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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
"A popular saying at the turn of century was that Baltimore was known to the world as the birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner, the jurisdiction of Cardinal Gibbons and the home of Joe Gans," said The Sun in 1960.Joe Gans, the small (5 feet 6 inches) and light (133 pounds) welterweight and former oyster shucker, had risen from the obscurity of the Baltimore slums to become the world's lightweight boxing champion in 1902 when he beat Frank Erne.He was champ of the 135-pound class for six years, winning 147 fights and losing only eight, his last in 1908 to Battling Nelson.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2013
Oct. 28, 2006: Delaware's Joe Flacco passes for four touchdowns, but Towson's Sean Schaefer throws for five as the visiting Tigers (6-2) upend the Blue Hens, 49-35. Nov. 2, 1982: Oakland Mills' girls soccer team ends rival Wilde Lake's 58-game winning streak, 3-1. Theresa O'Donnell scores twice in the hard-fought contest in which six players are injured. Oct. 28, 1978: John Manns, 16, a junior at Mergenthaler, becomes the first Maryland high school football player to die from injuries received during a game.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
The late, great Joe Gans -- Baltimore's first world boxing champion -- would turn over in his grave if he could see what's happened to the neighborhood.Mount Auburn Cemetery, Maryland's first black cemetery founded in 1872, where the turn-of-century lightweight is buried, is a wild mess and has been for a long time.Sprawling over 33 hilly acres in Westport, it is a field of leaning monuments, tilted and turned-over tombstones. Weeds engulf grieving angels and obelisks; old graves are sinking away.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
June 30, 1999: Three Maryland players go early in the NBA draft. The Vancouver Grizzlies select Steve Francis, the Terps ' star guard, with the second overall pick, and center Obinna Ekezie in the second round. Francis becomes a three-time All-Star over nine years; Ekezie will be a journeyman substitute for four seasons. Forward Laron Profit goes to the Orlando Magic in Round 2 and plays sparingly in four years. July 3, 1985: "Wild" Bill Hagy, the Orioles' No. 1 fan, is arrested by police after throwing a Thermos onto the Memorial Stadium field from his seat in Section 34 during the Birds' 4-3 loss to the Detroit Tigers.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
June 30, 1999: Three Maryland players go early in the NBA draft. The Vancouver Grizzlies select Steve Francis, the Terps ' star guard, with the second overall pick, and center Obinna Ekezie in the second round. Francis becomes a three-time All-Star over nine years; Ekezie will be a journeyman substitute for four seasons. Forward Laron Profit goes to the Orlando Magic in Round 2 and plays sparingly in four years. July 3, 1985: "Wild" Bill Hagy, the Orioles' No. 1 fan, is arrested by police after throwing a Thermos onto the Memorial Stadium field from his seat in Section 34 during the Birds' 4-3 loss to the Detroit Tigers.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
March 28, 2009: In the longest lacrosse game in NCAA history - seven overtimes - top-ranked Virginia defeats No. 9 Maryland, 10-9. Brian Carr oll (Gilman) scores the winning goal for the host Cavaliers. The game lasts 3 hours, 45 minutes. March 30, 2002: "I believe in myself," guard Juan Dixon says after leading Maryland to a 97-88 basketball victory over Kansas in the NCAA semifinals in Atlanta. Dixon, from Calvert Hall, scores 33 as the Terps (31-4) advance to the championship game against Indiana.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 12, 2012
It was one of the true watershed moments in Baltimore sports history, so why should anyone be surprised that Frank Deford - one of the greatest sportswriters of the modern era and a Charm City native - would be there to witness it? Well, slightly after the fact. The date was July 4, 1944 and the place was Greenmount Avenue and 29th Street, where a 5-year-old Deford stood with his mother and looked at the smoking pile of debris that remained of Oriole Park. The old wooden stadium was destroyed the night before by a fire that some now credit with helping turn Baltimore into a major league city.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
At a time when a fellow Baltimorean named George Ruth was barely in knickers, Joe Gans was the biggest star in town. Along with Cardinal James Gibbons — the Cardinal Gibbons — Gans was one of the most famous people in the country. Maybe even the world. Boxing fans knew Gans, who died a century ago Tuesday, as the world's first African-American champion, but he was more than that. Those in Baltimore knew Gans as the proprietor of the city's hottest nightclub who tooled around the cobblestone streets in Henry Ford's newfangled automobile.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
Following Rye and Bond Street Social, another new bar is coming to Fells Point. To be called Frederick's on Fleet Street, the bar replaces Tyson's Tavern, which closed last year. The general manager and part-owner is Jim Saufley, a longtime bartender and part-time boxing coach.  The anticipated opening date is April 1. Like Rye, Frederick's will focus on craft cocktails - originals by Saufley and his own take on vintage cocktails. Saufley has been a corporate bartender, for Marriott hotels, for 18 years and is a member of the new Baltimore Bartenders' Guild . He and his business partner, Eric Butterfield, have been renovating the small bar - it holds about 100 people - since last October, when they bought the business.
NEWS
April 24, 2001
THE BRUTAL sport of boxing has a new ambassador -- one who doesn't think his opponents' ears or their children are delicacies. The new World Boxing Council and International Boxing Federation champ, Baltimore's Hasim Rahman, is a refreshing change from Mike Tyson, whose personality and peculiarities have dominated the sport too long. The new champ learned better lessons. When Mr. Rahman floored Lennox Lewis and the rest of the boxing world in winning the heavyweight title, he changed the face of professional boxing for the better.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 12, 2012
It was one of the true watershed moments in Baltimore sports history, so why should anyone be surprised that Frank Deford - one of the greatest sportswriters of the modern era and a Charm City native - would be there to witness it? Well, slightly after the fact. The date was July 4, 1944 and the place was Greenmount Avenue and 29th Street, where a 5-year-old Deford stood with his mother and looked at the smoking pile of debris that remained of Oriole Park. The old wooden stadium was destroyed the night before by a fire that some now credit with helping turn Baltimore into a major league city.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
At a time when a fellow Baltimorean named George Ruth was barely in knickers, Joe Gans was the biggest star in town. Along with Cardinal James Gibbons — the Cardinal Gibbons — Gans was one of the most famous people in the country. Maybe even the world. Boxing fans knew Gans, who died a century ago Tuesday, as the world's first African-American champion, but he was more than that. Those in Baltimore knew Gans as the proprietor of the city's hottest nightclub who tooled around the cobblestone streets in Henry Ford's newfangled automobile.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
"A popular saying at the turn of century was that Baltimore was known to the world as the birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner, the jurisdiction of Cardinal Gibbons and the home of Joe Gans," said The Sun in 1960.Joe Gans, the small (5 feet 6 inches) and light (133 pounds) welterweight and former oyster shucker, had risen from the obscurity of the Baltimore slums to become the world's lightweight boxing champion in 1902 when he beat Frank Erne.He was champ of the 135-pound class for six years, winning 147 fights and losing only eight, his last in 1908 to Battling Nelson.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
The late, great Joe Gans -- Baltimore's first world boxing champion -- would turn over in his grave if he could see what's happened to the neighborhood.Mount Auburn Cemetery, Maryland's first black cemetery founded in 1872, where the turn-of-century lightweight is buried, is a wild mess and has been for a long time.Sprawling over 33 hilly acres in Westport, it is a field of leaning monuments, tilted and turned-over tombstones. Weeds engulf grieving angels and obelisks; old graves are sinking away.
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