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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
CHICAGO -- True story: The first official protest at the Democratic National Convention this week starts late because the speaker has to move his car, lest he get a parking ticket. Whatever happened to civil disobedience?Not that anyone in the press corps, which constitutes most of the audience at the protest site, seems to care. They are too busy trailing after the late Abbie Hoffman's son, Andrew, obligingly clad in an American flag shirt, just like his father used to wear, and giving interviews in a soft, hesitant voice, which is not like his father's.
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By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
The Little Italy Open Air Film Festival continues its weekly outdoor movie screenings tonight with Seabiscuit. Red Pollard - Tobey Maguire's first major film role after starring in Spider-Man - is a Depression-era jockey with a broken spirit who finds hope through his exceptional horse, Seabiscuit. One of Seabiscuit's most memorable and inspiring races in the film takes place at Pimlico Race Course. This historical, inspirational and Oscar-nominated movie will be playing at 9 p.m. at High and Stiles streets.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 13, 1994
"Watching worth new much isn't there tonight." That isn't some cryptic piece of existential philosophy; it's just my way of writing the same old lead in a slightly new way. In this case, backward.* "Tom." (8:30-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The way things are going, CBS can't broadcast these new Tom Arnold sitcom episodes quickly enough. If Tom and Roseanne Arnold go the way of Sonny and Cher, it'll be a Sonny day for him -- and his solo career should last about as long. CBS.* "Woman on the Ledge."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
National Lampoon's Van Wilder is a very funny movie ... ... in some alternate universe, maybe. But in this one, it's about as funny as a dog's naughty bits, which, coincidentally, are key to this movie's idea of inspired humor. There's a gross, mean-spirited and excruciatingly long scene involving revenge, cream-filled eclairs and the aforementioned canine parts. If this is your idea of hilarious, read no further; I can be of no help to you at all. Everyone else, be forewarned. Don't be fooled by the National Lampoon name and comic pedigree stretching back to National Lampoon's Animal House, a terrific and truly funny film that managed to be both hilarious and in bad taste.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 10, 1995
The first of the big "foreign" movies to clue blinkered Western audiences into the idea that there was more to filmmaking than the Warner Brothers and that some of the world's best was going on in a defeated enemy's backyard was Akira Kurosawa's "Rashomon," which blasted its way to a world audience in 1951.The second is not nearly so well-remembered, though in many ways it became more of a font for Japanese culture in America than "Rashomon." Among other things, it helped invent John Belushi.
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By ROGER SIMON | September 6, 1993
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Bob Blankfeld, Baltimore: I was recently watching the movie "Continental Divide" in which the late John Belushi plays a newspaper columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times.In one scene, which takes place at a local reporters' hangout, I thought I caught a glimpse of you sitting at the bar. I thought you gave a very realistic performance, and you could have a viable second career in case this newspaper thing doesn't work out.If I'm correct, several questions come to mind:1.
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By John R. Broderick | August 27, 1998
THE ONE recent move that President Clinton made that should surprise absolutely no one was his decision to travel to the island of Martha's Vineyard for rest and, of course, to try to avoid the media questions about Monica Lewinsky and Osama bin Laden.If there is one place on Earth right now where the Clinton family might actually be able to blend into the woodwork, it is this Massachusetts island. About seven miles off Cape Cod, the island is accessible only by boat or by plane.The Clintons, in fact, are following a long tradition of the rich and famous -- or is it infamous?
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By Tamara Ikenberg | June 27, 1998
"Animal House," the ultimate party movie, launched many a Hollywood career.Tom Hulce went on to be nominated for an Academy Award. Kevin Bacon attained pop-culture icon status with his own game. Some, like Karen Allen, enjoyed brief stardom and disappeared off the face of the earth. John Belushi is dead.Here's a sampling of post-grad achievements of "Animal House" vets who went on to tap that elusive keg of stardom. Some came up dry, and others are dizzy with success:Tom Hulce (Larry "Pinto" Kroger)
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By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
The Little Italy Open Air Film Festival continues its weekly outdoor movie screenings tonight with Seabiscuit. Red Pollard - Tobey Maguire's first major film role after starring in Spider-Man - is a Depression-era jockey with a broken spirit who finds hope through his exceptional horse, Seabiscuit. One of Seabiscuit's most memorable and inspiring races in the film takes place at Pimlico Race Course. This historical, inspirational and Oscar-nominated movie will be playing at 9 p.m. at High and Stiles streets.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
National Lampoon's Van Wilder is a very funny movie ... ... in some alternate universe, maybe. But in this one, it's about as funny as a dog's naughty bits, which, coincidentally, are key to this movie's idea of inspired humor. There's a gross, mean-spirited and excruciatingly long scene involving revenge, cream-filled eclairs and the aforementioned canine parts. If this is your idea of hilarious, read no further; I can be of no help to you at all. Everyone else, be forewarned. Don't be fooled by the National Lampoon name and comic pedigree stretching back to National Lampoon's Animal House, a terrific and truly funny film that managed to be both hilarious and in bad taste.
NEWS
By John R. Broderick | August 27, 1998
THE ONE recent move that President Clinton made that should surprise absolutely no one was his decision to travel to the island of Martha's Vineyard for rest and, of course, to try to avoid the media questions about Monica Lewinsky and Osama bin Laden.If there is one place on Earth right now where the Clinton family might actually be able to blend into the woodwork, it is this Massachusetts island. About seven miles off Cape Cod, the island is accessible only by boat or by plane.The Clintons, in fact, are following a long tradition of the rich and famous -- or is it infamous?
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg | June 27, 1998
"Animal House," the ultimate party movie, launched many a Hollywood career.Tom Hulce went on to be nominated for an Academy Award. Kevin Bacon attained pop-culture icon status with his own game. Some, like Karen Allen, enjoyed brief stardom and disappeared off the face of the earth. John Belushi is dead.Here's a sampling of post-grad achievements of "Animal House" vets who went on to tap that elusive keg of stardom. Some came up dry, and others are dizzy with success:Tom Hulce (Larry "Pinto" Kroger)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
"Blues Brothers 2000" doesn't tell much of a story, but it makes for one smokin' concert.A sequel to the blues-soaked car-wreck that was the original "Blues Brothers," it brings back much of the surviving cast from that 1980 film, offers up a flimsy story line about how the surviving brother is dedicated to reviving the act, makes a half-hearted attempt to instill some family values, then sits back and lets the music take control.L Wise move -- one of many this surprisingly deft movie makes.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
CHICAGO -- True story: The first official protest at the Democratic National Convention this week starts late because the speaker has to move his car, lest he get a parking ticket. Whatever happened to civil disobedience?Not that anyone in the press corps, which constitutes most of the audience at the protest site, seems to care. They are too busy trailing after the late Abbie Hoffman's son, Andrew, obligingly clad in an American flag shirt, just like his father used to wear, and giving interviews in a soft, hesitant voice, which is not like his father's.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 10, 1995
The first of the big "foreign" movies to clue blinkered Western audiences into the idea that there was more to filmmaking than the Warner Brothers and that some of the world's best was going on in a defeated enemy's backyard was Akira Kurosawa's "Rashomon," which blasted its way to a world audience in 1951.The second is not nearly so well-remembered, though in many ways it became more of a font for Japanese culture in America than "Rashomon." Among other things, it helped invent John Belushi.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 13, 1994
"Watching worth new much isn't there tonight." That isn't some cryptic piece of existential philosophy; it's just my way of writing the same old lead in a slightly new way. In this case, backward.* "Tom." (8:30-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The way things are going, CBS can't broadcast these new Tom Arnold sitcom episodes quickly enough. If Tom and Roseanne Arnold go the way of Sonny and Cher, it'll be a Sonny day for him -- and his solo career should last about as long. CBS.* "Woman on the Ledge."
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | October 31, 1992
What a three-way race in the presidential parody pool! It pretty much comes down to a dead heat among Dan Aykroyd, Dana Carvey and Phil Hartman, with a swing-vote chance for Chevy Chase.And for first lady, we have to consider Gilda Radner, Laraine Newman, Jan Hooks, Madeline Kahn and Mr. Hartman again.Yes, we're talking the stars, past and present, of NBC's "Saturday Night Live," whose best electoral impersonations are on display tomorrow night in "Saturday Night Live's Presidential Bash."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | May 10, 1991
CHICAGO-- Bob Woodward's books -- on Watergate, the Supreme Court, William Casey, John Belushi -- are usually instructive and always controversial. His new one, ''The Commanders,'' is no exception. Excerpted in Newsweek, it is drawing a great deal of attention to Colin Powell's early attitude toward the gulf war.General Powell is supposed to have felt misgivings about abandoning sanctions for attack, misgivings he suppressed, partially at least, when faced with President Bush's determination to prosecute the war. The New York Times has already made Mr. Woodward's book the basis for an editorial criticizing the president's inhibition of dissenting advice.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 6, 1993
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Bob Blankfeld, Baltimore: I was recently watching the movie "Continental Divide" in which the late John Belushi plays a newspaper columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times.In one scene, which takes place at a local reporters' hangout, I thought I caught a glimpse of you sitting at the bar. I thought you gave a very realistic performance, and you could have a viable second career in case this newspaper thing doesn't work out.If I'm correct, several questions come to mind:1.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 23, 1993
Here comes -- whoops, there went "Coneheads."dTC The new movie, based on an allegedly famous "Saturday Night Live" skit of the '70s about streamlined pointocephalic aliens living in suburban New Jersey, is a sketch haphazardly inflated into an anecdote that never quite becomes a story. Then -- it's over. Occasionally quite amusing, it just doesn't build. An hour later you're hungry to go to the movies.The key question is: Why does this movie exist in the first place?After all, as a sketch, the Coneheads weren't exactly classic stuff and it's difficult to believe anyone is going to rush to the film out of fond nostalgia for what was basically a one-trick pony.
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