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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
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By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Fifty years after "The Addams Family" debuted on TV in black and white, John Astin still has that wild gleam in his eye and the same mischievous grin. With his thick mustache, albeit a white one, he could easily be Gomez Addams in his debonair golden years - minus the eyeliner, pinstriped suit and cigar. Now 84, the veteran actor recently told a rapt audience of student thespians at Glenelg High School what most people familiar with the popular show already suspected - a lot of his personality went into creating the patriarch of one of the oddest families ever on TV. Finding a part of yourself that you can meld into an authentic portrayal of a character is something all actors should pursue, he told the cast of the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts' summer production of the Broadway musical based on the 1964-1966 series.
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By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Johns Hopkins University students scramble to sign up for a coveted spot in the acting and directing classes taught by John Astin. After all, who wouldn't want to study theatrical techniques with a famous actor? Internationally known for his role as Gomez Addams in the 1960s television show "The Addams Family," the Baltimore-born Astin has received Academy Award and Emmy nominations for his work in front of the camera, and also for writing and directing. Perhaps the most meaningful recognition came last December, when it was announced that the university's renovated Merrick Barn theater would now bear his name: The John Astin Theatre.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Johns Hopkins University students scramble to sign up for a coveted spot in the acting and directing classes taught by John Astin. After all, who wouldn't want to study theatrical techniques with a famous actor? Internationally known for his role as Gomez Addams in the 1960s television show "The Addams Family," the Baltimore-born Astin has received Academy Award and Emmy nominations for his work in front of the camera, and also for writing and directing. Perhaps the most meaningful recognition came last December, when it was announced that the university's renovated Merrick Barn theater would now bear his name: The John Astin Theatre.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 16, 2003
At age 73, John Astin has a new career - and it's at his alma mater, back in the town where he was born. Still best known as Gomez Addams, the role he played on ABC's The Addams Family four decades ago, Astin began his career as an actor on and off Broadway. In more recent years he's also been directing, as well as touring his one-man show, Edgar Allan Poe - Once upon a midnight... Beginning tomorrow night, local audiences will be able to see him play the role of the Stage Manager in a production of Thornton Wilder's Our Town, under his direction.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 14, 1995
You can tell it's Christmas time because: 1) Fat guys in red suits are panhandling; 2) Even snow-phobic Baltimoreans are praying for flakes on a certain day; and 3) There are more productions of Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" than Santa has elves.The biggest, glossiest "Christmas Carol" in town is the one at the Mechanic Theatre this week. It also boasts a star -- Baltimore native John Astin, of "The Addams Family" fame -- in the lead role of Ebenezer Scrooge.But first the gloss, then the star.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
This Baltimore native's first movie was "West Side Story." He co-starred in an episode of "The Twilight Zone" with Cliff Robertson. A short film he wrote and directed was nominated for an Oscar. He played a theater critic in a TV series starring Mary Tyler Moore. He's had guest shots on "Night Court" and "Mad About You." And, beginning tomorrow evening, he'll be playing Scrooge at the Morris Mechanic Theater through Sunday.Give up? How about one more clue?He was the original Gomez Addams.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
"Cara mia!" Gomez Addams as Edgar Allan Poe?Yes, John Astin, whose most familiar role was as the patriarch of the Addams family, comes to Baltimore this weekend to portray Edgar Allan Poe.Picturing Astin in the role as Poe somehow works. Perhaps it's because Gomez was certainly a weird and wacky character. And Poe? What can you say about a man who gave the world "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Telltale Heart"? Weird? Yes. Wacky? Some would say, even allowing for his immense talent.So Astin, with his kindly yet slightly crazed eyes, easily makes the jump from Gomez to Poe. Crowds of people have already enjoyed watching him portray the writer.
FEATURES
October 25, 2006
Actors' Talk Discussion at Gardel's Terry Schreiber, a New York-based acting coach whose stu dents have included Edward Norton, Peter Sarsgaard and Gabrielle Carteris, will be at the Cinema Lounge at Gar del's, 29 S. Front St., tonight be ginning at 7 for a discussion and networking. John Astin, who starred as Gomez in The Ad dams Family and teaches acting and theater at the Johns Hop kins University, is expected to be among the many members of the local film community in attendance.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | February 11, 2007
WALKING INTO THE 17th annual Heartfest -- a benefit for Johns Hopkins Hospital's Henry Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease -- the big question was: Where to head first? More than 25 restaurants and caterers had set up shop, with food stations to the right and left. So much to choose from, but everyone found a favorite. "I really like the tortilla soup from Babalu Grill," said Maryland Athletic Club occupational therapist Ann Stocksdale. "The salmon tartare from Vin was delicious," said Michael Guterres, an AAI Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Benjamin Wade spent his dinner hour Tuesday lying on a bed of nails, smiling as a stream of people, including Baltimore's mayor and TV's Gomez Addams, stood on his stomach and posed for pictures. Better known by his stage name, SideShow Bennie, Wade was one of a quartet of performers at Harborplace Tuesday for the official opening of the 32nd Ripley's Believe It or Not Odditorium. Along with his colleagues, Bennie was there to personify the oddities Ripley's has been known for since founder Robert Ripley drew his first Believe It or Not comic panel 94 years ago. Promising an assortment of "the strange, the extraordinary, the bizarre and the unconventionally beautiful," barker and performer Todd Robbins stood outside the Light Street Pavilion, where the Odditorium occupies much of the second floor, and worked the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
It's official: Gomez has own theater. A newly renovated theater in the Johns Hopkins University's Merrick Barn was renamed Saturday in honor of the actor who originated the role on television of Gomez Addams, husband to Morticia and patriarch of one of America's weirdest clans on "The Addams Family. " On hand Saturday night to rename the 104-seat performing space "The John Astin Theatre" after its $210,000 make-over was Astin's close friend, the actor Ed Asner. Astin, a member of the class of 1952, starred in "The Addams Family" from 1964 to 1966, and returned to his alma mater in 2001 to teach acting and directing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Theater audiences are typically faced with no-no's before the action starts — no recording devices of any kind, no picture-taking. Things are a little different at performances of "Bump," a dark comedy currently receiving its premiere production at the Theatre Project . "Flash photography will be encouraged," said playwright Robert Powers with a laugh. Intermittent bursts from cameras or flash-equipped cellphones, which could create something like a paparazzi barrage, fit right in with "Bump.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | February 11, 2007
WALKING INTO THE 17th annual Heartfest -- a benefit for Johns Hopkins Hospital's Henry Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease -- the big question was: Where to head first? More than 25 restaurants and caterers had set up shop, with food stations to the right and left. So much to choose from, but everyone found a favorite. "I really like the tortilla soup from Babalu Grill," said Maryland Athletic Club occupational therapist Ann Stocksdale. "The salmon tartare from Vin was delicious," said Michael Guterres, an AAI Corp.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | November 17, 2006
Aspiring screenwriters, take note! The second annual Baltimore Screenwriters Competition is open to any who submit a feature-length script and the $50 submission fee; winners will be chosen by a jury that includes John Hopkins University faculty member and actor John Astin (The Addams Family) and David Simon, creator of HBO's The Wire. Submit scripts no later than Jan. 16 to the Baltimore Screenwriters Competition, Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, 7 E. Redwood St., Suite 500, Baltimore 21202.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | April 19, 2001
Cone Collection reopens at BMA Beginning this Sunday, the Cone Collection of post-impressionist and modern art can once again be viewed at the Baltimore Museum Art -- in the completely renovated Cone Wing. The 6,600-square-foot gallery space focuses on the museum's world-class collection of 500 works by French master Henri Matisse and also houses more than 100 paintings, sculptures and works on paper by many of the world's most important artists. Celebrate the completion of the two-year, $4 million renovation from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday (the museum is open 11 a.m.-6 p.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith James and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
Mark Twain tale Mark Twain's classic novel The Prince and the Pauper comes to life starting Saturday at the Children's Playhouse of Maryland. This musical version of the story stars identical twins Anthony and William Spinnato of Perry Hall and is directed by Liz Boyer Hunnicutt and Jeff Baker. The Prince and the Pauper is the story of two remarkably similar looking boys from different backgrounds who trade places one day. Performances are on Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 19 at 1 p.m., with an added show at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18. Tickets are $10 for inDividuals, $8 per person for groups and birthday parties.
FEATURES
October 25, 2006
Actors' Talk Discussion at Gardel's Terry Schreiber, a New York-based acting coach whose stu dents have included Edward Norton, Peter Sarsgaard and Gabrielle Carteris, will be at the Cinema Lounge at Gar del's, 29 S. Front St., tonight be ginning at 7 for a discussion and networking. John Astin, who starred as Gomez in The Ad dams Family and teaches acting and theater at the Johns Hop kins University, is expected to be among the many members of the local film community in attendance.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2004
On opening night of Ballet Theatre of Maryland's The Nutcracker, the combination of Dianna Cuatto's original choreography and the live music provided by J. Ernest Green and the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and Chorale created a fresh, joyous and surprisingly exciting ballet. Imaginative use of scrim in the sets added a dreamlike quality to the opening scene and created fantastic Kingdoms of Snow and Sweets that transported the audience back to childhood. Costumes transformed ballerinas into lovely flowers; children into cookies, mice and snowflakes; and older dancers into fairy-tale Arabians and Spaniards.
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