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NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | July 4, 2013
If the name of any Founding Father crosses our minds on the Fourth of July, it's probably not John Adams'. The second U.S. president rarely gets mentioned alongside Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, the founders we associate with Independence Day . Adams? He was the surly, vainglorious brains behind the scenes who was (as the White House's website suggests) "more remarkable as a political philosopher" than as a leader. Amid the Olympian fireworks of the Founding Fathers, Adams was more of a sparkler.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
An 18-year-old motorcyclist was killed after leaving the road and striking a light pole in Nottingham Wednesday, police said. Police identified the motorcyclist as John Adam Corvin Jr., of the 2100 block of Taylor Ave., in Parkville. Corvin had been driving east on Rossville Boulevard approaching Rolling View Avenue just after 12:30 p.m., when he lost control of his 1999 Suzuki 650 and crashed into the pole, police said. He was declared dead at the scene. Baltimore County Police Crash Team is investigating.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opened its 2013-2014 season Friday night with a burst of sax and violence. Of particular note was the U.S. premiere of the Saxophone Concerto by eminent American composer John Adams, who has given the small repertoire of concertos for that instrument a huge boost with this half-hour work. Co-commissioned by the BSO, the Saint Louis Symphony, Sao Paulo Symphony and Sydney Symphony (which gave the world premiere last month with the composer conducting)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
A year after 9/11, the New York Philharmonic premiered "On the Transmigration of Souls," a reflective work for chorus and orchestra by John Adams that incorporates words and phrases from messages posted near the site of the World Trade Center, from interviews with survivors and, most chillingly, from a flight attendant on one of the doomed planes. To follow such a somber work, the Philharmonic's then-music director Lorin Maazel chose music of solidarity and joy, Beethoven's Symphony No. 9. This pairing seemed just right to me when I heard that Philharmonic concert almost 12 years ago. It seemed just as right, just as effective, when Marin Alsop led the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in this same pairing on Thursday night at Meeryhoff Hall to close the 2013-2014 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and By Joseph R. L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | May 20, 2001
"John Adams," by David McCullough. Simon & Schuster. 749 pages. $35. Bracketed by those Mount Rushmore colossi, Washington and Jefferson, President John Adams finally gets the laudatory and accessible biography he deserves. For two centuries, he has been criticized, disparaged and often ignored by generations of historians and scribblers -- this despite his prodigious labors in the creation of this republic, No other of our foundation fathers, not a one, can match the breadth of his record as the driving force behind the Declaration of Independence, as chairman of the Board of War in organizing the great rebellion, as a top negotiator in securing Britain's recognition of American freedom and as a president who avoided what could have been a disastrous all-out conflict with France.
NEWS
December 13, 2003
Robert John Adams, an expert on radar antennas who worked for more than three decades at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, died of Parkinson's disease Dec. 5 at his Hamilton home. He was 88. Dr. Adams was born and raised in Solon, Iowa, and earned his bachelor's degree in physics in 1936 from the State University of Iowa. In 1941, he earned a doctorate in physics from the University of Wisconsin. After working two years in the physics laboratory at Corning Glass Works in Corning, N.Y., Dr. Adams joined the naval research facility's radar branch as head of the antenna section.
NEWS
March 12, 2003
John Adams Boyd Sr., a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. technician, died of kidney failure Thursday at his home in Englewood, Fla., where he moved 12 years ago. The former Linthicum resident was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised in Linthicum Heights, Mr. Boyd was a 1940 graduate of Glen Burnie High School. He was a Navy chief petty officer and served during World War II and the Korean War. For more than 41 years, he was an electrical technician with BGE at its Front Street operation.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 22, 2008
History was made on several fronts at the 60th Primetime Emmy Awards last night. The HBO miniseries John Adams surpassed the 2003 HBO production Angels in America to become the most honored long form program in TV history. Meanwhile, AMC's Mad Men, a stylish series about life on Madison Avenue in the 1960s, became the first basic cable program to win as best drama. And then came writer-actress Tina Fey and the series she created, NBC's 30 Rock, dominating the comedy category like no other sitcom in years as it took home awards for best writing, best actress, best actor and best comedy.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 16, 2008
The leading man is a short, bald, pot-bellied lawyer with a passion for reading Latin and a habit of making enemies. The leading lady quotes Shakespeare, dresses modestly and seldom looks like she's having fun. The opening hour unfolds against a backdrop of mud, snow and the endless gray of a New England winter. And all seven hours are filled with talk in historically accurate English accents about big ideas from the 18th century like life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This is not exactly the stuff of which TV miniseries are usually made.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | October 4, 2007
During a "Composers in Conversation" appearance last week before an attentive audience at Theatre Project, John Adams offered revealing glimpses into his life, his music and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program he will conduct this week. He also dropped a little verbal incendiary. "There are a lot of composers today," Adams said, "just not a lot of original ones. You could count the number of great composers today on half a hand." Ouch. That declaration may have seemed a little surprising coming from the soft-spoken, gray-haired Adams, dressed in the earth-tone casual you'd expect from a man long and happily based in Berkeley, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opened its 2013-2014 season Friday night with a burst of sax and violence. Of particular note was the U.S. premiere of the Saxophone Concerto by eminent American composer John Adams, who has given the small repertoire of concertos for that instrument a huge boost with this half-hour work. Co-commissioned by the BSO, the Saint Louis Symphony, Sao Paulo Symphony and Sydney Symphony (which gave the world premiere last month with the composer conducting)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
After a brief hiatus that had people feeling downcast all over the globe, Midweek Madness returns with a nod to the opening of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2013-14 subscription series . The big news of the concert is the US premiere of John Adams' Saxophone Concerto, but there's something else a little newsy about it. An old war horse,Tchaikovsky '1812 Overture,' mostly confined these days to pops concerts or outdoor patriotic events, will...
NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | July 4, 2013
If the name of any Founding Father crosses our minds on the Fourth of July, it's probably not John Adams'. The second U.S. president rarely gets mentioned alongside Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, the founders we associate with Independence Day . Adams? He was the surly, vainglorious brains behind the scenes who was (as the White House's website suggests) "more remarkable as a political philosopher" than as a leader. Amid the Olympian fireworks of the Founding Fathers, Adams was more of a sparkler.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Congress' inability to agree on matters of import isn't exactly a new phenomenon, but the Colonial Players' current production of the musical "1776" reminds us that fiery debate has been a part of our nation from the outset. Sherman Edwards' 1969 Tony Award winner for best musical, with book by Peter Stone, chronicles the vote for independence by the Continental Congress in the summer of 1776. Director Beth Terranova says the musical reveals "the enormity of the task our founding fathers set out for themselves.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
Martin Van Buren was not the only sitting vice president elected president during the 19th century ("President Biden? History says no," Feb. 2). Thomas Jefferson achieved the same distinction when, as vice president at the start of the century, he defeated and succeeded the incumbent president John Adams - even though that election was ultimately decided by the U.S. House of Representatives due to a tied electoral vote between Jefferson and Aaron...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Dr. John E. Adams, a pathologist who chaired the department of pathology at Greater Baltimore Medical Center for more than two decades after its founding and was a leading expert in bioethics, died July 9 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Timonium resident was 82. "He influenced a lot of people, myself included. He was a seminal figure in my life and a role model for so many people," said Dr. Ronald L. Sirota, who worked with Dr. Adams at GBMC from 1979 to 1983.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2001
One hundred and seventy-five years after his death, John Adams, that short, stout, irascible and talkative "Colossus of Independence," has suddenly popped up as America's hottest president. Adams died on the Fourth of July 1826, 50 years after he signed the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. Traditionally, his last words were: "Jefferson still survives." But Thomas Jefferson had already died a few hours earlier at Monticello, his Virginia home. For 200 years, Adams has been overshadowed by Jefferson - and most of the rest of the Founding Fathers.
NEWS
August 29, 2003
On August 27, 2003 ROBERT JOHN ADAMS of Severna Park; beloved husband of Marion Hulse Adams; devoted father of Thomas John Adams, Barbara M. Wood, Robert Jeffery Adams and Janet Lee Bartlett; loving son of Edward and Estelle Adams; dear brother of Donald Adams and Lawrence Ned Adams. Also survived by 11 grandchildren and one late grand daughter. Friends may call at the BARRANCO & SONS, P.A., SEVERNA PARK FUNERAL HOME, Ritchie Highway at Robinson Rd. on Firday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Service Saturday 10 A.M. at the Church of Jeues Christ L.D.S.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 2, 2009
In April, after the Senate, buckling under the threat of a presidential veto, failed to pass a law that would close a loophole and allow women to sue for equal pay, an outraged Sen. Barbara Mikulski took the floor to speak. "Many people have been mesmerized by the John Adams miniseries," said the Maryland Democrat. "I like John Adams, but I really like Abigail. "While John Adams was down in Philadelphia writing the Declaration of Independence and laying the groundwork for the Constitution and inventing America, Abigail Adams wrote her husband from the farm - while raising the four children and keeping the family going.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2008
Pasadena Theatre Company, showing a good sense of timing or a little bit of luck, scheduled in the middle of an election season a musical chronicling the vote for independence by the Continental Congress in the summer of 1776. The theater group knew about the historical parallels between the 1969 Broadway opening when Americans were divided over the Vietnam War and the present political divisions over Iraq, but it is unlikely to have anticipated the wrangling in Congress over the financial crisis during this musical's opening week.
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