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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Jodie Foster is in Baltimore looking at locations for an episode of "House of Cards" that she is set to direct for Season 2 of the political drama. The episode is expected to start filming next week, according to a source who spoke to The Sun on condition of anonymity. The source said she might be directing two episodes of the political thriller, which has been the formula used with other directors. Both Media Rights Capital, the production company making "House of Cards," and Netflix, the company distributing it, declined comment Monday when asked by The Sun for confirmation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Jodie Foster is in Baltimore looking at locations for an episode of "House of Cards" that she is set to direct for Season 2 of the political drama. The episode is expected to start filming next week, according to a source who spoke to The Sun on condition of anonymity. The source said she might be directing two episodes of the political thriller, which has been the formula used with other directors. Both Media Rights Capital, the production company making "House of Cards," and Netflix, the company distributing it, declined comment Monday when asked by The Sun for confirmation.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Bayard Russell walked out onto his front porch one chilly afternoon last December to wait for the mailman. The 76-year-old retired carpenter has lived nearly his entire life on Southern Avenue, 45 years in one house, and has fashioned his surroundings to suit his needs. A small aviary in the basement houses the canaries he raises; two upstairs bedrooms have been converted into greenhouses for starting vegetables from seed. But the porch remains a porch, a place where he can sit and wait for the world to come calling.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | April 4, 2008
Is Jodie Foster psyching herself up to play the Cowardly Lioness? Why else would she follow her role in The Brave One as a fearful New Yorker who becomes a vigilante with a phobic San Franciscan who becomes a woman of adventure in Nim's Island? Foster may be working out some personal dilemmas with these forays into the bold and the timid, but not, I think, any artistic issues. The escapist comedy in Nim's Island is as coarse and cheap as the vengeance drama in The Brave One. Her character typifies everything that goes off course in this all-over-the-map movie.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 3, 1995
Jodie Foster brought "Home" to Baltimore last night and more than 1,000 people showed up at the Senator Theatre on York Road to give her a rousing Charm City welcome."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | December 27, 1991
JODIE FOSTER, cited for her role as a psycho-stalking cop in the movie "Silence of the Lambs," plus her film directorial debut in "Little Man Tate," was picked as Entertainer of the Year in this week's Entertainment Weekly."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
A trio of actresses with four Best Actress Oscars among them -- Jodie Foster, Holly Hunter and Anne Bancroft -- will make Baltimore their temporary home next month during the filming of "Home for the Holidays," a romantic comedy.Ms. Foster will co-produce and direct the movie, in which Ms. Hunter and Ms. Bancroft play a daughter and her mother coming to terms during a hectic Thanksgiving celebration.Over the past two weeks, Ms. Foster and a film production team have been in Baltimore scouting locations, auditioning for smaller cast parts and interviewing for production employees.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 28, 1994
As Cary Grant never said: Jodie, Jodie, Jodie.Here she is, star, producer, America's sweetheart, double Oscar winner, Yale honors grad, legendary object of a failed assassin's ardor, all of 32. How much intelligence, talent, power and beauty can be jammed into one small package? Surely, when you're approaching Jodie Foster, you're getting pretty close to the limit.And it is a small package: lissome and dynamically intelligent, Foster is much less prepossessing in person than on screen, where the camera magically magnifies her presence and lovingly charts the delicate geometry of her bone structure.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 12, 1991
Simon Says:Do you think the Kennedys could get a family rate on exorcisms?Never trust anyone who puts milk in his tea.Aww c'mon, could Kevin Costner really be that humble?I have never watched a duller sport than polo.Could cab drivers really be comfortable sitting on those beads?In one case, a woman midshipman at the Naval Academy is abducted from her room, dragged to a men's washroom, handcuffed to a urinal, taunted and photographed and, after much foot-dragging, her abductors are given demerits.
FEATURES
By Jenny Komatsu and Jenny Komatsu,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 22, 1995
The world premiere for the film "Home for the Holidays," directed by Jodie Foster and shot in Baltimore, will be held at the Senator Theatre at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 2. Ms. Foster and actress Peggy Rajski will take part in the premiere, which benefits the Maryland Producers Club. The ticket price is $60 and includes a sidewalk block unveiling in front of the theater, a champagne dinner reception and a showing of the film, followed by a dessert reception. Tickets are available at the Senator Theatre daily from 1:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., cash or check only; call (410)
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 9, 2007
THE FANCY FORMAL AFFAIR WAS ALIVE and well at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel last weekend. In fact, the bi-annual fundraiser for the Hospice of Baltimore and Gilchrest Center for Hospice Care was so eagerly anticipated, the party had to be moved into a larger ballroom to accommodate more than 800 guests. Not only were all the gentlemen in their tuxedo best, but most of the women wore floor-length dresses. "I'd say [that's] because of Mr. and Mrs. Modell," said retired stock trader Roula Passon, referring to honorary chairs Art and Pat Modell.
FEATURES
September 17, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- The Jodie Foster vigilante flick The Brave One scared up $14 million at the box office to become the weekend's top film. The Warner Bros. tale of revenge transcended gender, appealing to older women as well as men who might naturally be expected to enjoy the violent, R-rated film. "Revenge movies often appeal to men, but the fact that Jodie Foster was in it brought in the women," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Media By Numbers. "That combination worked."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 14, 2007
Jodie Foster, who earned an Oscar nomination 32 years ago for playing a child prostitute in Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver, plays a more cultured character in The Brave One, an illegitimate heir to that incendiary mid-1970s masterpiece. Here she's a radio personality who reports poetically on the changing face of New York until her own face is beaten to a pulp. Then the whole thing turns into trash with flash. The Brave One (Warner Bros.) Starring Jodie Foster, Terrence Howard. Directed by Neil Jordan.
NEWS
September 12, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Now appearing ... The city police department's ousted spokesman finds a new crime-and-media combo, at America's Most Wanted. Maryland baltimoresun.com/vozzella C. Miles visits Baltimore Former radio shock jock C. Miles returned to Baltimore recently, nine years after he was was canned at WOLB. Maryland baltimoresun.com/kane OTHER VOICES Tanika White on N.Y. Fashion Week. -- Today Rob Kasper picks tomatoes -- Food Jay Hancock on Ferris Baker Watts -- Business 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Judy Chicago -- The artist best known for her pioneering feminist work The Dinner Party, ' pays homage to her secular Jewish upbringing during the 1940s and '50s.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | August 23, 2006
Compulsions are ideas or impulses that repeatedly well up in the mind: They can infect dictators and inspire filmmakers. We were reminded of that by a forthcoming autobiography by Kola Boof, 37, a Sudanese poet and novelist. She claims to have been Osama bin Laden's sex slave and contends in her book that the al-Qaida terrorist leader was so obsessed with the singer Whitney Houston, he wanted to marry her and contemplated killing her husband, Bobby Brown. The item, first reported in the New York Post, summoned other peculiar fascinations of madmen - suspected and confirmed: North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il, best known for threatening nuclear brinkmanship with the free world, has long been a fan of basketball star Michael Jordan.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
Vincent J. Fuller, 75, the star Washington attorney who defended would-be presidential assassin John Hinckley, died of lung cancer Wednesday at a hospice in Montgomery County. During his career, Mr. Fuller defended a number of notables, including boxer Mike Tyson and Teamsters Union boss Jimmy Hoffa. But he was best known for his successful insanity defense of Hinckley, who shot President Reagan, press secretary James Brady and two law enforcers outside a Washington hotel on March 30, 1981.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 14, 1991
Dennis Hopper adds to his credits for fascinating, loopy characters, but Jodie Foster is not likely to be up for any more Best Actress awards from their co-starring roles in "Backtrack," an edgy, erotic film premiering on the Showtime network tonight.Although it saw brief theatrical release in Europe, the film has been re-edited by director Hopper for its domestic premiere. But evidence of much editing is the last thing to be found in "Backtrack." (It premieres at 8 o'clock, with future screenings Thursday and Dec. 23.)
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | October 22, 1991
Jodie Foster's feature directing debut, "Little Man Tate," is an efficient piece of feel-good fakery. It should trick a lot of people into thinking they're seeing something sensitive, but more discerning viewers will be annoyed by the narrative and emotional corners the film constantly cuts.More disappointing than annoying are two of the mediocre performances turned in by the three leads. Foster herself -- considered by many the brightest of our under-30 actresses -- trowels on her Oscar-winning, blue-collar "Accused" mannerisms.
FEATURES
January 24, 2006
Critic's Pick-- In Siam to tutor his kids, a British teacher (Jodie Foster, above) clashes, then bonds with a ruler in Anna and the King (8 p.m.-11 p.m., AMC).
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | September 23, 2005
For Jodie Foster, it's all about transformation. That's what attracted her to the role of Kyle Pratt in Flightplan, her first American movie in three years. The two-time Oscar-winning actress plays a widow whose claims that her daughter has disappeared during a trans-Atlantic flight are met with skepticism and then denial by the flight crew. Foster says what drew her to Flightplan, which opens today, was the opportunity to portray Kyle first as a coldly analytical career woman, then as a self-doubting, possibly delusional widow, then as a fiercely determined and protective mother, all in the space of 88 minutes.
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