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Joe Ehrmann

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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
He was a bearded, Bunyanesque defensive tackle whose rugged play helped the Baltimore Colts to three straight division championships in the 1970s. But Tuesday, when Joe Ehrmann addresses a national gathering convened to deal with the problem of child sexual abuse in sports, he'll take part in one of the most meaningful huddles of his life. His words will weigh heavily on the audience at the two-day Safe to Compete summit in Alexandria, Va., because Ehrmann - minister, motivational speaker and onetime Gilman coach - is himself a survivor of child sexual abuse.
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
He was a bearded, Bunyanesque defensive tackle whose rugged play helped the Baltimore Colts to three straight division championships in the 1970s. But Tuesday, when Joe Ehrmann addresses a national gathering convened to deal with the problem of child sexual abuse in sports, he'll take part in one of the most meaningful huddles of his life. His words will weigh heavily on the audience at the two-day Safe to Compete summit in Alexandria, Va., because Ehrmann - minister, motivational speaker and onetime Gilman coach - is himself a survivor of child sexual abuse.
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NEWS
May 4, 2008
Former Baltimore Colt and NFL star Joe Ehrmann, a community activist, will speak at a "Choose Civility Spring Symposium," to be held from 8 a.m. to noon May 14 at Grace Community Church, 8200 Old Columbia Road, Fulton. The focus will be on making a difference in your community. The program is part of the Choose Civility in Howard County initiative to make the county a national model of respect, consideration, empathy and tolerance, sponsored by the Howard County Library and about 40 community partners.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 16, 2012
A tough-guy tackle of the Baltimore Colts in the 1970s, Joe Ehrmann turned his life over to God and became a Christian minister after his professional football days. Last week, following the Freeh report on Penn State and Joe Paterno, Ehrmann sent out this Tweet: "My faith position affirms there r no unpardonable sins. But PSU leadership that knew re Sandusky n did nothing is as close as u can get. " This wasn't just another disgusted American commenting on the report's conclusion that Paterno, the legendary (and late)
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 29, 1993
It was love at first sight: The first time I met Joe Ehrmann, I fell instantly in love with him.The time was the raucous, howling afterglow of the Baltimore Colts' 1975 playoff win over the Miami Dolphins, when Toni Linhart lifted that overtime field goal through a wintry evening fog at Memorial Stadium.Ehrmann, the rugged defensive tackle, stood in the Colts' locker room afterward, eyes glowing, hands sweeping toward thousands of fans lingering at the ballpark and refusing to go home."Those people out there," he said, shaking his woolly head in a kind of awe. "I'd like to hug every one of 'em, I really would."
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 16, 2012
A tough-guy tackle of the Baltimore Colts in the 1970s, Joe Ehrmann turned his life over to God and became a Christian minister after his professional football days. Last week, following the Freeh report on Penn State and Joe Paterno, Ehrmann sent out this Tweet: "My faith position affirms there r no unpardonable sins. But PSU leadership that knew re Sandusky n did nothing is as close as u can get. " This wasn't just another disgusted American commenting on the report's conclusion that Paterno, the legendary (and late)
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | October 26, 2011
Sports, Baltimore Colts great Joe Ehrmann believes, is not a game. It is too much a part of this country's social fabric, from Saturday morning soccer games to Super Bowl Sundays. It must have a higher purpose than simply to entertain. The striving of the athlete, Ehrmann says, must be equaled by the sober introspection of the men and women who coach them because of the power and influence those coaches carry — in the look on their faces or in the sound of their voices. "One of the great myths in America is that sports build character," Ehrmann writes in his new book, "InSideOut Coaching: How Sports Can Transform Lives.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | October 27, 1994
The big guy's hair is white now and so is his beard. When he walks, he looks like the ex-pro football player he is.He limps. He'll get a hip replacement Dec. 12.This is Joe Ehrmann, a defensive tackle for the Baltimore Colts two decades ago.I see Joe Ehrmann at high school games. I like high school football. So does he."I like high school ball more than pro or college," Ehrmann says. "These kids play football because they enjoy it. But the NFL today . . . it's all money."It's ironic that Joe Ehrmann would be disenchanted because of the money in football.
SPORTS
By Brian Fishman and Brian Fishman,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
Joe Ehrmann is determined to expand his inner-city ministry, The Door, but he needs more money.He's hoping that proceeds from tomorrow's Colts, Cattle & Charity can boost the program's finances. The fund-raising bull roast, 6 to 10 p.m. at the State Fairgrounds in Timonium, will honor ex-Colt Raymond Berry for his contributions to football and in particular his years in Baltimore. Johnny Unitas, Art Donovan and Lenny Moore will be among the more than 25 former Colts participating.There also will be rap and dance performances by kids from The Door as well as a tribute to people who have had an impact on Baltimore's sports history.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
I was deeply touched by Katherine Dunn 's article about Mike Whittles, the courageous football coach at Archbishop Spalding ("'Make every day count,'" Oct. 27). All too often, I find myself saying that one should "live each day as if it's your last," especially when hearing about another tragedy. But living that powerful statement 24/7 is another story. After reading the comments by all those mentioned in this wonderful tribute, I truly believe Coach Whittles should be an example to all of us. He can certainly add me to his list of those praying for him. As I shared my feelings with my wife, she handed me the article by Susan Reimer ("Ehrmann makes a case for building muscles and morals," Oct. 27)
NEWS
October 30, 2011
I was deeply touched by Katherine Dunn 's article about Mike Whittles, the courageous football coach at Archbishop Spalding ("'Make every day count,'" Oct. 27). All too often, I find myself saying that one should "live each day as if it's your last," especially when hearing about another tragedy. But living that powerful statement 24/7 is another story. After reading the comments by all those mentioned in this wonderful tribute, I truly believe Coach Whittles should be an example to all of us. He can certainly add me to his list of those praying for him. As I shared my feelings with my wife, she handed me the article by Susan Reimer ("Ehrmann makes a case for building muscles and morals," Oct. 27)
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | October 26, 2011
Sports, Baltimore Colts great Joe Ehrmann believes, is not a game. It is too much a part of this country's social fabric, from Saturday morning soccer games to Super Bowl Sundays. It must have a higher purpose than simply to entertain. The striving of the athlete, Ehrmann says, must be equaled by the sober introspection of the men and women who coach them because of the power and influence those coaches carry — in the look on their faces or in the sound of their voices. "One of the great myths in America is that sports build character," Ehrmann writes in his new book, "InSideOut Coaching: How Sports Can Transform Lives.
NEWS
By Joe Ehrmann | September 14, 2011
The recent accusations aimed at the University of Miami's athletic department are just the latest example of moral failure involving educational institutions, athletics and athletes. Every scandal seems to debunk the myth that sports builds character. Instead, these stories reinforce the need for student-athletes to be taught right from wrong with the same diligence that they learn their playbooks. Sports — at every age and on every level — seem to have become the victim of a "win-at-all-cost" culture.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 23, 2011
Maybe you'd like to come down the hallway of the junior high school I attended - we called it the Intermediate School - to meet Mr. Gordon T. "Gordie" Ross, a barrel-chested man stuffed into a plaid sport coat, his thick neck trapped by the tab collar of a white shirt and striped tie. He's moon-jawed and pie-faced, with thick brown hair, and as serious as granite block about teaching biology to 7th graders, tolerating no foolishness from the wise...
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | February 13, 2010
Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Art Modell and Joe Ehrmann were honored Friday night as part of the sixth annual Aspire Charity Gala, put on by the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation to recognize those whose "work has made a difference in the lives of others." "We look for worthy candidates, and when Jackie's name was brought up, we just thought she was perfect," Cal Ripken Jr. said. The foundation is a nonprofit organization that "works throughout the country with Boys & Girls Clubs, Police Athletic League centers, inner-city schools and other organizations serving America's most distressed communities," according to its Web site.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 16, 2010
The Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation announced its honorees for its sixth annual Aspire Gala. Olympic gold medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee , Ravens minority owner Art Modell and former Baltimore Colt Joe Ehrmann will be recognized at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront on Feb. 12. Joyner-Kersee will be presented with the Aspire Award, Modell will be honored with the Charles M. Cawley Legacy Award, and Ehrmann will receive the 2010 Cal Sr. Award....
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | June 10, 1993
They were rapping at The Door on Chester Street yesterday.On a steamy afternoon in East Baltimore, Antonio Glover, 16, and his partner, Richard Hughes, 18, performed a rap number that was surprisingly professional.As with all rap music, the words came fast and furious. Onephrase -- "the 'hood's all we know" -- stuck with me. Their rough, crime-ridden neighborhood was all that high school dropouts Antonio and Richard did know before they discovered The Door, the inner-city ministry founded by a former Baltimore Colt tackle, the Rev. Joe Ehrmann.
NEWS
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | January 15, 1995
The Door opens at 9 a.m., but it never really closes."It's a full-time job," said Joe Ehrmann. He's the former Baltimore Colt whose playing field has moved to the streets of East Baltimore, where drugs and guns compete with him for the future of Baltimore's children. But this story, at his request, is not about Joe Ehrmann. He wants you to know about The Door, not the man who opened it.The Door provides the young people in this neighborhood with the academic and spiritual means to make it in the world.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
Former Baltimore Colt and NFL star Joe Ehrmann, a community activist, will speak at a "Choose Civility Spring Symposium," to be held from 8 a.m. to noon May 14 at Grace Community Church, 8200 Old Columbia Road, Fulton. The focus will be on making a difference in your community. The program is part of the Choose Civility in Howard County initiative to make the county a national model of respect, consideration, empathy and tolerance, sponsored by the Howard County Library and about 40 community partners.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 6, 2005
JOSEPH EHRMANN, broad-shouldered Baltimore Colt of famous memory, a pastor of the 4,000- member Grace Fellowship Church, volunteer defensive coach of the Gilman School football team, and founder of a movement called Building Men For Others, took time out from his hectic schedule the other day to speak of things he knows best - football, guys and God. National Football League teams fly him out of Baltimore to speak about these things. Thursday he was due to counsel a group of abusive husbands at a shelter for battered women.
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