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John Allen Muhammad

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NEWS
May 13, 2009
Attorneys for convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad returned to court Tuesday for a third round of appeals, telling a federal appeals panel that Muhammad should not have been allowed to represent himself for two days at the start of his trial. The sniper slayings that terrified the Washington region in 2002 provided the backdrop for the argument before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit. It focused on whether Muhammad deserves a new trial because his attorneys should have told the judge there was evidence he was mentally incompetent to represent himself.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Minutes before convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad was executed Tuesday night in Virginia, he said goodbye to a Baltimore lawyer who had become a trusted confidant. "I love you, brother," Muhammad said, according to the attorney, J. Wyndal Gordon, and Gordon told the condemned man he loved him back. Then Gordon shook Muhammad's hand through the bars and clutched his elbow with his free hand. "I was looking at him in his eyes," he said. "There was just no fear there, like he had resigned to it."
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
Richmond, Va. - -The last thoughts of Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad are contained in a letter that his relatives had said would be read publicly Wednesday but which was kept under wraps instead. Muhammad, 48, remained silent in the execution chamber in Jarratt, Va., on Tuesday night when asked if he wanted to share any final words. Instead, he had given his family a document that he wanted to be made public, and relatives had planned to read it at a news conference Wednesday.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
Richmond, Va. - -The last thoughts of Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad are contained in a letter that his relatives had said would be read publicly Wednesday but which was kept under wraps instead. Muhammad, 48, remained silent in the execution chamber in Jarratt, Va., on Tuesday night when asked if he wanted to share any final words. Instead, he had given his family a document that he wanted to be made public, and relatives had planned to read it at a news conference Wednesday.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 11, 2009
JARRATT, Va. - -A stoically defiant John Allen Muhammad, the sniper who terrified the Washington area in 2002 as he orchestrated 10 fatal and seemingly random shootings, was executed Tuesday night by injection in Virginia's death chamber. Muhammad, 48, was pronounced dead at 9:11 p.m., said Larry Traylor, spokesman for the Virginia Department of Corrections, speaking in a steady drizzle outside the Greensville Correctional Center. Asked for last words, Muhammad, wearing a blue shirt and denim jeans, declined to speak and "did not acknowledge us," Traylor said.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Minutes before convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad was executed Tuesday night in Virginia, he said goodbye to a Baltimore lawyer who had become a trusted confidant. "I love you, brother," Muhammad said, according to the attorney, J. Wyndal Gordon, and Gordon told the condemned man he loved him back. Then Gordon shook Muhammad's hand through the bars and clutched his elbow with his free hand. "I was looking at him in his eyes," he said. "There was just no fear there, like he had resigned to it."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - It's the hottest ticket in town right now, a seat in the tiny courtroom where Washington-area sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad is fighting for his life. And it will take luck - not money - to snag one. Courtroom 10 stretches back just five rows, with seating for 50 spectators. Many of the spaces are reserved for the media and for members of the sniper task force. But a lottery system is giving anyone who is interested a chance to grab one of five spots available to the public for each day of the trial, which could last four to six weeks.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel and Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - One truckload of evidence. Five new metal detectors. Ten new sheriff's deputies. Seventy concrete barriers around the courthouse - and enough deluxe portable toilets to handle a press corps of presidential proportions. The trial of sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad begins Tuesday in Virginia Beach, and the preparations have gone far beyond assembling the evidence and witnesses to prove his guilt or innocence. Lawyers and law enforcement authorities are facing all sorts of other pressing questions, such as: Where do you store the evidence in Virginia Beach?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 11, 2009
JARRATT, Va. - -A stoically defiant John Allen Muhammad, the sniper who terrified the Washington area in 2002 as he orchestrated 10 fatal and seemingly random shootings, was executed Tuesday night by injection in Virginia's death chamber. Muhammad, 48, was pronounced dead at 9:11 p.m., said Larry Traylor, spokesman for the Virginia Department of Corrections, speaking in a steady drizzle outside the Greensville Correctional Center. Asked for last words, Muhammad, wearing a blue shirt and denim jeans, declined to speak and "did not acknowledge us," Traylor said.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
May 13, 2009
Attorneys for convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad returned to court Tuesday for a third round of appeals, telling a federal appeals panel that Muhammad should not have been allowed to represent himself for two days at the start of his trial. The sniper slayings that terrified the Washington region in 2002 provided the backdrop for the argument before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit. It focused on whether Muhammad deserves a new trial because his attorneys should have told the judge there was evidence he was mentally incompetent to represent himself.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - It's the hottest ticket in town right now, a seat in the tiny courtroom where Washington-area sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad is fighting for his life. And it will take luck - not money - to snag one. Courtroom 10 stretches back just five rows, with seating for 50 spectators. Many of the spaces are reserved for the media and for members of the sniper task force. But a lottery system is giving anyone who is interested a chance to grab one of five spots available to the public for each day of the trial, which could last four to six weeks.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel and Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - One truckload of evidence. Five new metal detectors. Ten new sheriff's deputies. Seventy concrete barriers around the courthouse - and enough deluxe portable toilets to handle a press corps of presidential proportions. The trial of sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad begins Tuesday in Virginia Beach, and the preparations have gone far beyond assembling the evidence and witnesses to prove his guilt or innocence. Lawyers and law enforcement authorities are facing all sorts of other pressing questions, such as: Where do you store the evidence in Virginia Beach?
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. -- When sniper suspects Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad face trial this fall on capital murder charges in Virginia, it will be in part under an untested law written to snare the likes of Osama bin Laden. Enacted in response to the Sept. 11 attacks, Virginia's anti-terrorism law targeted al-Qaida and similar groups, and their operatives. It makes a murder defendant eligible for execution if the killing was intended to influence the government or intimidate the public.
NEWS
January 10, 2004
A Virginia judge yesterday postponed the formal sentencing of convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad from Feb. 12 to March 10, the same day teen-age sniper Lee Boyd Malvo will be sentenced. A jury recommended in November that Muhammad be put to death for masterminding the sniper rampage that left 10 dead and three wounded in the Washington region in the fall of 2002. Muhammad's final sentence will be set by Judge LeRoy F. Millette Jr., who has the option of reducing the sentence to life in prison.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. -- When sniper suspects Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad face trial this fall on capital murder charges in Virginia, it will be in part under an untested law written to snare the likes of Osama bin Laden. Enacted in response to the Sept. 11 attacks, Virginia's anti-terrorism law targeted al-Qaida and similar groups, and their operatives. It makes a murder defendant eligible for execution if the killing was intended to influence the government or intimidate the public.
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