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By Daniel Schlosberg and Daniel Schlosberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2000
Did Clara Schumann have an affair with Johannes Brahms? Acclaimed pianist Ruth Laredo thinks she knows the answer, although other experts vigorously disagree. "They had a torrid love affair," Laredo said. "There's no way they couldn't have." It's one of the topics she'll address in her "concert with commentary" Friday night at the University of Maryland, College Park. Laredo started giving this type of recital, which mixes performance with anecdotes about the composers' lives, at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1980.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
When Johannes Brahms set about composing a requiem to commemorate his mother, he aimed for something that was more about comforting than crying, more about coming to terms than fretting about whatever judgment might await the dead. The result, "Ein Deutsches Requiem" ("A German Requiem"), is one of the glories of the choral repertoire, one of Brahms' most personal and affecting pieces. Melinda O'Neal, in her final concert as artistic director of the Handel Choir of Baltimore, conducted an impressive performance of the Requiem Sunday afternoon that communicated its bittersweet lyricism and the ingenious cohesion of its architectural shape.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | March 31, 1993
Chock full of intricate counterpoint and enough extended phrases to send even experienced singers and wind players into pulmonary arrest, the "German Requiem" of Johannes Brahms is one of the true challenges of the choral repertoire.Sunday afternoon, the combined choirs and glee clubs of the Naval Academy, Haverford and Bryn Mawr colleges and the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra met that challenge admirably in a concert at Alumni Hall.Composed while Brahms was grieving for his mother and his dear friend Robert Schumann, "Ein deutsches Requiem" is a deeply personal work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2009
SATURDAY Free kids' show Don't miss the kids' show Cantare Muchas Melodias, which features Latina musicians Patricia Vergara and Cecilia Esquivel, who play Latin-American music in this bilingual show, which runs from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. Tickets are free. Call 410-276-1651 or go to creativealliance.org. Family fun fair Head to the family-friendly event "Keep Your Cool Family Fun Fair" in Druid Hill Park, off Druid Park Drive, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, and enjoy rides, games, moon bounces, climbing walls, relay races and lots more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 23, 2003
Artists often deal with death by creating more art -- and thus more life. That's what Johannes Brahms did after he lost his mother. The result was Ein Deutches Requiem (A German Requiem), a work of exquisite beauty and comfort. The title refers only to the fact that the music is sung in German; the texts come from the Bible and, in keeping with the composer's somewhat nonspecific religious outlook, are more universal than denominational. This choral masterwork will be performed this week by the Concert Artists of Baltimore, the choral / orchestral organization directed by Edward Polo-chick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
When Johannes Brahms set about composing a requiem to commemorate his mother, he aimed for something that was more about comforting than crying, more about coming to terms than fretting about whatever judgment might await the dead. The result, "Ein Deutsches Requiem" ("A German Requiem"), is one of the glories of the choral repertoire, one of Brahms' most personal and affecting pieces. Melinda O'Neal, in her final concert as artistic director of the Handel Choir of Baltimore, conducted an impressive performance of the Requiem Sunday afternoon that communicated its bittersweet lyricism and the ingenious cohesion of its architectural shape.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2009
SATURDAY Free kids' show Don't miss the kids' show Cantare Muchas Melodias, which features Latina musicians Patricia Vergara and Cecilia Esquivel, who play Latin-American music in this bilingual show, which runs from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. Tickets are free. Call 410-276-1651 or go to creativealliance.org. Family fun fair Head to the family-friendly event "Keep Your Cool Family Fun Fair" in Druid Hill Park, off Druid Park Drive, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, and enjoy rides, games, moon bounces, climbing walls, relay races and lots more.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | February 15, 1991
The circumstances at Maryland Hall Saturday evening seemed propitious for an exciting musical experience.Tickets for the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra had sold out. Beethoven's last and most expansive piano concerto, the "Emperor," shared the bill with the monumental Symphony No. 1 of Johannes Brahms.Gisele Ben-Dor, the resident conductor of the Houston Symphony and recently named music director of the ProArte Orchestra of Boston, was at the podium.Pianist Alexander Peskanov, who had wowed ASO audiences with a wild and woolly Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3 some years back, was on hand to collaborate in the "Emperor."
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1994
The Concert Artists of Baltimore under Edward Polochick opened its season Saturday night with a reverse history of the Romantic era.Mr. Polochick titled his program "Words and Music." The various staging shifts at LeClerc Hall at the College of Notre Dame at times resembled well-rehearsed confusion, but the musical rewards were very clear and at times revelatory.Edward Polochick is a conductor who tries to inspire his musicians from the podium. He is best with his singers. They watch his every move and seem in tune with his conception of the music.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | June 25, 1993
You say you dazzle your soap dish with your shower-time arias, but always have wondered what a real singer would say about your voice? Perhaps the Annapolis Chorale can help.If you've ever had a hankering to sing Renaissance madrigals until you've "fa la la'ed" your way into oblivion, the Annapolis Chorale has some summer suggestions for you.And if you'd just as soon forget vocal music altogether and go bowling instead, well, the chorale can help you with that, too.It will be a busy summer for conductor Ernest Green and his Carnegie-bound Annapolis Chorale.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 6, 2005
Maybe classical music is struggling to survive, but you'd never guess that looking at all the performances scheduled around here in the months ahead. The new season hasn't even shifted into high gear, and already there's an abundance of events. Take a look at this weekend. Two new chamber music ventures will be launched, both in the elegant ambience of historic mansions and, as it happens, both on the same afternoon. (The frequency of calendar overload on the local music scene gets worse every year.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2004
Anne Arundel County's fine arts performance season has begun, not with a trickle but with a deluge. The Londontowne Symphony began its second season at Southern High School on Friday with a program of works by Faure, Haydn, Vaughan Williams and Mozart. Richard Scerbo, a Southern alumnus and recent graduate of the University of Maryland's conducting program, provided workmanlike leadership from the podium with marvelous music that placed Londontowne's strengths squarely in the spotlight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 23, 2003
Artists often deal with death by creating more art -- and thus more life. That's what Johannes Brahms did after he lost his mother. The result was Ein Deutches Requiem (A German Requiem), a work of exquisite beauty and comfort. The title refers only to the fact that the music is sung in German; the texts come from the Bible and, in keeping with the composer's somewhat nonspecific religious outlook, are more universal than denominational. This choral masterwork will be performed this week by the Concert Artists of Baltimore, the choral / orchestral organization directed by Edward Polo-chick.
FEATURES
By Daniel Schlosberg and Daniel Schlosberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2000
Did Clara Schumann have an affair with Johannes Brahms? Acclaimed pianist Ruth Laredo thinks she knows the answer, although other experts vigorously disagree. "They had a torrid love affair," Laredo said. "There's no way they couldn't have." It's one of the topics she'll address in her "concert with commentary" Friday night at the University of Maryland, College Park. Laredo started giving this type of recital, which mixes performance with anecdotes about the composers' lives, at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1980.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1994
The Concert Artists of Baltimore under Edward Polochick opened its season Saturday night with a reverse history of the Romantic era.Mr. Polochick titled his program "Words and Music." The various staging shifts at LeClerc Hall at the College of Notre Dame at times resembled well-rehearsed confusion, but the musical rewards were very clear and at times revelatory.Edward Polochick is a conductor who tries to inspire his musicians from the podium. He is best with his singers. They watch his every move and seem in tune with his conception of the music.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | June 25, 1993
You say you dazzle your soap dish with your shower-time arias, but always have wondered what a real singer would say about your voice? Perhaps the Annapolis Chorale can help.If you've ever had a hankering to sing Renaissance madrigals until you've "fa la la'ed" your way into oblivion, the Annapolis Chorale has some summer suggestions for you.And if you'd just as soon forget vocal music altogether and go bowling instead, well, the chorale can help you with that, too.It will be a busy summer for conductor Ernest Green and his Carnegie-bound Annapolis Chorale.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2004
Anne Arundel County's fine arts performance season has begun, not with a trickle but with a deluge. The Londontowne Symphony began its second season at Southern High School on Friday with a program of works by Faure, Haydn, Vaughan Williams and Mozart. Richard Scerbo, a Southern alumnus and recent graduate of the University of Maryland's conducting program, provided workmanlike leadership from the podium with marvelous music that placed Londontowne's strengths squarely in the spotlight.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 6, 2005
Maybe classical music is struggling to survive, but you'd never guess that looking at all the performances scheduled around here in the months ahead. The new season hasn't even shifted into high gear, and already there's an abundance of events. Take a look at this weekend. Two new chamber music ventures will be launched, both in the elegant ambience of historic mansions and, as it happens, both on the same afternoon. (The frequency of calendar overload on the local music scene gets worse every year.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | March 31, 1993
Chock full of intricate counterpoint and enough extended phrases to send even experienced singers and wind players into pulmonary arrest, the "German Requiem" of Johannes Brahms is one of the true challenges of the choral repertoire.Sunday afternoon, the combined choirs and glee clubs of the Naval Academy, Haverford and Bryn Mawr colleges and the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra met that challenge admirably in a concert at Alumni Hall.Composed while Brahms was grieving for his mother and his dear friend Robert Schumann, "Ein deutsches Requiem" is a deeply personal work.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | February 15, 1991
The circumstances at Maryland Hall Saturday evening seemed propitious for an exciting musical experience.Tickets for the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra had sold out. Beethoven's last and most expansive piano concerto, the "Emperor," shared the bill with the monumental Symphony No. 1 of Johannes Brahms.Gisele Ben-Dor, the resident conductor of the Houston Symphony and recently named music director of the ProArte Orchestra of Boston, was at the podium.Pianist Alexander Peskanov, who had wowed ASO audiences with a wild and woolly Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3 some years back, was on hand to collaborate in the "Emperor."
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