEWS
December 21, 2013
Let me get this straight: Capitol Hill, which is filled with $200,000-plus a year politicians - many of them multimillionaires who retire with most of their salary intact and only lose their jobs only if they get voted out of office - is telling our military men and women that they are the ones who have to take a cut in their pensions ( "Senate advances bipartisan budget agreement," Dec. 17)? Who makes the greater sacrifice: Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner dodging each other in the halls of Congress, or our military men and women dodging bullets in the sand pits of the Middle East?
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 7, 2013
Only a few days into the new year, the Grand Old Party has a huge political hangover from the events that rang in the tidings of 2013. First came the escape from the fiscal cliff that saw its speaker of the House, John Boehner, embarrassed by his flock's failure to back his 11th-hour Plan B to avert it. Passing the ball to the Democratic-controlled Senate was an abdication of responsibility. Then Mr. Boehner was hit with surrender of the GOP's never-new-taxes pledge. Worse, the abandonment came with a violation of the party leadership's so-called Hastert rule allowing bills to pass only with a majority of Republican members of the House voting in favor.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Nice try, John Boehner. On Wednesday, the House speaker announced a willingness to work with the newly re-elected President Barack Obama on a long-term solution to the nation's budget problems that avoids January's "fiscal cliff" - and if you didn't listen too closely, it sounded like he was even willing to budge on the GOP's no-new-taxes dogma. In reality, though, Mr. Boehner was more or less recapping the House's position from 2011, the last time he and Mr. Obama engaged in serious discussions on the issue.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
Maura Gillespie turns the corner beside her desk and unlocks a door to the balcony. Laid out below her, perfectly symmetrical, is the National Mall, with the Washington Monument rising like an exclamation point at the end of the expanse. "People say it's the best view in D.C.," says the 22-year-old, who graduated last month from Loyola University Maryland. Strictly speaking, the balcony does not belong to Gillespie. It goes with the office occupied by her boss, John Boehner, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and the highest-ranking Republican in the country.
NEWS
October 11, 2013
The dire effects of the government shutdown reach far beyond the hundreds of thousands of furloughed government workers -- along with all the stores, restaurants and other businesses that rely on them as customers. The shutdown is damaging America's foreign policy in ways that may not be recoverable. The effects are not as immediately apparent today as, say, the closure of the Lincoln Memorial or the Head Start program hiatus. But how is the U.S. going to remain an important player in the world as foreigners observe that we can't even manage our own country?
NEWS
By Bruce W. Hamilton | October 9, 2013
House Speaker Boehner, so the thinking goes, is held hostage by the tea party members of his caucus. They, plus the more moderate House Republicans who fear tea-party primary challenges, form an effective majority of the Republican Caucus (the "majority of the majority," which, when you do the math, is a minority of the House). But it is important to remember that Rep. Boehner's official title is Speaker of the House of Representatives, not Speaker of the Republican Caucus. And therein — possibly — lies a way out of our current mess.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 7, 2013
Only a few days into the new year, the Grand Old Party has a huge political hangover from the events that rang in the tidings of 2013. First came the escape from the fiscal cliff that saw its speaker of the House, John Boehner, embarrassed by his flock's failure to back his 11th-hour Plan B to avert it. Passing the ball to the Democratic-controlled Senate was an abdication of responsibility. Then Mr. Boehner was hit with surrender of the GOP's never-new-taxes pledge. Worse, the abandonment came with a violation of the party leadership's so-called Hastert rule allowing bills to pass only with a majority of Republican members of the House voting in favor.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Nice try, John Boehner. On Wednesday, the House speaker announced a willingness to work with the newly re-elected President Barack Obama on a long-term solution to the nation's budget problems that avoids January's "fiscal cliff" - and if you didn't listen too closely, it sounded like he was even willing to budge on the GOP's no-new-taxes dogma. In reality, though, Mr. Boehner was more or less recapping the House's position from 2011, the last time he and Mr. Obama engaged in serious discussions on the issue.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 27, 2011
I heard someone use the term "moderate Republican" the other day, and I looked around for Mac Mathias. Of course, the great Maryland senator departed this life in January 2010, at the age of 87. He had retired in 1987, having served in Congress for 25 years. Once upon a time, Senator Mathias was aligned with something called the "influential liberal wing of the Republican Party," a phrase you could never conjure today without first doing some herb - and, even then, it would have to be really good stuff.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Friday's editorial "Boehner holds the key" (July 15) admonishes the Republican leader to "remember that he is speaker of the entire House not just the tea party wing. " I don't recall reading a heading like that when Nancy Pelosi was speaker of the House. She excluded Republicans from meetings that were held behind closed doors. During the Obamacare debate she told them to vote on the bill so they could know what was in it! She ruled with a iron fist. John Boehner is concerned about the welfare of our country and its people.
NEWS
October 11, 2013
The dire effects of the government shutdown reach far beyond the hundreds of thousands of furloughed government workers -- along with all the stores, restaurants and other businesses that rely on them as customers. The shutdown is damaging America's foreign policy in ways that may not be recoverable. The effects are not as immediately apparent today as, say, the closure of the Lincoln Memorial or the Head Start program hiatus. But how is the U.S. going to remain an important player in the world as foreigners observe that we can't even manage our own country?
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Thanks to last-minute negotiations between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, the government of the United States open, and the threat that the nation will default on its debts for the first time has lifted, at least for the moment. Faced with a deadline, cool heads prevailed, the national interest was preserved and President Barack Obama's refusal to negotiate while Republicans threatened to torpedo the global economy was validated. But the swift denouement of the shutdown/debt limit crisis begs a big question: Why couldn't this have happened three weeks ago?
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
Maura Gillespie turns the corner beside her desk and unlocks a door to the balcony. Laid out below her, perfectly symmetrical, is the National Mall, with the Washington Monument rising like an exclamation point at the end of the expanse. "People say it's the best view in D.C.," says the 22-year-old, who graduated last month from Loyola University Maryland. Strictly speaking, the balcony does not belong to Gillespie. It goes with the office occupied by her boss, John Boehner, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and the highest-ranking Republican in the country.
NEWS
By JANET HOOK AND FAYE FIORE and JANET HOOK AND FAYE FIORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. John A. Boehner, with his ever-present cigarette, seems like a throwback to the days of Capitol Hill's smoke-filled rooms. He is hip-deep in political contributions from an industry he oversees. He was once scolded for passing out campaign checks from tobacco interests on the House floor. He was booted from a leadership post eight years ago. But with his election yesterday as the new House majority leader, the Ohio Republican has emerged as his party's agent of change in the post-Tom DeLay era. With the GOP eager to put a spate of corruption scandals behind it, the mantle of reform might seem to rest awkwardly on Boehner's shoulders.
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