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Joe Garagiola

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SPORTS
November 1, 2001
He said it "I'm not happy with it. I obviously prefer to be playing. I'm sure Joe knows that." , Chuck Knoblauch, on being benched by Yankees manager Joe Torre He said it "He's watching our bus go by, and all of a sudden he puts his thumb down. That's why this is the greatest place in the world." Joe Garagiola Jr., Diamondbacks GM, talking about a New York priest.
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SPORTS
November 1, 2001
He said it "I'm not happy with it. I obviously prefer to be playing. I'm sure Joe knows that." , Chuck Knoblauch, on being benched by Yankees manager Joe Torre He said it "He's watching our bus go by, and all of a sudden he puts his thumb down. That's why this is the greatest place in the world." Joe Garagiola Jr., Diamondbacks GM, talking about a New York priest.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 21, 1992
Tired of the weekly commute from New York to his Phoenix home, Joe Garagiola is stepping down as co-anchor of NBC's "Today" show.The avuncular former major-leaguer, brought back to "Today" 20 months ago to try to stop the show's ratings hemorrhage, has a new assignment as of Monday: correspondent-at-large. He'll specialize in sports and human-interest stories."The travel got stale," Mr. Garagiola said yesterday of his "Today" stint.Mr. Garagiola says he requested the change from NBC News DTC boss Michael Gartner about six weeks ago. As a show of faith, Mr. Gartner extended his contract -- due to expire June 1 -- for two years.
SPORTS
May 19, 1994
Joe Garagiola has spent his life in baseball as a player, announcer and sports commenta- tor for NBC's "Today." Recently, he has spearheaded the efforts of the Baseball Assistance Team, a nonprofit group that offers financial support to ex-players and other baseball officials. Garagiola talked about the cause with The Sun's Mark Hyman.Q: Who does BAT help?A: Players, of course. But not only players. We recently changed our bylaws to take care of umpires, front-office personnel, scouts, widows, Negro League players.
SPORTS
May 19, 1994
Joe Garagiola has spent his life in baseball as a player, announcer and sports commenta- tor for NBC's "Today." Recently, he has spearheaded the efforts of the Baseball Assistance Team, a nonprofit group that offers financial support to ex-players and other baseball officials. Garagiola talked about the cause with The Sun's Mark Hyman.Q: Who does BAT help?A: Players, of course. But not only players. We recently changed our bylaws to take care of umpires, front-office personnel, scouts, widows, Negro League players.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 19, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* A two-part radio documentary about breast cancer, concluding on tonight's edition of "Soundprint" (at 6:30, WJHU-FM 88.1), is also being made available by mail on cassettes. "Soundprint" is produced at WJHU and airs nationally on stations of the American Public Radio network.The programs include: "Breast Cancer: A Primer," which aired last week, and "Reaching for Power Through the Pain," which can be heard tonight.The first show explores the newest medical research and treatment options, while the second includes profiles of women who have dealt with the disease, including poet Audre Lorde, who wrote "The Cancer Journals," the first book about breast cancer by a black woman.
SPORTS
August 4, 1991
A major fan of the KeysHow much I enjoyed reading the articles on the Frederick Keys.I, too, find myself driving to their games, several times a summer. From my house in Irvington, I can drive, park and walk to Grove Stadium in just slightly over the same amount of time it takes me to drive and negotiate the traffic to Memorial Stadium and park and walk from my car. Tickets are cheaper for the Keys, seats are better and the atmosphere is delightful.While watching a Keys game (or a Suns game; I try to get there at least once a season)
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko | March 11, 1997
What the Orioles did yesterday: Improved their record to 8-0-1 in their last nine games with an 8-5 win over the Atlanta Braves at Fort Lauderdale Stadium. Rafael Palmeiro knocked in four runs and Mike Bordick went 2-for-2 with two runs scored.What the Orioles will do today: Play the Philadelphia Phillies for the only time this spring, in the first of two night games at Fort Lauderdale Stadium (7: 05 p.m.). Right-hander Mike Mussina (1-0, 1.80 ERA) will start for the Orioles, followed by Rule 5 draftee Mike Johnson, Terry Mathews and Randy Myers.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | April 7, 1992
Oriole Park at Camden Yards looked as good on the small screen yesterday as it does in real life.In fact, the ballpark and Baltimore came across like a Chamber of Commerce dream in a day of pictures beamed coast to coast. They were flat-out showcased on ABC's "Good Morning America" with Charles Gibson and Spencer Christian and NBC's "Today" show with Willard Scott and Joe Garagiola broadcasting from Baltimore.The anchormen and weathermen -- in Orioles team jackets and hats -- gushed about the ballpark.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Orioles third baseman Manny Machado had his suspension appeal hearing Wednesday at the team's offices in the Warehouse, and he said he thought it went well. Now he'll wait to hear whether his five-game suspension for throwing a bat during the Orioles-Oakland Athletics game June 8 will be reduced. “We'll just wait, wait and see. See where it takes us,” Machado said. “At this point, there's nothing to talk about.” Machado said the hearing, which lasted about an hour, was held before Joe Garagiola Jr., baseball's senior vice president of standards and on-field operations.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 21, 1992
Tired of the weekly commute from New York to his Phoenix home, Joe Garagiola is stepping down as co-anchor of NBC's "Today" show.The avuncular former major-leaguer, brought back to "Today" 20 months ago to try to stop the show's ratings hemorrhage, has a new assignment as of Monday: correspondent-at-large. He'll specialize in sports and human-interest stories."The travel got stale," Mr. Garagiola said yesterday of his "Today" stint.Mr. Garagiola says he requested the change from NBC News DTC boss Michael Gartner about six weeks ago. As a show of faith, Mr. Gartner extended his contract -- due to expire June 1 -- for two years.
SPORTS
August 4, 1991
A major fan of the KeysHow much I enjoyed reading the articles on the Frederick Keys.I, too, find myself driving to their games, several times a summer. From my house in Irvington, I can drive, park and walk to Grove Stadium in just slightly over the same amount of time it takes me to drive and negotiate the traffic to Memorial Stadium and park and walk from my car. Tickets are cheaper for the Keys, seats are better and the atmosphere is delightful.While watching a Keys game (or a Suns game; I try to get there at least once a season)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 19, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* A two-part radio documentary about breast cancer, concluding on tonight's edition of "Soundprint" (at 6:30, WJHU-FM 88.1), is also being made available by mail on cassettes. "Soundprint" is produced at WJHU and airs nationally on stations of the American Public Radio network.The programs include: "Breast Cancer: A Primer," which aired last week, and "Reaching for Power Through the Pain," which can be heard tonight.The first show explores the newest medical research and treatment options, while the second includes profiles of women who have dealt with the disease, including poet Audre Lorde, who wrote "The Cancer Journals," the first book about breast cancer by a black woman.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
Not too many public address announcers have been honored with museum exhibits commemorating their careers. Then again, not too many were as revered as Rex Barney, the genial, longtime stadium voice of the Orioles, who died in August.Tomorrow, on what would have been Barney's 73rd birthday, the Babe Ruth Museum unveils its new tribute to the announcer: an exhibit that displays his microphone, binoculars and scorebook at a desk facing a huge, panoramic photo of Camden Yards, the same dazzling view Barney once enjoyed from his seat in the press box.A photo montage and five-minute videotape display highlights from his 27 years as stadium announcer, years when he entertained Orioles fans with his trademark sayings of: "Thank yewwww!"
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