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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
Just about nothing works in "The Inkwell," and that's being kind.Under the muzzy sentimentality of the young-man-coming-of-age routine, this one is really quite ugly. It maintains -- literally, without irony -- that a boy can't become a man unless he has sex with a woman, any woman. And in "The Inkwell" the sex is with a clearly emotionally disturbed older woman. It gave me the creeps.Perhaps the creepiest thing about it is that most young directors sooner or later remake a hallowed film of their youth -- usually it's "Mean Streets," though it can be "Citizen Kane" or even "The Wild Bunch" -- but Matty Rich has chosen . . . "Summer of '42"?
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 8, 1999
I don't like the television industry practice of running most or all African-American-themed programs in February in connection with Black History Month. It can create a television ghetto and cause the programs to blur together. One result is that a lot of fine programming gets ignored.Don't let the clutter keep you from seeing "The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords" tonight on PBS. Filmmaker Stanley Nelson's documentary blends biography, historical analysis, media critique, interviews and use of imagery to skillfully tell a story that needs to be heard.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 9, 1991
ODDS 'N' ENDS OFF THE BROADCAST BEAMS:* Anybody who's ever had a cat knows the word "owner" is a mere honorific. You never really own these creatures, but merely serve as a temporary landlord. Further, their aloof nature has a lot more in common with tigers in the wild than with that other domesticated pet, the dog -- at least according to tonight's 15th season premiere episode of the fine PBS series "National Geographic" (at 8, channels 22 and 67).* We saw them last spring for a few moderately well-received weeks, but they didn't make the fall docket.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
The Liberty Lions were already a bit down going into last night's match with visiting South Carroll. And the Cavaliers weren't about to let them back up.The Cavaliers got six pins on their way to a 46-14 win over a Liberty team that lost two key starters at the lighter weights.The task at hand was big enough for Liberty with South Carroll (7-1) ranked No. 9 in the metro area and on a roll. An injury to Conor Gallagher (elbow) and Brandon Wagner deciding to leave the team left Liberty coach Jeff Hash short-handed, something you can't afford against a strong South Carroll team.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
The Liberty Lions were already a bit down going into last night's match with visiting South Carroll. And the Cavaliers weren't about to let them back up.The Cavaliers got six pins on their way to a 46-14 win over a Liberty team that lost two key starters at the lighter weights.The task at hand was big enough for Liberty with South Carroll (7-1) ranked No. 9 in the metro area and on a roll. An injury to Conor Gallagher (elbow) and Brandon Wagner deciding to leave the team left Liberty coach Jeff Hash short-handed, something you can't afford against a strong South Carroll team.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 6, 1991
Our cities are a mess: Crime is rampant, there's not enough money to pay for public services (but there is enough to line the pockets of the powerful and the wealthy), tribalism is rampant, everyone hates everyone else's guts and no one -- least of all the people who make movies -- seems to give a damn.No one, that is, except John Sayles, whose "City of Hope" opens Friday at the Charles Theatre. This is a film that is likely to make people aware of poverty and the spiritual sickness of our postindustrial age in the same entertaining but honest way that the great novels of Charles Dickens did in the England of his day.Perhaps not surprisingly, Sayles is also considered one of our best fiction writers -- he earned a MacArthur "genius" grant in 1983 -- and readers who don't pay much attention to movies are sometimes surprised to discover that he's also a filmmaker.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 8, 1999
I don't like the television industry practice of running most or all African-American-themed programs in February in connection with Black History Month. It can create a television ghetto and cause the programs to blur together. One result is that a lot of fine programming gets ignored.Don't let the clutter keep you from seeing "The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords" tonight on PBS. Filmmaker Stanley Nelson's documentary blends biography, historical analysis, media critique, interviews and use of imagery to skillfully tell a story that needs to be heard.
NEWS
March 28, 2005
On Saturday, March 26, 2005, IRENESANDLER (nee Seidler); wife of Louis Sandler; daughter of the late Tillie and Wolf Seidler; sister of Edythe Seidler Freedman, Aaron Seidler and the late Joe and Morton Seidler, Pauline Seidler Friedman, Lil Seidler Galinn, Meyer and Morris Grossman; sister in-law of Pearl Seidler. Also survived by many loving and caring nieces, nephews and dear friends. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Monday, March 28 at 11 A.M. INterment Hebrew Young Men's Cemetery, Windsor Mill Road, Please omit flowers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 11, 1991
"City of Hope" is not a city of brotherly love: Blacks hate whites, who hate them back; they both hate the Hispanics, who return the favor; and the members of the working class fear and despise the poor because they fear the latter will steal what little they have.They're all enmeshed in a corrupt system that resists change and that squeezes the decency out of otherwise good people.Everyone's on the make in John Sayles' ambitious new movie about how we live now, and that means everyone's trying to take from someone else.
NEWS
December 31, 2009
There's a significant connection between two articles in The Sun on Dec. 30. "Museum will put Chile's tortured past on display" describes that nation's struggle to come to terms with the Pinochet regime's assault on both persons and the rule of law decades ago. Susan Goering's "'Gitmo North'? No thanks" points to the Obama administration's disappointingly feeble, evasive and very tardy attempts to put into practice the inaugural promise of January 2009 - the crucial promise to restore the rule of law in the U.S. As far as I can tell, the only nation thus far that has dealt decisively with a reign of torture was Greece, which promptly put on trial and convicted both the highest-level military and political leaders of the 1967-1974 junta regime and some of the most cruel torturers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
Just about nothing works in "The Inkwell," and that's being kind.Under the muzzy sentimentality of the young-man-coming-of-age routine, this one is really quite ugly. It maintains -- literally, without irony -- that a boy can't become a man unless he has sex with a woman, any woman. And in "The Inkwell" the sex is with a clearly emotionally disturbed older woman. It gave me the creeps.Perhaps the creepiest thing about it is that most young directors sooner or later remake a hallowed film of their youth -- usually it's "Mean Streets," though it can be "Citizen Kane" or even "The Wild Bunch" -- but Matty Rich has chosen . . . "Summer of '42"?
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 6, 1991
Our cities are a mess: Crime is rampant, there's not enough money to pay for public services (but there is enough to line the pockets of the powerful and the wealthy), tribalism is rampant, everyone hates everyone else's guts and no one -- least of all the people who make movies -- seems to give a damn.No one, that is, except John Sayles, whose "City of Hope" opens Friday at the Charles Theatre. This is a film that is likely to make people aware of poverty and the spiritual sickness of our postindustrial age in the same entertaining but honest way that the great novels of Charles Dickens did in the England of his day.Perhaps not surprisingly, Sayles is also considered one of our best fiction writers -- he earned a MacArthur "genius" grant in 1983 -- and readers who don't pay much attention to movies are sometimes surprised to discover that he's also a filmmaker.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 9, 1991
ODDS 'N' ENDS OFF THE BROADCAST BEAMS:* Anybody who's ever had a cat knows the word "owner" is a mere honorific. You never really own these creatures, but merely serve as a temporary landlord. Further, their aloof nature has a lot more in common with tigers in the wild than with that other domesticated pet, the dog -- at least according to tonight's 15th season premiere episode of the fine PBS series "National Geographic" (at 8, channels 22 and 67).* We saw them last spring for a few moderately well-received weeks, but they didn't make the fall docket.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
''City of Hope'' may just be John Sayles' best film to date. He's done some interesting films (''Eight Men Out,'' ''Return of -- the Secaucus Seven''), but none has been as complete and perceptive as "City of Hope."Sayles wrote, produced and directed the film, which takes place in Hudson City, where Tony Lo Bianco is a contractor with trouble on the job and at home. On the job, he is under pressure from the mayor and others who want him to surrender one of his tenements so that it can be leveled for development.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
Whether you're watching or not, it is hard to escape the trial of the century, for television keeps salting its series with links to the O.J. Simpson case.* "Between Mother and Daughter" (4 p.m.-5 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Another drama special for young people raises the issue of breast cancer from a teen-ager's point of view (like last week's ABC "Afterschool Special").In this "Schoolbreak Special," A.J. Langer ("My So Called Life") plays a 16-year-old who faces her mother's (Lindsay Crouse)
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