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Joe Lieberman

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By Jules Witcover | December 15, 2012
After 24 years in the U.S. Senate, Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, the first and only Jewish politician nominated to a national major party ticket, in 2000, had some advice to his colleagues in a farewell speech Wednesday on the Senate floor. To break the impasse that has paralyzed the body in recent years, Mr. Lieberman preached: "It requires reaching across the aisle and finding partners from the opposite party. That is what is desperately needed in Washington now. " In the last years of his long Senate tenure, it certainly could be said that Joe Lieberman practiced what he preached.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 15, 2012
After 24 years in the U.S. Senate, Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, the first and only Jewish politician nominated to a national major party ticket, in 2000, had some advice to his colleagues in a farewell speech Wednesday on the Senate floor. To break the impasse that has paralyzed the body in recent years, Mr. Lieberman preached: "It requires reaching across the aisle and finding partners from the opposite party. That is what is desperately needed in Washington now. " In the last years of his long Senate tenure, it certainly could be said that Joe Lieberman practiced what he preached.
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NEWS
By Tom Bisset | November 2, 2000
YOU CAN COUNT me as another evangelical Christian, once enthusiastic about Joe Lieberman's vice presidential candidacy, now disillusioned and disheartened by the politics of it all. I was there several years ago when the Democratic Connecticut senator was a guest speaker at the National Religious Broadcasters' convention in Washington. Talk about Daniel in the lion's den. An observant Orthodox Jew and the solitary representative of his faith in the room, Senator Lieberman walked calmly to the podium in a crowd of Christian radio and television executives and began to state his case.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | December 17, 2009
T o a self-described "old feminist" such as Hadassah Lieberman, the recent blog-inspired attack against her - all related to husband Joe Lieberman's obstruction of the Democrats' health care agenda - has been a surreal mix of "McCarthyism" and a "snowball fight on the playground." Actually, ambush is a better word. Blogger Jane Hamsher, a movie producer ("Natural Born Killers") and political activist, went after Mrs. Lieberman as Senator Lieberman was refusing to vote for a health care reform bill that included expanding Medicare to people as young as 55. Ms. Hamsher claimed that because Mrs. Lieberman was a lobbyist and had worked for the pharmaceutical industry, she should be fired from her position as global ambassador for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure breast cancer charity.
NEWS
By JEFFREY SCOTT SHAPIRO | August 8, 2006
Joe Lieberman is not a friend of the Bush administration. He may, however, remain the Democratic Party's last hope of recapturing the White House. The senator from Connecticut is one of the last hawkish Democrats in a political party that has fallen under the spell of anti-war "cut-and-run" liberals who want America to withdraw from Iraq. As a result, he is falsely accused of being a blind supporter of the administration. But that shouldn't surprise many Democrats who support the war. Ever since the liberation of Iraq, the party's leadership has taken a virulent anti-war position and isolated its members who support the war, even when they remain loyal to core Democratic values.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - Sen. Joe Lieberman's office brims with campaign souvenirs - a photograph of the former vice presidential candidate hamming it up on Conan O'Brien's late-night TV show (where he sang Frank Sinatra's "My Way"), a snapshot of him basking in the cheers of union workers, a week of "Doonesbury" cartoons celebrating his candidacy. But good stuff for the glory wall is only the start of what this Democrat from Connecticut hopes to take from last year's unsuccessful Gore-Lieberman campaign.
NEWS
By Tony Snow | August 21, 2000
LOS ANGELES - At the height of the Democratic convention, at a moment when members of the audience were trying hard to work themselves into delirium, while the band was blaring and the signs were waving and the delegates were swaying, a very odd thing happened. Not 50 feet from the podium where Al Gore and Joe Lieberman stood to address the throng, a Democratic official who shall remain nameless walked up and asked, "So who do you think is going to win in November?" Thinking that perhaps this was a subtle boast, I gave the same answer I have been giving for weeks, "Ask me in October."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | August 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Does anybody around here remember Bill Clinton? If you had dropped in from Mars at Vice President Al Gore's introduction of Sen. Joe Lieberman as his running mate, and heard both of them talk about the state of the nation after eight years of the Clinton presidency, you certainly wouldn't have recalled him. It was not simply the artful total avoidance of the president's name in either speech. The heavy emphasis on the peace and prosperity produced on his White House watch made it sound as if the architect was Mr. Gore, or at least a mystery man who wasn't there.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | August 15, 2000
WASHINGTON - We should not make too much of Joseph Lieberman's religion, although it is a wonderful thing to celebrate. It is wonderful to celebrate the historical significance of Al Gore's naming of the Connecticut senator to be the first Jew on a major party ticket. It is wonderful to be alive and American at a time when that can happen, a time when we could soon witness our first Jewish vice president. It shows that doors of opportunity continue to open up for ethnic minorities, which is a lot better than seeing the doors move the other way. But it is not helpful for us to wonder very much, as some commentators have, about whether Mr. Lieberman's faith will threaten national security or otherwise impair his ability to conduct his job on the Sabbath, which begins for Jews at sundown on Fridays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Eichel and By Larry Eichel,Special to the Sun | May 13, 2001
"Divided We Stand: How Al Gore Beat George Bush and Lost the Presidency," by Roger Simon. Crown, 321 pages, $25. Roger Simon's look back at last year's presidential election doesn't qualify as deep political analysis. Nor does it search for profound truth. Rather, it's a quirky, episodic set of tales from the front, spiced with barbed and sarcastic asides. The most useful way of looking at modern campaigning, writes Simon, is as an attempt to make emotional connections with strangers.
NEWS
By JohnFritze and JohnFritze,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2006
Democratic Rep. Albert R. Wynn, running in one of Maryland's most competitive congressional races against a candidate he once hired as a summer clerk, took an early lead in last night's primary, but the race was too close to call. Wynn, first elected to the 4th District in suburban Washington in 1992, faced Donna Edwards, a former foundation executive whom Wynn hired when she was in law school two decades ago and who ran a spirited campaign that called the incumbent's voting record and ethics into question.
NEWS
By JEFFREY SCOTT SHAPIRO | August 8, 2006
Joe Lieberman is not a friend of the Bush administration. He may, however, remain the Democratic Party's last hope of recapturing the White House. The senator from Connecticut is one of the last hawkish Democrats in a political party that has fallen under the spell of anti-war "cut-and-run" liberals who want America to withdraw from Iraq. As a result, he is falsely accused of being a blind supporter of the administration. But that shouldn't surprise many Democrats who support the war. Ever since the liberation of Iraq, the party's leadership has taken a virulent anti-war position and isolated its members who support the war, even when they remain loyal to core Democratic values.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - And now there are nine. With the announcement that Sen. Bob Graham of Florida will seek the Democratic presidential nomination, that's the number of hats in the ring for the pleasure of taking on President Bush next year. Ordinarily, with a White House incumbent riding at 61 percent job approval in the most recent Gallup Poll, members of the opposition party could be expected to take cover and wait for the end of his second term to make their moves. But George W. Bush's first two years in office have convinced this bumper crop of Democratic hopefuls of two things.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Eichel and By Larry Eichel,Special to the Sun | May 13, 2001
"Divided We Stand: How Al Gore Beat George Bush and Lost the Presidency," by Roger Simon. Crown, 321 pages, $25. Roger Simon's look back at last year's presidential election doesn't qualify as deep political analysis. Nor does it search for profound truth. Rather, it's a quirky, episodic set of tales from the front, spiced with barbed and sarcastic asides. The most useful way of looking at modern campaigning, writes Simon, is as an attempt to make emotional connections with strangers.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - Sen. Joe Lieberman's office brims with campaign souvenirs - a photograph of the former vice presidential candidate hamming it up on Conan O'Brien's late-night TV show (where he sang Frank Sinatra's "My Way"), a snapshot of him basking in the cheers of union workers, a week of "Doonesbury" cartoons celebrating his candidacy. But good stuff for the glory wall is only the start of what this Democrat from Connecticut hopes to take from last year's unsuccessful Gore-Lieberman campaign.
NEWS
By Tom Bisset | November 2, 2000
YOU CAN COUNT me as another evangelical Christian, once enthusiastic about Joe Lieberman's vice presidential candidacy, now disillusioned and disheartened by the politics of it all. I was there several years ago when the Democratic Connecticut senator was a guest speaker at the National Religious Broadcasters' convention in Washington. Talk about Daniel in the lion's den. An observant Orthodox Jew and the solitary representative of his faith in the room, Senator Lieberman walked calmly to the podium in a crowd of Christian radio and television executives and began to state his case.
NEWS
By JohnFritze and JohnFritze,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2006
Democratic Rep. Albert R. Wynn, running in one of Maryland's most competitive congressional races against a candidate he once hired as a summer clerk, took an early lead in last night's primary, but the race was too close to call. Wynn, first elected to the 4th District in suburban Washington in 1992, faced Donna Edwards, a former foundation executive whom Wynn hired when she was in law school two decades ago and who ran a spirited campaign that called the incumbent's voting record and ethics into question.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - And now there are nine. With the announcement that Sen. Bob Graham of Florida will seek the Democratic presidential nomination, that's the number of hats in the ring for the pleasure of taking on President Bush next year. Ordinarily, with a White House incumbent riding at 61 percent job approval in the most recent Gallup Poll, members of the opposition party could be expected to take cover and wait for the end of his second term to make their moves. But George W. Bush's first two years in office have convinced this bumper crop of Democratic hopefuls of two things.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 27, 2000
MILFORD, Conn. - Republican Phil Giordano's campaign for a U.S. Senate seat from Connecticut is symbolized by its most effective prop - a life-size cardboard cutout of his Democratic opponent, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman. "A lot of people are posing with it, taking pictures," said Giordano as he shook hands with commuters on a railroad platform one morning this week. For Giordano, the mayor of Waterbury, it's no joke. He's running against a popular but elusive incumbent who spends most days traipsing the country as Al Gore's running mate even as he's also seeking re-election to the Senate.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 19, 2000
BOSTON -- Bostonians do take history seriously. We have landmarks on every memorable site from Paul Revere's house to Lexington and Concord. But somehow I don't think we'll be putting up a plaque to Al and Tipper's romance. The candidate buzzed into town Wednesday proclaiming deep affection for the home of the bean and the cod and the college student. "I love this city," he told a crowd. "I proposed to my wife Tipper in this city." Ever since The Kiss that launched a thousand analysts we've been told that one smackeroo made all the difference.
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