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John Anderson

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By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
Some people say John Anderson has been shucking for so long in Federal Hill's Cross Street Market that his hands are starting to look like oyster shells. "Gosh, I hope not," said Anderson, 64, as he examined his palms, scarred by knife cuts he stitched himself with ultralight fishing line. Anderson works four days a week at Nick's Inner Harbour Seafood, the fish market stall that has turned into a cold-weather weekend party spot. His South Baltimore charm is gentle enough to win him a following of loyal customers, but he's tough enough to pry open oyster shells and not wince when his knife slips.
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SPORTS
November 12, 2009
For the fourth straight year, the Maple Leafs are the NHL's most valuable team, according to Forbes magazine's annual survey. The Leafs are worth $470 million, an increase of 5 percent over last year. They easily are worth more than the next franchise, the Rangers at $416 million, up just 1 percent. The Canadiens are third ($339 million), followed by the Red Wings ($337 million), Flyers ($273 million), Bruins ($271 million) and Blackhawks ($258 million). The Hawks had the biggest rise in value, up 26 percent, followed by the Capitals at 15 percent to $183 million.
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FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
At John Anderson's judo club, the first thing you'd better do is bow to your opponent. Show him some respect. Then throw him to the floor. If all goes well, and you end up, say, propping a knee on his chest, or holding his arm in a position where he must either surrender or break a bone, then stand and bow again - no hard feelings here at the dojo - and later you'll head home refreshed, relaxed and ready to approach life with your head screwed on...
NEWS
May 10, 2007
On May 5, 2007, BLONDINE wife of John Anderson, Jr. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Friday after 8 A.M., where the family will receive friends on Saturday at 11:30 A.M. Funeral will follow at 12.
NEWS
May 10, 2007
On May 5, 2007, BLONDINE wife of John Anderson, Jr. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Friday after 8 A.M., where the family will receive friends on Saturday at 11:30 A.M. Funeral will follow at 12.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
In the first case of its kind in the nation, a Jessup businessman was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison yesterday for selling a candy sweetener to drug dealers who used it to dilute up to $500 million worth of heroin for street sales. John David Anderson, 37, was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by Judge Benson E. Legg after being convicted in December under the drug kingpin law, which until this case had been applied only to people who distribute drugs. Anderson ran a drug paraphernalia business with the help of several family members, including his sister Rachelle Lanett Anderson, 38, of Glen Arm Road in Baltimore County, who was found guilty of aiding and abetting drug trafficking, and sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
December 4, 1996
John B. Anderson, 102, purchasing inspectorJohn B. Anderson, a retired purchasing inspector who worked until he was 80 and participated in fitness programs at age 100, died Nov. 24 in his sleep at his home in Arnold. He was 102.In a 1994 interview in The Sun, Mr. Anderson noted that because of a heart murmur, the Army disqualified him from service during World War I.During World War II, he worked as a purchasing agent for the Navy and a steamship company. He also worked in real estate and sales and retired as a water supply purchasing inspector for New York City in 1973.
SPORTS
November 12, 2009
For the fourth straight year, the Maple Leafs are the NHL's most valuable team, according to Forbes magazine's annual survey. The Leafs are worth $470 million, an increase of 5 percent over last year. They easily are worth more than the next franchise, the Rangers at $416 million, up just 1 percent. The Canadiens are third ($339 million), followed by the Red Wings ($337 million), Flyers ($273 million), Bruins ($271 million) and Blackhawks ($258 million). The Hawks had the biggest rise in value, up 26 percent, followed by the Capitals at 15 percent to $183 million.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 30, 1992
CBS took a poll last week about the three leading presidentialcontenders. It asked voters if they were "favorable," "unfavorable," or "undecided" about them or had "not heard enough" about them to have an opinion.Only 1 percent of the respondents had "not heard enough" about George Bush. Only 6 percent had not heard enough about Bill Clinton. But 55 percent had not heard enough about Ross Perot. So, naturally, CBS invited Perot on its Sunday show, "Face the Nation," thus performing its journalistic task of presenting an important unknown to the public.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 1, 1992
WAITING FOR PEROT, let's get real about third parties and independent presidential candidates in America.They never amount to anything.What, never? Well, hardly ever.In the whole history of truly partisan voting, starting with the Whigs-Democrats clash in 1836 and on through the Republicans-Democrats contests since 1856, the only third parties to win a percentage of the popular vote in even the low double-digits were the Free Soilers in 1848, the Republicans in 1856 (they began as a third party)
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
John Meredith Anderson, a retired State Highway Administration surveyor who worked during the 1970s on a resurvey of the portion of the Mason-Dixon Line between Maryland and Delaware, died of multiple myeloma Friday at his Pasadena home. He was 77. Mr. Anderson was born in Addison, Mich. and raised in the Mount Washington neighborhood. He was a 1948 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended the Johns Hopkins University and Loyola College. He worked for Catalyst Research Corp.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
John W. Anderson, a former Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey salesman, filling station owner and World War II veteran, died of complications from a stroke Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ocean Pines resident was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ednor Gardens, Mr. Anderson graduated from McDonogh School in 1938. He worked for Standard Oil before enlisting in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Mr. Anderson, a bombardier and navigator aboard B-17s, was assigned to a base in North Africa.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
In the first case of its kind in the nation, a Jessup businessman was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison yesterday for selling a candy sweetener to drug dealers who used it to dilute up to $500 million worth of heroin for street sales. John David Anderson, 37, was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by Judge Benson E. Legg after being convicted in December under the drug kingpin law, which until this case had been applied only to people who distribute drugs. Anderson ran a drug paraphernalia business with the help of several family members, including his sister Rachelle Lanett Anderson, 38, of Glen Arm Road in Baltimore County, who was found guilty of aiding and abetting drug trafficking, and sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
At John Anderson's judo club, the first thing you'd better do is bow to your opponent. Show him some respect. Then throw him to the floor. If all goes well, and you end up, say, propping a knee on his chest, or holding his arm in a position where he must either surrender or break a bone, then stand and bow again - no hard feelings here at the dojo - and later you'll head home refreshed, relaxed and ready to approach life with your head screwed on...
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
Some people say John Anderson has been shucking for so long in Federal Hill's Cross Street Market that his hands are starting to look like oyster shells. "Gosh, I hope not," said Anderson, 64, as he examined his palms, scarred by knife cuts he stitched himself with ultralight fishing line. Anderson works four days a week at Nick's Inner Harbour Seafood, the fish market stall that has turned into a cold-weather weekend party spot. His South Baltimore charm is gentle enough to win him a following of loyal customers, but he's tough enough to pry open oyster shells and not wince when his knife slips.
NEWS
December 4, 1996
John B. Anderson, 102, purchasing inspectorJohn B. Anderson, a retired purchasing inspector who worked until he was 80 and participated in fitness programs at age 100, died Nov. 24 in his sleep at his home in Arnold. He was 102.In a 1994 interview in The Sun, Mr. Anderson noted that because of a heart murmur, the Army disqualified him from service during World War I.During World War II, he worked as a purchasing agent for the Navy and a steamship company. He also worked in real estate and sales and retired as a water supply purchasing inspector for New York City in 1973.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | October 6, 1992
EVERY four years they debate the debates -- the presidential and vice presidential debates. Where will they be held? Who will moderate? Who will the panelists be? Who sits where? Who goes first?Baltimore's last presidential debate was preceded by all of these weighty questions. And all of them eventually were answered. The debate came off on schedule Sept. 21, 1980. It might have been a historic evening in the Monumental City but for one thing: Jimmy Carter was a no-show.So Ronald Reagan debated independent candidate John Anderson -- remember him?
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | July 25, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Can you believe it? It's late July already, time to steam some crabs and ponder a trip downyocean. Oh yes, and time to write off Bob Dole.As a serious presidential candidate, poor Senator Dole is history, all the important commentators agree. The leftish ones are mostly relieved, and some of the rightish ones are saying that the senator ought to drop out now and let the Republican convention give the nomination to someone else.Columnist Dave Barry, without taking sides, says this election seems to be between Grumpy and Weepy.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | July 25, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Can you believe it? It's late July already, time to steam some crabs and ponder a trip downyocean. Oh yes, and time to write off Bob Dole.As a serious presidential candidate, poor Senator Dole is history, all the important commentators agree. The leftish ones are mostly relieved, and some of the rightish ones are saying that the senator ought to drop out now and let the Republican convention give the nomination to someone else.Columnist Dave Barry, without taking sides, says this election seems to be between Grumpy and Weepy.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | October 6, 1992
EVERY four years they debate the debates -- the presidential and vice presidential debates. Where will they be held? Who will moderate? Who will the panelists be? Who sits where? Who goes first?Baltimore's last presidential debate was preceded by all of these weighty questions. And all of them eventually were answered. The debate came off on schedule Sept. 21, 1980. It might have been a historic evening in the Monumental City but for one thing: Jimmy Carter was a no-show.So Ronald Reagan debated independent candidate John Anderson -- remember him?
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