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By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 26, 2000
GREENVILLE, S.C. - Lester Erwin leads the way into a sanctuary that holds what is, in his world, Excalibur and the ghost of King Arthur. Amid collectibles on a table, cradled between two wooden holders, there it is. Dark as baker's chocolate, slightly bowed in the shaft, with loosened black tape at the handle, the hickory bat looks as exotic as the tiny baseball gloves players wore 80 years ago. "This is Black Betsy," he says proudly, as if introducing one...
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 13, 2014
There wasn't much in Sunday night's "60 Minutes" report on baseball's Alex Rodriguez investigation that could truly shock anyone at this point in the sport's tawdry PED era. Everyone knows that anabolic steroids and other sophisticated performance-enhancing substances have been rampant in baseball for decades. The thing that was most revealing about the interview with Biogenesis snake oil salesman Anthony Bosch and the documentary evidence presented was the lengths that athletes will go to gain some advantage over the competition and the lengths that Major League Baseball was willing to go -- in this case -- to build a case against one of the most celebrated of the alleged steroid offenders.
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NEWS
By Sally Connell and Michael Muskal and Sally Connell and Michael Muskal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Jurors in the Michael Jackson molestation case ended their first full day of deliberations without reaching a verdict, but the bulk of action was outside the courtroom yesterday. The crowd of fans increased steadily and the tension among the estimated 1,200 members of the media grew throughout the day. Amid the hoopla, Joe Jackson, the singer's father, set off a minor fracas during an unscheduled appearance at the courthouse, and the Rev. Jesse Jackson condemned authorities for prosecuting the pop star.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
Antonio Barton had only a handful of Division I basketball programs interested in him three years ago coming out Notre Dame Prep in Massachusetts, where he spent a post-grad year after playing his senior season at Lake Clifton. When Barton announced his intentions to leave Memphis last month and finish his college career elsewhere, the 6-2 point guard from Baltimore said that some two dozen schools contacted him about transferring. Barton, who reportedly has narrowed his list down to four schools, said last week that he expects to make his decision Sunday.
SPORTS
June 29, 1991
The Chicago Cubs fired pitching coach Dick Pole yesterday after their 12th loss in 13 games, a 14-6 rout by the St. Louis Cardinals in which Cubs pitchers allowed 21 hits.He was replaced by Billy Connors, who was Chicago's pitching coach from 1982-86. Pole, 40, was in his fourth season with the Cubs, and his departure comes a little more than five weeks after manager Don Zimmer was fired."Sometimes, a fresh look helps," manager Jim Essian said.* EXPANSION: Major-league owners will meet by conference call Friday to vote on final approval of Denver and Miami as the National League's expansion cities.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | July 17, 1995
It's more than a sentimental journey, the vacation trip Mark Babiarz has planned with his 11-year-old daughter later this summer. It's part of a continuing campaign Mark has always felt pretty strong about before increased involvement turned it into a crusade for him.A letter Babiarz dispatched to several newspapers, marking the occasion of the 106th anniversary of "Shoeless" Joe Jackson's birth (yesterday) helps to explain:"It has been 75 long years since Joe Jackson was banned from the game of baseball . . . imagine how he felt after juries acquitted him twice of all charges of conspiring to throw the 1919 World Series only to be banned from baseball for life.
SPORTS
By Dave Kindred and Dave Kindred,The Sporting News | November 11, 1994
So one night the president of the United States goes to the Lincoln bedroom in the White House.He wants to show his guest something. They walk to a room next door and stop in front of two dressers with large mirrors and stacks of drawers.There the president pulls open a drawer to reveal a cache the contents of which are so unexpected that his guest, even years later, would say of that moment, "Geez, I was just startled."What Ted Williams saw, that night by Lincoln's bedroom in the White House, were hundreds of a fishermen's flies: "Salmon flies and English flies.
NEWS
By Harriet Ryan and Harriet Ryan,Tribune Newspapers | June 29, 2009
LOS ANGELES - -A lawyer for Michael Jackson's personal physician said Sunday that reports that the doctor injected the pop star with a powerful painkiller before his death were "absolutely false." "There was no Demerol. No OxyContin," said Edward Chernoff, the attorney for Dr. Conrad Murray. The lawyer, who was present Saturday for Murray's three-hour interview with Los Angeles Police Department detectives, said Jackson was already unconscious when the doctor "fortuitously" entered the bedroom of the performer's Holmby Hills mansion.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio | September 13, 1990
The fall concert season is shaping up to be quite dry not just in this area but throughout the country. Many bands had a difficult time selling tickets in the summer, therefore managers are leery about sending their other acts into the drought.Only two major arena shows have been announced -- one a holdover from the summer -- and many local clubs are also suffering empty dates because record companies are pulling tour money from bands.* Billy Idol and Faith No More perform on Sunday at the Capital Centre in Landover.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
You've seen this man before. This fellow in the black-and-white photograph the size of a baseball card. But this is not how you saw him. You saw him betraying a nation's faith, maybe walking out of a courtroom with a sad little kid hanging from his coat sleeve pleading with him to deny the awful corruption. Or maybe you saw him as a ghost in an antique baseball uniform stepping out of an Iowa corn field.This fellow in the snapshot is from another place, a pleasant balding man with big features who seems to have not a trouble in the world.
NEWS
By Harriet Ryan and Harriet Ryan,Tribune Newspapers | June 29, 2009
LOS ANGELES - -A lawyer for Michael Jackson's personal physician said Sunday that reports that the doctor injected the pop star with a powerful painkiller before his death were "absolutely false." "There was no Demerol. No OxyContin," said Edward Chernoff, the attorney for Dr. Conrad Murray. The lawyer, who was present Saturday for Murray's three-hour interview with Los Angeles Police Department detectives, said Jackson was already unconscious when the doctor "fortuitously" entered the bedroom of the performer's Holmby Hills mansion.
NEWS
By Sally Connell and Michael Muskal and Sally Connell and Michael Muskal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Jurors in the Michael Jackson molestation case ended their first full day of deliberations without reaching a verdict, but the bulk of action was outside the courtroom yesterday. The crowd of fans increased steadily and the tension among the estimated 1,200 members of the media grew throughout the day. Amid the hoopla, Joe Jackson, the singer's father, set off a minor fracas during an unscheduled appearance at the courthouse, and the Rev. Jesse Jackson condemned authorities for prosecuting the pop star.
NEWS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 26, 2000
GREENVILLE, S.C. - Lester Erwin leads the way into a sanctuary that holds what is, in his world, Excalibur and the ghost of King Arthur. Amid collectibles on a table, cradled between two wooden holders, there it is. Dark as baker's chocolate, slightly bowed in the shaft, with loosened black tape at the handle, the hickory bat looks as exotic as the tiny baseball gloves players wore 80 years ago. "This is Black Betsy," he says proudly, as if introducing one...
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
You've seen this man before. This fellow in the black-and-white photograph the size of a baseball card. But this is not how you saw him. You saw him betraying a nation's faith, maybe walking out of a courtroom with a sad little kid hanging from his coat sleeve pleading with him to deny the awful corruption. Or maybe you saw him as a ghost in an antique baseball uniform stepping out of an Iowa corn field.This fellow in the snapshot is from another place, a pleasant balding man with big features who seems to have not a trouble in the world.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | July 17, 1995
It's more than a sentimental journey, the vacation trip Mark Babiarz has planned with his 11-year-old daughter later this summer. It's part of a continuing campaign Mark has always felt pretty strong about before increased involvement turned it into a crusade for him.A letter Babiarz dispatched to several newspapers, marking the occasion of the 106th anniversary of "Shoeless" Joe Jackson's birth (yesterday) helps to explain:"It has been 75 long years since Joe Jackson was banned from the game of baseball . . . imagine how he felt after juries acquitted him twice of all charges of conspiring to throw the 1919 World Series only to be banned from baseball for life.
SPORTS
By Dave Kindred and Dave Kindred,The Sporting News | November 11, 1994
So one night the president of the United States goes to the Lincoln bedroom in the White House.He wants to show his guest something. They walk to a room next door and stop in front of two dressers with large mirrors and stacks of drawers.There the president pulls open a drawer to reveal a cache the contents of which are so unexpected that his guest, even years later, would say of that moment, "Geez, I was just startled."What Ted Williams saw, that night by Lincoln's bedroom in the White House, were hundreds of a fishermen's flies: "Salmon flies and English flies.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1990
While other bands that yearn to be successful are doing anything and everything their record companies tell them, The Beat Farmers seem to go more and more in the opposite direction.The quartet of crazies from San Diego is the antithesis of all that is normal about rock bands.Their ages, ranging from 28 to 40, seem more suited to a play-around-town kind of band, but instead, they spends six months a year touring the country.When it was time to release its fifth album earlier this year, The Beat Farmers committed what some consider the ultimate recording sin -- they released a live album called "Loud and Plowed and . . . LIVE!"
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
Michael does Oprah; Joe does Baltimore."Michael's interview with Oprah was good for Michael. It sort of put me down a little bit. When you chastised a youngster back in the early ages, we called it a whipping. Now it's called child abuse," said Joe Jackson, father of Michael, LaToya and all those other singing and confessing Jacksons.But that was all he would say on the subject; the press conference he held in Baltimore yesterday was called to promote his new soft drink, "jocola," rather than to discuss his children's allegations that he abused them.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
Michael does Oprah; Joe does Baltimore."Michael's interview with Oprah was good for Michael. It sort of put me down a little bit. When you chastised a youngster back in the early ages, we called it a whipping. Now it's called child abuse," said Joe Jackson, father of Michael, LaToya and all those other singing and confessing Jacksons.But that was all he would say on the subject; the press conference he held in Baltimore yesterday was called to promote his new soft drink, "jocola," rather than to discuss his children's allegations that he abused them.
NEWS
By Stan Burns | December 1, 1992
I SAT at the dinner table and listened to my father tell my son about Shoeless Joe Jackson, about how when my father was growing up, he used to deliver newspapers to Jackson in Greenville, S.C.My 11-year-old son is an avid baseball fan who wanted to hear every detail: Why was Joe Jackson banished from baseball for life? (For my son there could be no punishment worse than being banished forever from playing baseball.) Why did they say he "threw" that game, what does it mean to throw a game, why didn't the people believe him, what did he look like, did you know him?
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