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Joe Camel

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NEWS
By Newsday | June 2, 1994
Joe Camel has been set free.The Federal Trade Commission has voted not to seek restrictions on Joe Camel ads despite a staff finding that the suave dromedary encourages youngsters to start smoking cigarettes, the head of a major anti-smoking group said yesterday."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 1998
A few months ago, Patrick Coughlin, a San Diego lawyer involved in a lawsuit against R. J. Reynolds, was thinking of asking for a $50 million fee for his firm, a sum that might strike some people as high for a case that the cigarette maker had settled for $10 million. Then Coughlin heard that the five lawyers who represented Texas in its $17.3 billion settlement with tobacco companies this year planned to shoot for the moon before the arbitrators who were to determine both their fees and his. Alarm bells went off and within weeks, Coughlin's fee request had shot up to $650 million.
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NEWS
March 17, 1998
WHILE CONGRESS and the courts continue to wrestle with the mammoth tobacco settlement, teen-age smoking puffs along. Despite the cigarette manufacturers' denials, evidence mounts that targeting youths has been a large part of their merchandising. That perhaps explains the community's enthusiasm for this year's Tobacco-Free Kids Week.Despite laws against selling tobacco to minors, a lot of children are obtaining cigarettes. Of Maryland's 12th-graders, 54 percent say they have smoked; 26 percent of those are considered "regular smokers" because they consume at least a half-pack each day.It is easy to see how these high-school seniors became regulars.
NEWS
November 18, 1998
ATTORNEY General J. Joseph Curran Jr. does not need another headache as he ponders whether Maryland should join other states in a massive tobacco settlement.But Joe Camel might have put a little more stress on the attorney general. A Harvard study released yesterday showed that smoking by college students, normally lower than their younger high school counterparts, has jumped precipitously. Experts say is a result of heavy tobacco-company advertising and marketing campaigns aimed at youngsters and starring Joe Camel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In another blow to an industry under siege, the Federal Trade Commission charged yesterday that R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. illegally targets minors with its "Joe Camel" advertising campaign.The agency asserted in an administrative complaint that the company violated federal fair trade practice laws by promoting a lethal and addictive product to children who could not legally purchase or use it.This is the first time that the commission has accused the tobacco industry of peddling its products to minors.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 11, 1991
New studies demonstrate that the cartoon camel at the center of an elaborate advertising campaign for Camel cigarettes appeals far more to children than to adults.Several researchers suggest that this and similar campaigns are such a pernicious influence on the nation's health that cigarette advertising should be totally banned.The researchers, from universities around the country, singled out the Camel cigarette campaign involving a cartoon character called Old Joe Camel. Although R. J. Reynolds, the tobacco company that produces Camels, said its advertisements were aimed at adults, the researchers said the campaign has been "far more successful at marketing Camel cigarettes to children than to adults."
NEWS
By Sylvia Fulwood & Barbara C. Ferguson | November 18, 1992
THERE are about 953 billboards in Baltimore City, of which 45 percent advertise alcohol and tobacco products.These billboards are located next to schools, beside churches, in front of homes, on highways and along scenic city vistas. They are 24-hour-a-day advertisements that constantly barrage children with messages about how to be successful in today's world. These billboards cannot be turned off or thrown away, like television or newspapers, and parents cannot protect their children from their deadly messages.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 26, 1998
As Will Rogers might have said, "I never met a man I didn't like, except those sellouts on the Maryland Senate's Budget and Taxation Committee."By a vote of 7 to 6, those brave souls have given us their solution to the killing effects of cigarettes: Smoke 'em if you got 'em, and we'll pass out the oxygen tents when you need 'em if we can hear your raspy cries echoing down noisy hospital corridors as we traipse off to the bank.The senators' vote Tuesday rebuffed efforts of health advocates - that's a catch-phrase for doctors, nurses, concerned parents, confused teen-agers, the short of breath, the hopelessly addicted, the ones who wish they had a spare lung, the dying worried about loved ones they're leaving behind, the mourners at graveside - to raise taxes on cigarettes by $1.50 a pack, backed by evidence in other, more enlightened states that, if you can keep kids from smoking until age 20, you'll almost certainly keep them from smoking their entire lives.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 1998
A few months ago, Patrick Coughlin, a San Diego lawyer involved in a lawsuit against R. J. Reynolds, was thinking of asking for a $50 million fee for his firm, a sum that might strike some people as high for a case that the cigarette maker had settled for $10 million. Then Coughlin heard that the five lawyers who represented Texas in its $17.3 billion settlement with tobacco companies this year planned to shoot for the moon before the arbitrators who were to determine both their fees and his. Alarm bells went off and within weeks, Coughlin's fee request had shot up to $650 million.
NEWS
By Marjorie Garber | April 2, 1992
HAMLET: Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?Polonius: By th' mass and 'tis -- like a camel indeed.Hamlet: Methinks it is like a weasel.Polonius: It is backed like a weasel.Hamlet: Or like a whale.Polonius: Very like a whale.The surgeon general, Dr. Antonia Novello, and the American Medical Association (AMA) have called for the removal of Joe Camel from billboards and printed ads because the Camel cigarette character with the long sleek snout is "too seductive for children."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 26, 1998
As Will Rogers might have said, "I never met a man I didn't like, except those sellouts on the Maryland Senate's Budget and Taxation Committee."By a vote of 7 to 6, those brave souls have given us their solution to the killing effects of cigarettes: Smoke 'em if you got 'em, and we'll pass out the oxygen tents when you need 'em if we can hear your raspy cries echoing down noisy hospital corridors as we traipse off to the bank.The senators' vote Tuesday rebuffed efforts of health advocates - that's a catch-phrase for doctors, nurses, concerned parents, confused teen-agers, the short of breath, the hopelessly addicted, the ones who wish they had a spare lung, the dying worried about loved ones they're leaving behind, the mourners at graveside - to raise taxes on cigarettes by $1.50 a pack, backed by evidence in other, more enlightened states that, if you can keep kids from smoking until age 20, you'll almost certainly keep them from smoking their entire lives.
NEWS
March 17, 1998
WHILE CONGRESS and the courts continue to wrestle with the mammoth tobacco settlement, teen-age smoking puffs along. Despite the cigarette manufacturers' denials, evidence mounts that targeting youths has been a large part of their merchandising. That perhaps explains the community's enthusiasm for this year's Tobacco-Free Kids Week.Despite laws against selling tobacco to minors, a lot of children are obtaining cigarettes. Of Maryland's 12th-graders, 54 percent say they have smoked; 26 percent of those are considered "regular smokers" because they consume at least a half-pack each day.It is easy to see how these high-school seniors became regulars.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
He offers a nicotine-stained paw, or maybe it's a hoof. Hard to tell with so much smoke swirling around."Hi," he says. "Joe Camel."We thought you were dead."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In another blow to an industry under siege, the Federal Trade Commission charged yesterday that R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. illegally targets minors with its "Joe Camel" advertising campaign.The agency asserted in an administrative complaint that the company violated federal fair trade practice laws by promoting a lethal and addictive product to children who could not legally purchase or use it.This is the first time that the commission has accused the tobacco industry of peddling its products to minors.
NEWS
September 7, 1996
IN ONE BREATH, the tobacco industry squawks that new regulations on tobacco advertising aimed at young people would cost thousands of jobs in an industry based on a legal crop. In the next breath, they argue the rules aren't necessary since smoking by minors is already illegal in all 50 states.Such contradictions and contortions will become all too familiar as the tobacco industry prepares a full-fledged legal attack on the regulations that became final with their publication in the Federal Register.
FEATURES
By Sheryl Stolberg and Sheryl Stolberg,Los Angeles Times | August 22, 1995
He's got the slickest race car, the hippest Ray-Bans, the raddest saxophone. He's a whiz on the harmonica, he shoots a mean game of pool, and, of course, he always gets the girl. He's so famous that 6-year-olds recognize him as quickly as Mickey Mouse. And, like Mickey, he's only a cartoon.He's Joe Camel, and if ever there was a lightning rod in the debate over whether tobacco advertising lures young people to smoke, this four-legged dude with the attitude is it. He's been picked apart by epidemiologists and reported upon in prestigious medical journals.
FEATURES
By Sheryl Stolberg and Sheryl Stolberg,Los Angeles Times | August 22, 1995
He's got the slickest race car, the hippest Ray-Bans, the raddest saxophone. He's a whiz on the harmonica, he shoots a mean game of pool, and, of course, he always gets the girl. He's so famous that 6-year-olds recognize him as quickly as Mickey Mouse. And, like Mickey, he's only a cartoon.He's Joe Camel, and if ever there was a lightning rod in the debate over whether tobacco advertising lures young people to smoke, this four-legged dude with the attitude is it. He's been picked apart by epidemiologists and reported upon in prestigious medical journals.
NEWS
September 7, 1996
IN ONE BREATH, the tobacco industry squawks that new regulations on tobacco advertising aimed at young people would cost thousands of jobs in an industry based on a legal crop. In the next breath, they argue the rules aren't necessary since smoking by minors is already illegal in all 50 states.Such contradictions and contortions will become all too familiar as the tobacco industry prepares a full-fledged legal attack on the regulations that became final with their publication in the Federal Register.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 2, 1994
Joe Camel has been set free.The Federal Trade Commission has voted not to seek restrictions on Joe Camel ads despite a staff finding that the suave dromedary encourages youngsters to start smoking cigarettes, the head of a major anti-smoking group said yesterday."
NEWS
By Sylvia Fulwood & Barbara C. Ferguson | November 18, 1992
THERE are about 953 billboards in Baltimore City, of which 45 percent advertise alcohol and tobacco products.These billboards are located next to schools, beside churches, in front of homes, on highways and along scenic city vistas. They are 24-hour-a-day advertisements that constantly barrage children with messages about how to be successful in today's world. These billboards cannot be turned off or thrown away, like television or newspapers, and parents cannot protect their children from their deadly messages.
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