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By Gregory Kane | December 22, 2001
SITTING IN one of the Muvico complex's 24 theaters late Thursday, I waited for the story of my life to begin. Director Michael Mann's Ali, a biopic of three-time heavyweight champ Muhammad Ali, opens Christmas Day. A preview was held at Muvico, the theaters with the Egyptian theme, in Arundel Mills Mall (also known as Mall Gargantua). I sat in a row reserved for the media and pondered just how Will Smith, a good but not great actor, would pull off duplicating Ali's charisma. (He gave a better-than-expected performance)
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | November 9, 2011
Growing up in Philadelphia as an aspiring amateur boxer, Ravens linebacker Jameel McClain found a mentor in the city's boxing champion, “ Smokin” Joe Frazier . McClain, who was 6-1 as a boxer while competing in area Golden Gloves tournaments, was given his first pair of boxing trunks by Frazier. That's why Monday's news that Frazier had died at age 67 after a short bout with liver cancer hit McClain hard. “It's bad news for the world, but [especially] for Philly,” McClain said.
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TOPIC
By Kram was interviewed by Perspective Editor Mike Adams | June 24, 2001
IN THE 1970s, Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier met in three epic ring battles that were unsurpassed for their savagery. Ali, the matador, and Frazier, the bull who refused to be fooled by Ali's cape. Their first fight in 1971 was a morality play performed before a nation split by racial strife and the Vietnam War. In 1967, Ali, a Black Muslim, was stripped of his title and banned from the ring for refusing to serve in the military. His return in 1970 set the stage for a showdown with Frazier, the heavyweight champ.
SPORTS
November 9, 2011
Among top heavyweights Barry Stavro Los Angeles Times Joe Frazier's greatness and immortality can be measured easily because you can't say Ali without saying Frazier, any more than you could say Dempsey without Tunney or Robinson without La Motta. Frazier gave Ali the two worst beatings "The Greatest" suffered in his prime. In their first epic bout in 1971, Frazier, with one of the great left hooks in history, dumped Ali on the canvas in the 15th round to give Ali his first loss.
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | February 18, 1991
Former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier is writing a book. It's his autobiography and he promises it will be best-seller material.The title: "Joe Frazier, the Champ Nobody Knows.""This will be about the ordinary Joe -- who ain't so ordinary," says Frazier, with his familiar grin.The former champ gets serious when he tells you more than a few chapters will be on the man he still calls Cassius Clay."It's stuff you never read in any newspapers," says Frazier, who engaged Muhammad Ali in three of the most memorable fights ever.
SPORTS
November 9, 2011
Among top heavyweights Barry Stavro Los Angeles Times Joe Frazier's greatness and immortality can be measured easily because you can't say Ali without saying Frazier, any more than you could say Dempsey without Tunney or Robinson without La Motta. Frazier gave Ali the two worst beatings "The Greatest" suffered in his prime. In their first epic bout in 1971, Frazier, with one of the great left hooks in history, dumped Ali on the canvas in the 15th round to give Ali his first loss.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue has made it clear in the past that he believes only players and coaches should be allowed in the football Hall of Fame, but he conceded yesterday that there should be a place in Canton for Ravens owner Art Modell. "Art Modell is now beginning his fifth decade as an owner," Tagliabue said. "He did a tremendous job with the Browns. Only because of some very extraordinary and dramatic plays was he denied the chance to participate in the Super Bowl as the owner of the Browns.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 4, 1996
Butch McAdams, the sports guy for WOLB talk radio, put it best Thursday morning."What's the difference between a new-born puppy and Joe Frazier?" McAdams asked early morning talk show host Bernie McCain."
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | October 23, 2006
I was watching an ESPN Classic program on former heavyweight champion George Foreman over the weekend, and it included his 1973 demolition of Joe Frazier in Jamaica. Sitting at ringside, Howard Cosell bellowed, "He's a big, strong boy." Not quite as bad as "Look at that little monkey run," but I cringed nonetheless. Today, a comment like that would get Steve Lyons fired. Three certainties in life: death, taxes, and a television camera focusing on the head coach immediately after his kicker misses a field goal.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Boxing's fractured heavyweight division has four champions. They are the World Boxing Council's Hasim Rahman, the International Boxing Federation's Chris Byrd, the World Boxing Association's Nikolay Valuev and the World Boxing Organization's Lamon Brewster. Of these, Rahman's belt is considered the most accepted - although not necessarily because he is considered to be the best of the lot. The WBC belt held by Rahman has a lineage that can be traced back through such champions as Lennox Lewis, Larry Holmes, Joe Frazier, Muhammad Ali, Rocky Marciano, Joe Louis -- all the way back to John L. Sullivan in the late 19th century.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun Reporter | January 4, 2007
Bel Air's Victor Bustamante is considered an above-average junior varsity performer, having won three of four bouts on that level, being pinned once. But put the second-year wrestler into a varsity uniform, and he transforms into "super sophomore." That was the case in last night's interdivisional, 39-20 Upper Chesapeake Bay Athletic Conference win over visiting 13th-ranked Aberdeen, when his three near-fall points in the final six seconds secured a 4-2 victory over Eddie Saddler. "I was tired, he was strong, but coach [Craig]
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | October 23, 2006
I was watching an ESPN Classic program on former heavyweight champion George Foreman over the weekend, and it included his 1973 demolition of Joe Frazier in Jamaica. Sitting at ringside, Howard Cosell bellowed, "He's a big, strong boy." Not quite as bad as "Look at that little monkey run," but I cringed nonetheless. Today, a comment like that would get Steve Lyons fired. Three certainties in life: death, taxes, and a television camera focusing on the head coach immediately after his kicker misses a field goal.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Boxing's fractured heavyweight division has four champions. They are the World Boxing Council's Hasim Rahman, the International Boxing Federation's Chris Byrd, the World Boxing Association's Nikolay Valuev and the World Boxing Organization's Lamon Brewster. Of these, Rahman's belt is considered the most accepted - although not necessarily because he is considered to be the best of the lot. The WBC belt held by Rahman has a lineage that can be traced back through such champions as Lennox Lewis, Larry Holmes, Joe Frazier, Muhammad Ali, Rocky Marciano, Joe Louis -- all the way back to John L. Sullivan in the late 19th century.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 28, 2003
WHAT'S THE deal here? Go away for just a little while and celebrities and notables both famous and infamous start dropping like flies. Three were heroes: Lester "Y'all Ain't Eatin' No Chicken In Here" Maddox, former Georgia governor, died Wednesday at 87. Yes, I know what you're thinking: How could I? How could I claim that the racist, segregationist, pickax handle-swinging Maddox -- who wielded the clubs to chase blacks away from his chicken-eating joint in the early 1960s -- is his hero?
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 22, 2001
SITTING IN one of the Muvico complex's 24 theaters late Thursday, I waited for the story of my life to begin. Director Michael Mann's Ali, a biopic of three-time heavyweight champ Muhammad Ali, opens Christmas Day. A preview was held at Muvico, the theaters with the Egyptian theme, in Arundel Mills Mall (also known as Mall Gargantua). I sat in a row reserved for the media and pondered just how Will Smith, a good but not great actor, would pull off duplicating Ali's charisma. (He gave a better-than-expected performance)
TOPIC
By Kram was interviewed by Perspective Editor Mike Adams | June 24, 2001
IN THE 1970s, Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier met in three epic ring battles that were unsurpassed for their savagery. Ali, the matador, and Frazier, the bull who refused to be fooled by Ali's cape. Their first fight in 1971 was a morality play performed before a nation split by racial strife and the Vietnam War. In 1967, Ali, a Black Muslim, was stripped of his title and banned from the ring for refusing to serve in the military. His return in 1970 set the stage for a showdown with Frazier, the heavyweight champ.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun Reporter | January 4, 2007
Bel Air's Victor Bustamante is considered an above-average junior varsity performer, having won three of four bouts on that level, being pinned once. But put the second-year wrestler into a varsity uniform, and he transforms into "super sophomore." That was the case in last night's interdivisional, 39-20 Upper Chesapeake Bay Athletic Conference win over visiting 13th-ranked Aberdeen, when his three near-fall points in the final six seconds secured a 4-2 victory over Eddie Saddler. "I was tired, he was strong, but coach [Craig]
SPORTS
By Robert Seltzer and Robert Seltzer,Knight-Ridder | April 15, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Twenty years ago, they tried to kill each other.Twenty years ago, they came a few thunderous punches short of their goal.Twenty years ago, they put each other in the hospital.My, what a difference two decades make.Last night, Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier attended a black-tie gala at the Hotel Atop the Bellevue, commemorating the 20th anniversary of a night filled with murderous intentions.They treated each other with warmth, grace and civility -- the very qualities that were lacking when they met for the first time in the ring on March 8, 1971, at Madison Square Garden, where Frazier won a unanimous decision.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue has made it clear in the past that he believes only players and coaches should be allowed in the football Hall of Fame, but he conceded yesterday that there should be a place in Canton for Ravens owner Art Modell. "Art Modell is now beginning his fifth decade as an owner," Tagliabue said. "He did a tremendous job with the Browns. Only because of some very extraordinary and dramatic plays was he denied the chance to participate in the Super Bowl as the owner of the Browns.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
The charismatic leader of the Ravens' defense plays football a lot like a boxer. For Ray Lewis, simple tackles often turn into stunning knockdowns. Like the one he administered on Eddie George in the second quarter Sunday. Just as Tennessee's Pro Bowl running back had taken a swing pass in the right flat and was about to turn the corner for a big play, Lewis seemingly came from nowhere to pole-ax George. On a hard, clean hit, George was down in an instant. Instead of a big play, the Titans had a 1-yard gain.
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