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NEWS
August 4, 1995
Hyung Kim, speaking for the Korean Society of Maryland, wants desperately for people to stay focused on the murder of Joel J. Lee in talking about a jury's decision to free the man suspected of killing the Towson State student. But that's hard to do. The charge by Korean Americans that the mostly African American jury acted out of sympathy toward the defendant, who is also black, goes far beyond what happened in that courtroom.Relations between these two pieces of the patchwork quilt that is this nation have been poor for a long time.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 2, 1998
YOU HAVE to hand it to Camille Cosby. Ask the woman for sources, and she provides sources.USA Today published a letter July 17 from Cosby, some nine days after her column appeared charging America with teaching her son Ennis Cosby's murderer, Mikhail Markasev, to hate blacks."
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 19, 1997
We find ways anew to kill Kenneth Lee.In September of 1993, Lee's oldest son, Joel Lee, was killed during a robbery in Northeast Baltimore. The elder Lee -- a Korean immigrant -- probably died a little that day, as all relatives and friends of homicide victims do.Baltimore police arrested and charged Davon Neverdon in the slaying. In July of 1995, Neverdon was tried in Baltimore Circuit Court in Joel Lee's slaying. A predominantly black jury acquitted Neverdon, who is also black, eliciting charges of racial bias from Kenneth Lee and others.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 11, 1998
Dear Camille Cosby:Please come to Baltimore. You need, desperately, to talk to a man named Kenneth Lee.According to the July 8 USA Today, you believe "America taught our son's killer to hate African-Americans." You then launched into a litany of America's "institutional" white racism sins: the images of holy people as white, the definition of black as evil, the inclusion of the movie "Birth of a Nation" in the American Film Institute's list of the top 100 American films.In what must have been a real stretch, you even criticized U.S. currency as part of the problem.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 2, 1998
YOU HAVE to hand it to Camille Cosby. Ask the woman for sources, and she provides sources.USA Today published a letter July 17 from Cosby, some nine days after her column appeared charging America with teaching her son Ennis Cosby's murderer, Mikhail Markasev, to hate blacks."
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | September 20, 1994
On the first anniversary of his son's death, Kenneth Lee remembered the pain all over again. The telephone call informing him of his son's tragic death. The tears he shed. The anguish of never seeing his elder son reach full adulthood.Standing next to his wife and younger son on a cool sunny day at Towson State University, Mr. Lee relived those memories again yesterday as he stared quietly at the tree and headstone memorializing his son. Joel J. Lee, 21, a Towson State student, was shot to death Sept.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 16, 1997
Two hundred miles from Baltimore, a Brooklyn, N.Y., jury last week convicted two men of violating the civil rights of a Hasidic Jew named Yankel Rosenbaum, who was stabbed to death during the 1991 Crown Heights race riots. In the modern vernacular, sometimes they take the word murder and substitute the term hate crime in the search for justice.Kenneth Lee heard the news out of Brooklyn, and it slashed at the wound that never heals. How is there such a verdict in New York, he wondered, and not in Baltimore, where his son, Joel Lee, 21, was murdered in front of witnesses two years ago and the courts and the prosecutors let his killer slip away?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 2, 1997
WE SAT IN the Japanese restaurant in South Baltimore last Monday -- two Korean-Americans and an African-American -- to eat and talk about justice, racism, crime and violence.One of the Koreans was Kenneth Lee, father of slain Towson State University student Joel Lee. Lee smiled and laughed lightly as the conversation sometimes turned humorous. But I noticed a sadness in Lee's eyes that will probably never vanish -- not if the American criminal justice system has anything to do with it."I need closure in this case," Lee told me earlier as we had driven to South Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
Reacting partly to concerns surrounding the investigation of a Korean-American student slain four years ago, U.S. Civil Rights Commission advisers are planning a study to determine whether Korean-Americans face racial discrimination in Baltimore.The commission's Maryland Advisory Committee, made up of volunteers who have scheduled a hearing on the issue Sept. 29, will be asking for public comments "relating to administration of justice as it applies to Korean Americans," said committee chairman Chester Wickwire.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 1, 1995
A heartbreaking sight last week was Joel Lee's family at the criminal courthouse, where they once imagined American justice would be done, sobbing when they heard the inconceivable news that no one would be punished for the murder of their son.So it goes in the city of Baltimore, many said. A black jury, everyone said (unless they had black skin). Another sign of tension between blacks and Koreans, said others, including furious leaders of Baltimore's Korean community.But the immigrant family of Joel Lee, a 21-year-old senior at Towson State University who was shot in the face in September during a robbery, didn't have to say anything at all. Their tears said everything, and they added great sadness to the general revulsion and despair felt when a jury somehow found 20-year-old Davon Neverdon not guilty of Lee's murder.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
Reacting partly to concerns surrounding the investigation of a Korean-American student slain four years ago, U.S. Civil Rights Commission advisers are planning a study to determine whether Korean-Americans face racial discrimination in Baltimore.The commission's Maryland Advisory Committee, made up of volunteers who have scheduled a hearing on the issue Sept. 29, will be asking for public comments "relating to administration of justice as it applies to Korean Americans," said committee chairman Chester Wickwire.
NEWS
March 25, 1997
Questions that will haunt Joel Lee's familyThis is in response to U.S. Attorney Lynne A. Battaglia's letter (Feb. 21). I understand the limitations of the law and the limited jurisdiction of the U.S. Justice Department. Ms. Battaglia's position is that there was insufficient evidence to show that Davon Neverdon killed my son [Joel Lee, a student at Towson State University] because of his race.I question the thoroughness of the investigation. Many of my questions about the investigation were not met, i.e. the need to protect grand jury testimony and grand jury evidence.
NEWS
February 21, 1997
No evidence that Lee slaying was racialRecent columns in The Sun have questioned the decision of federal prosecutors not to pursue civil rights charges in the killing of Joel Lee. One column even suggested that this was a catalyst for the recent wave of violence against the Korean-American community. These sensational assertions are wrong, disappointing and irresponsible.While scrutiny and criticism of government decisions are prerogatives of a free press, they should be based on a basic understanding of the requirements of the law, and an appreciation for the fact-finding and decision-making process of the Department of Justice.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 16, 1997
Two hundred miles from Baltimore, a Brooklyn, N.Y., jury last week convicted two men of violating the civil rights of a Hasidic Jew named Yankel Rosenbaum, who was stabbed to death during the 1991 Crown Heights race riots. In the modern vernacular, sometimes they take the word murder and substitute the term hate crime in the search for justice.Kenneth Lee heard the news out of Brooklyn, and it slashed at the wound that never heals. How is there such a verdict in New York, he wondered, and not in Baltimore, where his son, Joel Lee, 21, was murdered in front of witnesses two years ago and the courts and the prosecutors let his killer slip away?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 2, 1997
WE SAT IN the Japanese restaurant in South Baltimore last Monday -- two Korean-Americans and an African-American -- to eat and talk about justice, racism, crime and violence.One of the Koreans was Kenneth Lee, father of slain Towson State University student Joel Lee. Lee smiled and laughed lightly as the conversation sometimes turned humorous. But I noticed a sadness in Lee's eyes that will probably never vanish -- not if the American criminal justice system has anything to do with it."I need closure in this case," Lee told me earlier as we had driven to South Baltimore.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 30, 1997
And so the Korean community in Baltimore goes to the graveyard once more, wipes away abundant tears, and tries to remind itself why the idea of life in America once sounded so wonderful.This time they go for the slain grocer Chi Sup Kim, 44, who follows the slain merchant Yang Koo Yoon, 46, while the wounded Won Hee Ma, 58, clings to life in her Johns Hopkins Hospital bed after she was shot in the chest in a botched grocery store robbery.And at graveside, they think once more of the killer of poor Joel Lee, a killer who laughs at a justice system too trembly to pursue him.The fear in the Korean community is now palpable.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1994
A six-month investigation has turned into a manhunt for the alleged killer of Joel J. Lee, the Towson State University student shot in a Northeast Baltimore robbery that epitomized the ruthlessness of city street thugs.Davon Neverdon, 19, of the 2400 block of Bridgehampton Drive -- just two blocks from the crime scene -- is believed to have shot Mr. Lee in the face for a wallet containing $20, police said. Mr. Neverdon, charged Wednesday with first-degree murder, armed robbery and a handgun violation, was being sought last night.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Marcia Myers contributed to this article | August 23, 1995
Federal prosecutors are reviewing the Joel J. Lee case -- which created a racially charged furor when the man accused of killing the Korean-American was acquitted last month -- to see if it may merit a U.S. civil rights investigation.Prosecutors have obtained witness statements and grand jury transcripts of the Baltimore Circuit Court trial and have met with the victim's father, Kenneth Lee, as part of their preliminary review of the case, U.S. Attorney Lynne A. Battaglia said yesterday."I met with Mr. Lee for a lengthy period of time . . . to talk about his concerns.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 19, 1997
We find ways anew to kill Kenneth Lee.In September of 1993, Lee's oldest son, Joel Lee, was killed during a robbery in Northeast Baltimore. The elder Lee -- a Korean immigrant -- probably died a little that day, as all relatives and friends of homicide victims do.Baltimore police arrested and charged Davon Neverdon in the slaying. In July of 1995, Neverdon was tried in Baltimore Circuit Court in Joel Lee's slaying. A predominantly black jury acquitted Neverdon, who is also black, eliciting charges of racial bias from Kenneth Lee and others.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | September 3, 1995
Kenneth Lee told more than 300 people at a remembrance in Towson for his slain son yesterday that he lost trust in the U.S. justice system when the man charged with killing his son went free.But several state officials urged him and other Korean-Americans attending the event to keep faith in the nation's courts.People holding protest signs gathered on Towson State University's campus yesterday afternoon for a wake marking the second anniversary of the slaying of Joel Lee. The gathering was one of several conducted by Korean-American groups in the country using the anniversary as a way of pushing for improved justice for Asians in the United States.
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