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John Barth

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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 2, 2006
From Monday to Thursday, he uses a 43-year-old Parker 51 fountain pen purchased in England to write fiction. Fridays are reserved for a Montblanc fountain pen, a gift from a Spanish friend, to write nonfiction essays. "I always write my first drafts in ink. The flow of ink on paper still pleases me, and as my friend, novelist Anne Tyler, says, it's `muscular cursive,'" said John Barth, a veteran Maryland writer whose first novel, The Floating Opera, was published in 1957. Barth, 76, taught English and creative writing at the Johns Hopkins University for 22 years before he and his wife, Shelly, who was on the faculty of St. Timothy's School for years, retired in 1995.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
The Development by John Barth Houghton Mifflin / 167 pages / $23 Considered a writer's writer, John Barth crams his prose with narrative tricks, literary allusions, figurative language and dirty jokes. Although the results can be head-spinning, they are also funny and tragic - at the same time. Barth's latest book of nine interlocking short stories, The Development, shows him as a master of the form. Barth (winner of the National Book, the PEN/Malamud and the Lannan Foundation Lifetime Achievement awards)
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NEWS
By John Goodspeed | September 17, 1990
THE MUSES OF JOHN BARTH. By Max F. Schulz. Johns Hopkins University Press. 220 pages. $28.95.OF THE 2,000 new books this old reviewer has read and written up over the last 40 years, the present volume is probably the worst. I bring it up only because its subject is the work of John Barth, one of Maryland's most famous fiction writers, pride of the Eastern Shore, and because his name in the title might seduce some of his fans into plunking down its ridiculous retail price, $28.95.See what I'm saying?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 2, 2006
From Monday to Thursday, he uses a 43-year-old Parker 51 fountain pen purchased in England to write fiction. Fridays are reserved for a Montblanc fountain pen, a gift from a Spanish friend, to write nonfiction essays. "I always write my first drafts in ink. The flow of ink on paper still pleases me, and as my friend, novelist Anne Tyler, says, it's `muscular cursive,'" said John Barth, a veteran Maryland writer whose first novel, The Floating Opera, was published in 1957. Barth, 76, taught English and creative writing at the Johns Hopkins University for 22 years before he and his wife, Shelly, who was on the faculty of St. Timothy's School for years, retired in 1995.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | July 14, 1996
Do you? I have eight books (or nine or 10 - depending on my state of mind or recall) that are, I guess, more or less who I am. Their impact, nourishment, instructions and indelibleness have been so powerful that if I were innocent of them I would be, simply, somebody else. Whether those books are good or bad, important or not, is not a judgment I should be trusted to make.Two of them are "The Floating Opera" and "The Sot-Weed Factor." Both are by John Barth, a major Maryland figure but one whom I have never met, which despite my untrustworthiness on the matter of his prior accomplishments may license me to make comment on his umpteenth book, "On With the Story: Stories" (Little, Brown, 257 pages.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
A picture accompanying an article in Saturday's Today section misidentified the river on which John Barth lives. The author lives on the Chester River.The Sun regrets the errors.CHESTERTOWN -- John Barth is a happy man who smiles a lot, likes to talk (and listen) and who looks a little geezerish with his whiskers sticking out at you as he knocks back another belt of a crisp pinot grigio.So what if he's not the literary Wunderkind he once was, and the reviews he receives are not so prominent as they were, or so frequent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
The Development by John Barth Houghton Mifflin / 167 pages / $23 Considered a writer's writer, John Barth crams his prose with narrative tricks, literary allusions, figurative language and dirty jokes. Although the results can be head-spinning, they are also funny and tragic - at the same time. Barth's latest book of nine interlocking short stories, The Development, shows him as a master of the form. Barth (winner of the National Book, the PEN/Malamud and the Lannan Foundation Lifetime Achievement awards)
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 1999
CHESTERTOWN -- John Barth is grinning like an amiable geezer who, after years of tribulation and yearning, has just found his childhood sweetheart. Well, maybe not. But clearly, he radiates, if not happiness, deep intellectual satisfaction, as he pulls up a chair in the local library of this Eastern Shore town, ready to talk.He has just finished the first draft of his new novel. This is the "millennium novel," his creative gesture of welcome to the next span of a thousand years. It is titled "Coming Soon!
FEATURES
June 21, 1998
John Barth (1930-) is a native Marylander, who has been successful in his dual careers as novelist and professor. A former professional drummer, he was educated at the Juilliard School of Music and later attended Johns Hopkins School of music in Baltimore. Many of his novels, including "Lost the Funhouse," a volume of stories 'for Print, Tape and Live Voice'; The Sot-Weed Factor and "Letters" are considered unconventional. Barth is considered one of America's bestselling novelists. Some Barth is best seen as a counter-realist, constructing worlds outside the everyday.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | May 8, 1994
For me, the spirit of Baltimore is summed up by John Waters and John Barth. Movie director John Waters celebrates the "bee-hive capital of the world," that town that gives us both William Donald Schaefer and Divine, a place of refreshing, rather innocent, weirdness and occasionally lovable vulgarity. "Welcome to Baltimore, hon!" and drive-by shootings are equally part of this Baltimore.The Baltimore of novelist John Barth is the lofty Platonic Baltimore of Johns Hopkins University.Both Baltimores may be found in Edgar Allan Poe -- a man profoundly humiliated, unique, very cerebral, and who died literally in the gutter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,Sun Staff | April 4, 2004
The Book of Ten Nights and a Night, by John Barth. Houghton Mifflin. 304 pages, $24. Since the 2001 terrorist attacks, countless writers have confronted the question of how, if at all, to address those world-shaking events in their fiction. But leave it to John Barth to complicate matters -- by fretting about reconciling the attacks with his pre-9 / 11 writing. As Barth's narrative stand-in explains at the outset of this curious potpourri, the author had been planning, before the attacks, to gather in one book 11 previously uncollected short stories, most from the late 1990s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | December 2, 2001
Amid the tumults of 2001, this region's authors and publishers have stayed by their keyboards and their cash-flow charts, producing new books for the general reader. Here is the second half of the annual try at a census of such works, by Marylanders or about Maryland. (S) means softbound; (O), oversize. Critical Studies (cont.) Were They Wise Men or Kings? The Book of Christmas Questions, by Joseph J. Walsh (Westminster John Knox, 128 pages, $18) (S). The origins of favorite stories, beliefs, rituals.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 1999
CHESTERTOWN -- John Barth is grinning like an amiable geezer who, after years of tribulation and yearning, has just found his childhood sweetheart. Well, maybe not. But clearly, he radiates, if not happiness, deep intellectual satisfaction, as he pulls up a chair in the local library of this Eastern Shore town, ready to talk.He has just finished the first draft of his new novel. This is the "millennium novel," his creative gesture of welcome to the next span of a thousand years. It is titled "Coming Soon!
FEATURES
June 21, 1998
John Barth (1930-) is a native Marylander, who has been successful in his dual careers as novelist and professor. A former professional drummer, he was educated at the Juilliard School of Music and later attended Johns Hopkins School of music in Baltimore. Many of his novels, including "Lost the Funhouse," a volume of stories 'for Print, Tape and Live Voice'; The Sot-Weed Factor and "Letters" are considered unconventional. Barth is considered one of America's bestselling novelists. Some Barth is best seen as a counter-realist, constructing worlds outside the everyday.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
A picture accompanying an article in Saturday's Today section misidentified the river on which John Barth lives. The author lives on the Chester River.The Sun regrets the errors.CHESTERTOWN -- John Barth is a happy man who smiles a lot, likes to talk (and listen) and who looks a little geezerish with his whiskers sticking out at you as he knocks back another belt of a crisp pinot grigio.So what if he's not the literary Wunderkind he once was, and the reviews he receives are not so prominent as they were, or so frequent.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | July 14, 1996
Do you? I have eight books (or nine or 10 - depending on my state of mind or recall) that are, I guess, more or less who I am. Their impact, nourishment, instructions and indelibleness have been so powerful that if I were innocent of them I would be, simply, somebody else. Whether those books are good or bad, important or not, is not a judgment I should be trusted to make.Two of them are "The Floating Opera" and "The Sot-Weed Factor." Both are by John Barth, a major Maryland figure but one whom I have never met, which despite my untrustworthiness on the matter of his prior accomplishments may license me to make comment on his umpteenth book, "On With the Story: Stories" (Little, Brown, 257 pages.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1995
John Barth has his opposed sides: the author, the teacher; the retiree, still at work; port and starboard (his home is on land, but at the moment he and his wife are very likely out on the Bay). And further, the heavyweight novelist ("The Floating Opera," "The Sot-Weed Factor," "Chimera") who also publishes very readable nonfiction.Ten years ago, "The Friday Book" was a collection of essays, lectures and papers; Barth explained that his work pattern is fiction four days a week, then Friday for the unimagined life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,Sun Staff | April 4, 2004
The Book of Ten Nights and a Night, by John Barth. Houghton Mifflin. 304 pages, $24. Since the 2001 terrorist attacks, countless writers have confronted the question of how, if at all, to address those world-shaking events in their fiction. But leave it to John Barth to complicate matters -- by fretting about reconciling the attacks with his pre-9 / 11 writing. As Barth's narrative stand-in explains at the outset of this curious potpourri, the author had been planning, before the attacks, to gather in one book 11 previously uncollected short stories, most from the late 1990s.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1995
John Barth has his opposed sides: the author, the teacher; the retiree, still at work; port and starboard (his home is on land, but at the moment he and his wife are very likely out on the Bay). And further, the heavyweight novelist ("The Floating Opera," "The Sot-Weed Factor," "Chimera") who also publishes very readable nonfiction.Ten years ago, "The Friday Book" was a collection of essays, lectures and papers; Barth explained that his work pattern is fiction four days a week, then Friday for the unimagined life.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | May 8, 1994
For me, the spirit of Baltimore is summed up by John Waters and John Barth. Movie director John Waters celebrates the "bee-hive capital of the world," that town that gives us both William Donald Schaefer and Divine, a place of refreshing, rather innocent, weirdness and occasionally lovable vulgarity. "Welcome to Baltimore, hon!" and drive-by shootings are equally part of this Baltimore.The Baltimore of novelist John Barth is the lofty Platonic Baltimore of Johns Hopkins University.Both Baltimores may be found in Edgar Allan Poe -- a man profoundly humiliated, unique, very cerebral, and who died literally in the gutter.
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