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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Two bombs exploded in Johannesburg and two others were disarmed, including one outside police headquarters, in the latest terrorist campaign to hit the city, police said yesterday.No one took responsibility for the bombings, in which 11 people were injured, and police said they had no indication who was responsible."We deplore the attacks on these civilian targets in the strongest terms possible," said Capt. Eugene Opperman, a police spokesman.He described the bombs used in each incident as limpet mines, but added, "The old weapons which we referred to as terrorist weapons are now available to anyone, especially in the black townships."
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NEWS
By Paul Salopek and Paul Salopek,Chicago Tribune | June 3, 2007
JOHANNESBURG -- American military personnel and their Somali allies were sifting through the aftermath of a battle with suspected Islamist militants in Somalia yesterday, a day after the U.S. Navy bombarded that nation's hilly shoreline with high explosives. Investigators have found the bodies of at least eight fighters -- including one carrying a U.S. passport, a senior Somali official said. "We have found an American, British, Swedish and some Middle Eastern passports on the corpses," said Hassan Dahir Mohamoud, the vice president of Puntland, a semi-autonomous state in northern Somalia where the fighting took place.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | December 3, 1990
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A black man was buried yesterday in Johannesburg's all-white municipal cemetery, striking a blow in death for the cause of desegregation he had supported in life.David Tshoga, 26, who died two weeks ago when police fired on demonstrators at an open-housing march, became the first black to be buried in West Park Cemetery.He was a member of an open-housing organization that campaigns for an end to the Group Areas Act, which segregates residential areas in South Africa.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 19, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- It's Friday afternoon, and that means Daniel Chitungwiza is putting another package of rice, cooking oil and other basics on the overnight bus to his beleaguered mother and brothers back home in Zimbabwe. "They won't die without it," he said of the weekly shipments from South Africa, "but they will be hungry." As once-prosperous Zimbabwe's seven-year economic slide deepens, legions of expatriates like Chitungwiza are keeping their families afloat. They regularly send staples that their relatives - amid a 1,700 percent annual inflation rate - can no longer afford or even find on bare store shelves.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 28, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- First the sidewalk hawkers were forcibly moved from the streets that they constantly littered and ordered to trade in a regulated market area.Then, the illegally parked mobile kitchens used as informal restaurants supplying potjie (meat and potato hotpot), boerewors (sausages) and mealie maize (corn meal) to the sidewalk masses were seized.Next, the police staged a massive raid on Hillbrow, the most drug-ravaged and dangerous section of town, arresting illegal aliens for running illicit businesses from prostitution to drug peddling, and seizing drugs, weapons and stolen property.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 18, 1995
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- They came by trains that had traveled all through the night, by buses that yesterday had left black townships before dawn, finally to reach the infield of a suburban horse racing track to celebrate Mass in a mixture of languages and traditions with Pope John Paul II.After drums pounded out an African rhythm and choirs sang in Zulu, the pope offered a message of peace as he celebrated the public Mass and later offered a message...
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,[Special to the Sun ] | November 5, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA // When my husband and I moved to the heart of South Africa from Baltimore, we were terrified. We had heard stories about big, bad, scary Johannesburg and kept our eyes peeled for attackers with AK-47s. We locked and double locked our doors. We lived behind a security wall and kept our electric fence on. We had come to post-apartheid South Africa for my husband's work as a foreign correspondent for The Sun and accepted that living in Johannesburg was part of the deal.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Though the promise remains largely unfulfilled, Charles Chinedu regards his stretch of sidewalk downtown on Jeppe Street as a small part of the Promised Land. Unemployment in South Africa hovers at 40 percent, crime remains rampant, but street hawkers keep arriving. Chinedu, a Nigerian who runs an unlicensed phone booth selling phone time for 30 cents a minute, is part of that growth industry. "I thought I would meet my dreams," he says, gesturing at the two touch-tone phones set up on a table in front of his dilapidated apartment building.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 22, 2005
LONEHILL, South Africa - The turning point for this suburb north of Johannesburg came when a carjacker fired 70 rounds from an assault rifle into Steve Parrymore's silver BMW, wounding him in the stomach, right shoulder and legs. That attack five years ago convinced residents of Lonehill that they could not rely on police and instead needed a private security firm with a control room in the heart of the suburb and dozens of guards and a fleet of cars. Crime is a major issue for South Africans of all races, one of the legacies of apartheid having made the gap between rich and poor into a chasm.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 30, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- It is called the Wall of Remembrance, but would more accurately be known as the Wall of Murder.The 42 faces that stare from the white brick background are all victims of the assassin's bullet or knife in murders around this troubled city. Another 50 portraits are to be added to the wall, which, since it was created three weeks ago, has become a landmark of both grief and anger for a population traumatized by violent crime.Like the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, the Wall of Remembrance in Johannesburg has become a place of pilgrimage, where families and friends mourn their losses, and ordinary citizens pause to ponder what has gone wrong with a society so recently and happily freed from the evils of apartheid only to find itself living closer to terror.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun Foreign Reporter | December 4, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Hendrik Verwoerd Drive is headed for the dustbin. The busy road, named after a key architect of the apartheid laws that oppressed South Africa's black majority for decades, is likely to get a name more in step with the times: Nkululeko Drive, the Zulu word for "freedom." Hans Langa, 60, a black street trader who was 12 when Verwoerd became prime minister in 1958, couldn't be happier. "It's our freedom, you see. Things must be changed from the past for the new system," Langa said.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,[Special to the Sun ] | November 5, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA // When my husband and I moved to the heart of South Africa from Baltimore, we were terrified. We had heard stories about big, bad, scary Johannesburg and kept our eyes peeled for attackers with AK-47s. We locked and double locked our doors. We lived behind a security wall and kept our electric fence on. We had come to post-apartheid South Africa for my husband's work as a foreign correspondent for The Sun and accepted that living in Johannesburg was part of the deal.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 9, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa's former deputy president was acquitted yesterday of charges of raping an HIV-positive family friend, a verdict that sent thousands of his ardent supporters dancing into the streets, hoping for his political comeback. But Jacob Zuma, deputy head of the ruling African National Congress, who has made clear he still harbors ambitions to lead South Africa, faces a trial on corruption charges in two months. To a growing number of South Africans, the man who once led both the National AIDS Council and its Moral Regeneration Movement looks, despite his rape acquittal, like a man with appallingly bad judgment.
FEATURES
By MOIRA MACDONALD and MOIRA MACDONALD,SEATTLE TIMES | March 24, 2006
Less than 24 hours after winning an Oscar for best foreign language film, Gavin Hood is on the phone from Los Angeles. Asked how he's doing, he chuckles, in a voice raspy from a long night of celebration. "I'd lie if I said it wasn't good," he says. Hood's film, Tsotsi (pronounced "SOT-see") was the first from South Africa to win an Academy Award - and a signal of hope to its small but burgeoning local film industry, and to the many people who worked to get Tsotsi made. But as Hood raced to the podium on March 5, he was confronted with a roadblock as formidable as anything he faced while making the movie: a ticking clock.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | January 16, 2006
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Khalo Matabane, a filmmaker, talks of what he calls "a funny incident" of his own making at a restaurant in the well-to-do, mostly white Johannesburg neighborhood of Parkhurst. On his way to the restroom, he crossed paths with a white woman he didn't know. They made eye contact and, he says, he blurted: "I know I am everything you despise -- drug dealer, rapist, serial killer. But I've changed. The only thing I do now is sell drugs." It was a provocation, like the best of his low-budget semidocumentary films that show South Africans' long-lived unease with issues of race, crime and foreigners -- films steadily winning favorable attention in South Africa and abroad.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Though the promise remains largely unfulfilled, Charles Chinedu regards his stretch of sidewalk downtown on Jeppe Street as a small part of the Promised Land. Unemployment in South Africa hovers at 40 percent, crime remains rampant, but street hawkers keep arriving. Chinedu, a Nigerian who runs an unlicensed phone booth selling phone time for 30 cents a minute, is part of that growth industry. "I thought I would meet my dreams," he says, gesturing at the two touch-tone phones set up on a table in front of his dilapidated apartment building.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 25, 2001
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The last time snow fell on this city was September 10, 1981. And you can just about count on one hand the number of days in the 20th century residents here saw any snow. For the city's aspiring snowboarders, this would appear to be enough discouragement to keep them playing cricket, soccer or that other favorite pastime of South Africans, rugby. But Johannesburg thrill-seekers are a determined bunch. After looking around and not finding anything to match the Alps or Rockies and no blizzards in the forecast, they lug their snowboards to the tops of the highest points in the city - giant, yellowish heaps of gold-mine waste - and let gravity take care of the rest.
NEWS
September 6, 2002
POOR COLIN Powell. The secretary of state jetted to Johannesburg this week during the final hours of the World Summit on Sustainable Development -- and promptly got jeered by a hostile crowd while trying to explain this country's environmental goals and record. The United States does not deserve this kind of humiliation. Yet it got it in Johannesburg because this country allowed itself to be branded as the home of Ugly Americanism, a stereotype outsiders were only too eager to embrace.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 22, 2005
LONEHILL, South Africa - The turning point for this suburb north of Johannesburg came when a carjacker fired 70 rounds from an assault rifle into Steve Parrymore's silver BMW, wounding him in the stomach, right shoulder and legs. That attack five years ago convinced residents of Lonehill that they could not rely on police and instead needed a private security firm with a control room in the heart of the suburb and dozens of guards and a fleet of cars. Crime is a major issue for South Africans of all races, one of the legacies of apartheid having made the gap between rich and poor into a chasm.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 27, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - When Peter-Paul Ngwenya, executive chairman of Makana Investment Corp. decided to buy a new car last month, he paid cash for a BMW 5-Series and had the dealer deliver the gleaming automobile to the front door of his spacious home nestled in the formerly all-white Johannesburg suburb of Fourways. When he was handed the keys, Ngwenya says, he had to pinch himself to believe how his fortunes had changed. Born in a black township during the most oppressive days of apartheid, he grew up smuggling grenades, AK-47s and bombs for the struggle against white rule before getting caught and banished to Robben Island prison, where he dreamt of political freedom, not the economic success he enjoys today.
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