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Joe Dimaggio

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NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- New York Yankees legend Joe DiMaggio, whose classic swing and classy persona made him one of the most revered sports figures of the 20th century, died early yesterday after a five-month battle with lung cancer. He was 84.Mr. DiMaggio passed away at his Hollywood, Fla., home from complications after the removal of a cancerous tumor from his lung last October. His funeral will be Thursday in Northern California, with burial in the San Francisco area, where he grew up and began his professional baseball career.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 6, 2009
Prime 9 6 p.m. [MLB Network] The new channel's show picking all-time top nines runs consecutive programs on best center fielders and top home runs. I haven't seen either yet, but I'll go with Willie Mays and Bobby Thomson. You say Joe DiMaggio (left) and Bill Mazeroski. Or maybe Ken Griffey Jr. and Kirk Gibson. In any case, you can argue with your television from 6 to 7.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael E. Waller and By Michael E. Waller,Sun Staff | October 22, 2000
"Joe DiMaggio, The Hero's Life," by Richard Ben Cramer. Simon & Schuster. 560 pages. $28. In 6,821 at bats in 13 years as a New York Yankee, Joe DiMaggio hit 361 home runs and struck out only 369 times, an awesome achievement recited repeatedly by knowledgeable baseball fans as the ultimate proof of his greatness. In his 84 years at the game of real life, DiMaggio hit few home runs and struck out countless times, a tragedy covered up for years by the DiMaggio Myth Machine. That's the core of Richard Ben Cramer's gripping character study, "Joe DiMaggio, The Hero's Life."
FEATURES
By Howard Cohen and Howard Cohen,McClatchy-Tribune | April 3, 2008
Energy drinks charged into the U.S. market in 1997 with Red Bull and its claim: "Improves performance ... increased concentration ... stimulates the metabolism." At 66.7 milligrams of caffeine per 8.3-ounce can, that would be a mere blip in the bold new world of energy drinks. A cup of coffee, by contrast, has 107.5 milligrams. Today, provocative handles like Cocaine (since changed to No Name, owing to a 2007 Food and Drug Administration ruling against naming a product after an illegal drug)
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | June 18, 1991
THIS SEASON marks the 50th anniversary of Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak in the summer of '41, one of the few records in baseball or in anything else that has not been bested in the past half-century -- and one that may not be.Stephen Jay Gould, Darwinian scholar, reports in the New York Review of Books that Ed Purcell, a Nobel laureate in physics who has conducted a study of baseball streaks and slumps, has concluded that DiMaggio's streak was...
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 16, 1991
It's a good thing that Joe DiMaggio used to get seasick on boats. Otherwise, he might have followed his immigrant father's career as a commercial fisherman and not become one of America's most durable heroes.The tidbit about Joltin' Joe's motion sickness is revealed in the latest edition of the Arts & Entertainment series "Biography." Although hardly breaking new ground, "Joe DiMaggio -- The Way It Was" (at 8 p.m. on the basic cable service, with a midnight repeat) is a nice and concise profile of one of baseball's greatest players.
NEWS
March 9, 1999
JUST THINK what Joe DiMaggio would have accomplished if he'd played more than 13 seasons in the Bigs.World War II came along. Like Ted Williams and other stars of his generation, he served his nation as a soldier. Exploiting his exceptional skills, earning the adoration of multitudes, entertaining a nation, would wait.Even missing three seasons that could have been his best, Joe DiMaggio compiled a lifetime batting average of .325, led the American League in home runs twice, in runs-batted-in twice, in batting average twice and was its most valuable player thrice.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
Throw your best stuff, Richard Ben Cramer, you with the Pulitzer Prize and the big book contract. Bring on the face-high fastball, or maybe the wicked curve that always buckles their knees.This isn't covering the Afghanistan war, you know. This this isn't chasing presidential candidate Bob Dole -- "the Bobster," you tagged him -- through the snows of New Hampshire. This time you have taken on Joe DiMaggio, and the great DiMaggio never loses. You said so yourself."It didn't matter what game he was in, he was the best player on the field, and he was going to beat you somehow," Cramer says.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
CHESTERTOWN - Here on the Eastern Shore, of all places, a different Joe DiMaggio has taken shape. He emerged from a small wooden house in a room furnished with a desk, computer, a few books, lots of files and one of those digital-age chairs that looks like a cross between a giant straw hat and a wire sculpture. Richard Ben Cramer sat in the chair for a few years of writing after a few years of reporting and has given new meaning to Paul Simon's lyric: "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?"
SPORTS
April 5, 1994
Celebrities who threw out the ceremonial first pitches in American League games on Opening Day:Site .. .. .. .. .. .. ..CelebrityBaltimore .. .. .. ..Gov. SchaeferBoston .. .. .. .. .Nancy KerriganCleveland .. .. .. ..Pres. ClintonNew York .. .. .. .. .Joe DiMaggioToronto .. .. .. .Michael Wilcox-aa-Courage To Come Back Award winner
SPORTS
January 10, 2007
ELECTED BY BBWAA PLAYERS Hank Aaron, 1982 Luis Aparicio, 1984 Luke Appling, 1964 Ernie Banks, 1977 Johnny Bench, 1989 Yogi Berra, 1972 Wade Boggs, 2005 Lou Boudreau, 1970 George Brett, 1999 Lou Brock, 1985 Roy Campanella, 1969 Rod Carew, 1991 Gary Carter, 2003 Roberto Clemente, 1973 Ty Cobb, 1936 Mickey Cochrane, 1947 Eddie Collins, 1939 Joe Cronin, 1956 Bill Dickey, 1954 Joe DiMaggio, 1955 Carlton Fisk, 2000 Jimmie Foxx, 1951 ...
SPORTS
January 7, 2006
Good morning -- Joe Gibbs -- Back in the playoffs after all these years and you've still got to go up against a quarterback named Simms. Question of the day Will Texas quarterback Vince Young be successful in the NFL? Selected responses to today's question will be printed Tuesday on The Kickoff page. Please e-mail your answer (about 25 words) to sports@baltsun.com by 3 p.m.Monday. Include your name, address and a daytime telephone number for verification purposes. THEY SAID IT "No guts, no glory."
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | October 30, 2005
Several hundred folks embarked on a treasure hunt inside the B&O Railroad Museum, but not for train-related artifacts. This hunt the 2005 Annual Benefit & Auction for the Believe in Tomorrow National Childrens Foundation was for sports and entertainment memorabilia. About 100 items signed by the likes of Tony Bennett, Hootie and the Blowfish, Robin Williams, Shaquille ONeal and Johnny Unitas were up for grabs. "We've got a pretty rare Joe DiMaggio [autographed] baseball and a signed Ted Williams jersey," said foundation founder/director Brian Morrison.
NEWS
By Stephen Budiansky | May 12, 2004
THE EXAMPLE of Pat Tillman, who turned down a $3.6 million NFL contract to enlist as an Army private and who died last month fighting in Afghanistan, is more than a story of one man's exceptional sacrifice: It is a story of one nation's loss of its moral compass. In World War II, the historian (and ex-Marine) William Manchester recalled, "everybody who was fit went." Sports heroes went - Joe DiMaggio, Hank Greenberg, Joe Louis. Entertainers and movie stars went - Red Skelton, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Henry Fonda, Jimmy Stewart, Clark Gable, Glenn Miller.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 13, 2004
IMAGINE. A LEAGUE full of Ichiros. Baseball back to its small-ball roots. Slap-hitting. Hit and run. Hitting in 56-game streaks like the Yankee Clipper - Joe DiMaggio - and hitting for average, like the Splendid Splinter - Ted Williams. Do you think the Splinter was a BALCO customer? Can a Splinter be juiced? Imagine gap-hitting. Base stealing. Suicide squeezes. Imagine the acumen of a manager not waiting for the three-run bomb to break open the game. Imagine the battle cry: Hit 'em where they ain't, just like Wee Willie Keeler used to say. And let's not forget that 100-year-old weapon of offensive production, the Baltimore Chop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Canfield and Kevin Canfield,HARTFORD COURANT | August 7, 2003
Summer Hymns, a countrified-rock band from Athens, Ga., recently released a brilliant record titled Clemency. On it is a song called "Pete Rose Affinity," the tale of singer Zachary Gresham's youthful quest to nab an autograph from Major League Baseball's all-time hits leader. "When I was a little boy," sings Gresham, "I tried to con an autograph at the Fulton County Stadium/ with the Braves against the Cincinnati Reds/ Pete Rose was the object of my affinity/ I wanted to pretend I'd lost an arm to some kind of ailment/ I tucked it in my sleeve."
SPORTS
May 29, 1997
Blue Jays: Joe Carter passed Joe DiMaggio on the career home run list, hitting a three-run homer in a four-run third last night against the Yankees. Carter, who has 362 homers, moved into sole possession of 41st place.Cubs: The Cubs failed for the ninth time this season to stretch a winning streak to three.Pub Date: 5/29/97
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 6, 2009
Prime 9 6 p.m. [MLB Network] The new channel's show picking all-time top nines runs consecutive programs on best center fielders and top home runs. I haven't seen either yet, but I'll go with Willie Mays and Bobby Thomson. You say Joe DiMaggio (left) and Bill Mazeroski. Or maybe Ken Griffey Jr. and Kirk Gibson. In any case, you can argue with your television from 6 to 7.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Olesker and By Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | November 10, 2002
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy, by Jane Leavy. HarperCollins. 304 pages. $23.95. Among Jews of my baby-boom generation, baseball's Sandy Koufax was a kind of inside joke. Among ourselves, we kvelled over him. But, if a gentile friend mentioned the Dodgers' glorious lefty and his religious heritage, we were apt to strike a nonchalant pose and say, "Koufax? Uh, yeah, he's probably one of the better Jewish ballplayers." As if. As if there were hundreds of others, past and present. As if we could hold aloft Hank Greenberg and Al Rosen and simply keep going forever, instead of digging for the likes of Mike Epstein and Ron Bloomberg and Rod Carew, who was never actually a Jew but at least married one. When you're this desperate for role models, close counts.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | October 22, 2002
SAN FRANCISCO - By noon yesterday, the fog had lifted off China Basin, revealing the stunning skyline of a real American city. And in that breathtaking vista is one of the most unique, charismatic ballparks in baseball - a place where one of the oldest teams in the major leagues plays. Ah, such glory. A classic setting for the potential evolution of a classic World Series. With its unique right-field "splash" wall and its quirky and intentionally asymmetric design, Pacific Bell Park is only the latest, greatest thing about San Francisco, home of the Giants since 1958.
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