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Joe Mantegna

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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | August 13, 1993
Actor Joe Mantegna is the proud father of two young girls. He is determined to raise them as normal kids. He scoffs at those parents who push their kids and try to live vicariously through them.Then he went to a ballet recital.His 6-year-old was up on stage doing what 6-year-old ballerinas do and someone next to him leaned over and whispered, "She dances real well."That's all it took for Mr. Mantegna's mind to run rampant. Visions of prima ballerinas danced in his head. Suddenly, his little princess was the next Anna Pavlova.
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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | August 13, 1993
Actor Joe Mantegna is the proud father of two young girls. He is determined to raise them as normal kids. He scoffs at those parents who push their kids and try to live vicariously through them.Then he went to a ballet recital.His 6-year-old was up on stage doing what 6-year-old ballerinas do and someone next to him leaned over and whispered, "She dances real well."That's all it took for Mr. Mantegna's mind to run rampant. Visions of prima ballerinas danced in his head. Suddenly, his little princess was the next Anna Pavlova.
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By Alison Gee and Alison Gee,Entertainment News Service | January 4, 1991
Joe Mantegna doesn't pull the usual star turns expected of an actor who's headlining in two of the season's most eagerly anticipated films: Woody Allen's "Alice" and Francis Ford Coppola's "Godfather III."But then, Joe Mantegna in real life is strangely, well, ordinary, although he's been able to slip seamlessly into his past acting roles, most notably as the sleazy con men of stage and screen created for him by David Mamet, one of contemporary theater's most provocative playwrights.Sitting in a California restaurant, Mr. Mantegna seems more interested in discussing his wife Arlene's brownie business ("they come with fortunes planted in the middle of them")
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 11, 1993
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" is a movie built on a paradox: It aspires to make a rousing, upbeat, arc-of-triumph story out of the most cerebral, meditative of contests -- chess. And that's what's so interesting about it.Even as he's trying to get you to cheer as you did in "Rocky," filmmaker Steven Zaillian is aware of the absurdity of his situation: He's filming small boys as they push ritualized plastic soldiers around a little square board. If you are one of the 54 or 55 people in America who understand what QR-4 to KN-3 means, you're in pig heaven.
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By New York Times | December 28, 1990
Taylor Hackford is trading in New Visions for new visions.tTC After some two and a half years devoted to the producing side of his producer and director personality, Hackford, whose credits as producer and director include such films as "An Officer and a Gentleman," "Against All Odds," "Everybody's All American" and Bamba," is writing finis to the story of his New Visions Pictures company and returning to directing.But the company, which functioned as a small studio, leaves a legacy. There is Richard Pearce's "Long Walk Home," a story of the 1955 bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., starring Sissy Spacek as a prosperous housewife and Whoopi Goldberg as her maid.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1991
''Homicide'' is a movie in need of an ending. We may know what was intended here, but it is not stated clearly enough.''Homicide'' was shot in Baltimore. It was written and directed by David Mamet. Mamet is a product of the '60s. Early in his career, he wrote plays that didn't make much sense but won attention from some critics who went on about the hidden meaning in his plays.In time, Mamet became less abstract. You could actually make sense of what he was writing. He did the script for ''The Untouchables.
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By Jean Marbella | October 17, 1991
Everyone knows David Mamet's new movie "Homicide" is set in Baltimore, right?Well, not the New York Times, which called the film's locale a "generic American city," nor the Philadelphia Inquirer, which merely saw it as any ol' "big city," nor the Los Angeles Times, which went with "this unnamed city (which feels a lot like New York)."Despite its seeming anonymity in the movie, Baltimore welcomes "Homicide" back to town tonight with a local premiere at the Senator Theatre. A champagne reception at the theater on York Road at Belvedere Avenue at 7:30 will be followed by a screening of the movie at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 and will benefit the Theatre Project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 25, 1991
'Alice'Starring Mia Farrow and Joe Mantegna.Directed by Woody Allen.Released by Orion.Rated PG-13.*** Woody Allen had 11 great ideas for his next movie but he didn't know which one to make.So, in "Alice," he made all of them.He made the movie about being invisible.He made the movie that tweaked the comfortable pretensions of the haute urban bourgeoise.He made the movie about the ghost.He made the movie about the matron and her Chinese doctor.He made the movie about the wife and her affair with a jazz musician.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 11, 1993
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" is a movie built on a paradox: It aspires to make a rousing, upbeat, arc-of-triumph story out of the most cerebral, meditative of contests -- chess. And that's what's so interesting about it.Even as he's trying to get you to cheer as you did in "Rocky," filmmaker Steven Zaillian is aware of the absurdity of his situation: He's filming small boys as they push ritualized plastic soldiers around a little square board. If you are one of the 54 or 55 people in America who understand what QR-4 to KN-3 means, you're in pig heaven.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | July 11, 1992
The Russians are coming! The Russians are coming!As Major League Baseball prepares for its annual All-Star Game break, a new made-for-cable movie suggests that events have occurred "that may have long-term ramifications for America's favorite pastime.""The Comrades of Summer," premiering at 8 tonight on the HBO cable service, humorously fictionalizes the coming of baseball to what used to be the Soviet Union."We have great desire to achieve good results as baseballists," says a Russian envoy, who shows up at the door of fiery manager "Sparky" Smith (Joe Mantegna)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | July 11, 1992
The Russians are coming! The Russians are coming!As Major League Baseball prepares for its annual All-Star Game break, a new made-for-cable movie suggests that events have occurred "that may have long-term ramifications for America's favorite pastime.""The Comrades of Summer," premiering at 8 tonight on the HBO cable service, humorously fictionalizes the coming of baseball to what used to be the Soviet Union."We have great desire to achieve good results as baseballists," says a Russian envoy, who shows up at the door of fiery manager "Sparky" Smith (Joe Mantegna)
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By LAURA CHARLES | October 20, 1991
BALTIMORE WELCOMED David Mamet's "Homicide" back to town Thursday night at a gala premiere at the Senator Theatre. Though most of the premovie hoopla was missing, since neither the stars nor director were on hand, an enthusiastic crowd of film fans turned out for the screening -- a benefit for the Theatre Project."
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1991
''Homicide'' is a movie in need of an ending. We may know what was intended here, but it is not stated clearly enough.''Homicide'' was shot in Baltimore. It was written and directed by David Mamet. Mamet is a product of the '60s. Early in his career, he wrote plays that didn't make much sense but won attention from some critics who went on about the hidden meaning in his plays.In time, Mamet became less abstract. You could actually make sense of what he was writing. He did the script for ''The Untouchables.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | October 17, 1991
Everyone knows David Mamet's new movie "Homicide" is set in Baltimore, right?Well, not the New York Times, which called the film's locale a "generic American city," nor the Philadelphia Inquirer, which merely saw it as any ol' "big city," nor the Los Angeles Times, which went with "this unnamed city (which feels a lot like New York)."Despite its seeming anonymity in the movie, Baltimore welcomes "Homicide" back to town tonight with a local premiere at the Senator Theatre. A champagne reception at the theater on York Road at Belvedere Avenue at 7:30 will be followed by a screening of the movie at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 and will benefit the Theatre Project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 25, 1991
'Alice'Starring Mia Farrow and Joe Mantegna.Directed by Woody Allen.Released by Orion.Rated PG-13.*** Woody Allen had 11 great ideas for his next movie but he didn't know which one to make.So, in "Alice," he made all of them.He made the movie about being invisible.He made the movie that tweaked the comfortable pretensions of the haute urban bourgeoise.He made the movie about the ghost.He made the movie about the matron and her Chinese doctor.He made the movie about the wife and her affair with a jazz musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alison Gee and Alison Gee,Entertainment News Service | January 4, 1991
Joe Mantegna doesn't pull the usual star turns expected of an actor who's headlining in two of the season's most eagerly anticipated films: Woody Allen's "Alice" and Francis Ford Coppola's "Godfather III."But then, Joe Mantegna in real life is strangely, well, ordinary, although he's been able to slip seamlessly into his past acting roles, most notably as the sleazy con men of stage and screen created for him by David Mamet, one of contemporary theater's most provocative playwrights.Sitting in a California restaurant, Mr. Mantegna seems more interested in discussing his wife Arlene's brownie business ("they come with fortunes planted in the middle of them")
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | October 14, 1990
SALAD DAYS: The March of Dimes hosted its seventh annual "Gourmet Gala" last weekend at the Hyatt Regency, and naturally we were there to stir up things a tad.This year we teamed up with the Hyatt's Bruce Larsen in our cooking station, a beautifully appointed faux library with an easy chair on which we reposed while Bruce whipped up the most sinfully delicious Caesar salad. Decorated by designer Donna Foertsch, our station was patterned after "My Fair Lady" (the night's theme was Broadway musicals.
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By LAURA CHARLES | October 20, 1991
BALTIMORE WELCOMED David Mamet's "Homicide" back to town Thursday night at a gala premiere at the Senator Theatre. Though most of the premovie hoopla was missing, since neither the stars nor director were on hand, an enthusiastic crowd of film fans turned out for the screening -- a benefit for the Theatre Project."
FEATURES
By New York Times | December 28, 1990
Taylor Hackford is trading in New Visions for new visions.tTC After some two and a half years devoted to the producing side of his producer and director personality, Hackford, whose credits as producer and director include such films as "An Officer and a Gentleman," "Against All Odds," "Everybody's All American" and Bamba," is writing finis to the story of his New Visions Pictures company and returning to directing.But the company, which functioned as a small studio, leaves a legacy. There is Richard Pearce's "Long Walk Home," a story of the 1955 bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., starring Sissy Spacek as a prosperous housewife and Whoopi Goldberg as her maid.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | October 14, 1990
SALAD DAYS: The March of Dimes hosted its seventh annual "Gourmet Gala" last weekend at the Hyatt Regency, and naturally we were there to stir up things a tad.This year we teamed up with the Hyatt's Bruce Larsen in our cooking station, a beautifully appointed faux library with an easy chair on which we reposed while Bruce whipped up the most sinfully delicious Caesar salad. Decorated by designer Donna Foertsch, our station was patterned after "My Fair Lady" (the night's theme was Broadway musicals.
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