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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | June 20, 2007
Maryland added 3,600 jobs during May - about average for recent months, but a jump from the 600 created in April, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics said yesterday. The unemployment rate was 3.6 percent, unchanged from April but down from 3.9 percent a year earlier, a drop the bureau said was statistically significant. Maryland continued to do better than the nation as a whole; the national unemployment rate was 4.5 percent in May. "It's more of the same," said Richard P. Clinch, director of economic research at the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute.
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NEWS
April 6, 2012
Many recent op-eds in The Sun have discussed Gov.Martin O'Malley's wind bill. To those concerned about the cost of wind energy, I would observe that doing nothing might prove even more expensive in the long run. While installing the wind turbines may raise residential electricity rates by as much as $1.50 a month, it will benefit Maryland and the world by using more renewable energy. Wind energy is beneficial to Maryland in many ways: it is renewable, it pollutes less, it is not expensive, it provides a lot of energy, it will reduce U.S. dependence on imported fuels and it will create local jobs.
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BUSINESS
March 16, 1997
Job creation: Start-up businesses remain a good source of new jobs, finds Dun & Bradstreet Corp. The financial research firm found that more than 170,000 new businesses created nearly 847,000 jobs last year, up 15 percent from the number of jobs created by new firms in 1995.Plugging the hole: In a rating of franchises, Income Opportunities magazine gave American Leak Detection its top spot. ALD finds and fixes leaks in homes, swimming pools, water mains and anything else that could spring a gusher.
NEWS
By John J. Walters | June 14, 2010
Understanding the state and federal reports on the year-old American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is virtually impossible, despite the promise of "unprecedented levels of accountability and transparency" by President Barack Obama and Congress. Federal and state governments' efforts to inform the public often confuse, according to an analysis by the Maryland Public Policy Institute. Not only are there discrepancies between federal and state information, but there are also major differences within federal reports on the official stimulus website, recovery.
NEWS
October 19, 1994
It's not unusual for perception and reality to differ. But if statistics can be accepted as reality (and that's not always a given), there is some good news on the job creation front. Yes, there are plenty of minimum-wage, dead-end, burger-flipping jobs out there. But statistics tell a brighter story.Contrary to public perceptions -- and to a lot of political rhetoric -- most of the 5.5 million new jobs created during the past two-and-a-half years have come in occupations that pay more, not less, than the nation's average wage of about $15.50 an hour.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2008
Maryland employers added a slim 900 jobs in January as the drag of a faltering economy took hold, the federal government said yesterday. In another sign of slowing growth, the Labor Department also significantly lowered its count of jobs created in the state last year - 20,600 rather than the nearly 30,000 that preliminary statistics showed. Employers added more than 30,000 jobs in each of the previous three years. Andy Bauer, regional economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond's Baltimore office, wasn't surprised to hear about the less rosy picture of 2007.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
A growing shortage of moderate- and low-income housing in Harford is pricing many county residents out of the market, says a new report.While Harford's housing costs overall remain lower than those in other suburban counties in the region, households earning less than $25,000 a year "face significant housing problems," says the report by the the nonprofit Enterprise Foundation of Columbia."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Although many Americans believe that most new jobs are going to hamburger flippers and Wal-Mart clerks, the reality is surprisingly different: More than three-fifths of the jobs created over the past year have gone to managers and professionals.As thousands of former middle managers at IBM, General Motors and other companies can attest, white-collar workers were hit especially hard in the recent recession. But government statistics now show a steady climb in the hiring of white-collar workers.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A Labor Department report showing a sharp and unexpected surge in the number of jobs created in June gave financial markets jitters about inflation yesterday.While the unemployment rate held steady at 6 percent, the increase in business payrolls of 379,000 jobs was considerably stronger than analysts had anticipated.Coming on top of sizable upward revisions in the number of jobs created in April and May, the report seemed likely to push the Federal Reserve closer to another increase in short-term interest rates to prevent a surge in inflation -- a move it opted not to take at a policy-setting meeting this week.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | January 7, 2006
An economic public-relations blitz by the Bush administration yesterday included a stop at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, where Labor Secretary Elaine L. Chao promoted a jobs training program and the "good news for America's workers." As it turns out, it wasn't ideal timing for the full-court press. Labor Department numbers released earlier in the day showed the nation's employers adding 108,000 jobs last month, less than expected and weaker than needed to keep up with population growth.
BUSINESS
By Don Lee and Tribune Newspapers | April 3, 2010
The U.S. economy added 162,000 new payroll jobs in March, the Labor Department said Friday, marking the first sign of substantial job growth since the recession and the largest one-month increase in three years. The job gains, however, weren't strong enough to bring down the unemployment rate, which remained at 9.7 percent in March for the third month in a row. And economists were cautious, saying they expect the labor market recovery to be slow. Part of the job increase in March, 48,000 positions, came from the hiring of temporary workers by the Census Bureau.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2008
Maryland employers added a slim 900 jobs in January as the drag of a faltering economy took hold, the federal government said yesterday. In another sign of slowing growth, the Labor Department also significantly lowered its count of jobs created in the state last year - 20,600 rather than the nearly 30,000 that preliminary statistics showed. Employers added more than 30,000 jobs in each of the previous three years. Andy Bauer, regional economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond's Baltimore office, wasn't surprised to hear about the less rosy picture of 2007.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | June 20, 2007
Maryland added 3,600 jobs during May - about average for recent months, but a jump from the 600 created in April, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics said yesterday. The unemployment rate was 3.6 percent, unchanged from April but down from 3.9 percent a year earlier, a drop the bureau said was statistically significant. Maryland continued to do better than the nation as a whole; the national unemployment rate was 4.5 percent in May. "It's more of the same," said Richard P. Clinch, director of economic research at the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | June 1, 2007
The Baltimore metropolitan area created more than 40,000 jobs in the first half of the decade, propelled largely by Anne Arundel County, new census numbers show. Anne Arundel employers added 25,700 jobs from 2000 to 2005, well more than half the 41,700-job gain across the region. The county - home to Fort Meade and the National Security Agency - is a prime government-contracting beneficiary. But it also showed growth in a variety of other sectors, from health care to tourism. The Census Bureau, which released the numbers yesterday, draws its data from reports employers make to the Internal Revenue Service and Social Security Administration.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | March 9, 2007
Unemployment in Maryland dropped to a low 3.8 percent in January, the federal government said yesterday, but employers didn't add very many jobs - just 1,300. The preliminary numbers, adjusted by the Labor Department to account for seasonal variations, continue a trend of conflicting messages about the state's job market. The unemployment rate, which improved from 3.9 percent in December, is nearly as good as it was in the economic boom years of 1999 and 2000. But job growth has turned fairly anemic.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | January 7, 2006
An economic public-relations blitz by the Bush administration yesterday included a stop at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, where Labor Secretary Elaine L. Chao promoted a jobs training program and the "good news for America's workers." As it turns out, it wasn't ideal timing for the full-court press. Labor Department numbers released earlier in the day showed the nation's employers adding 108,000 jobs last month, less than expected and weaker than needed to keep up with population growth.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
A growing shortage of moderate- and low-income housing in Harford is pricing many county residents out of the market, says a new report.While Harford's housing costs overall remain lower than those in other suburban counties in the region, households earning less than $25,000 a year "face significant housing problems," says the report by the the nonprofit Enterprise Foundation of Columbia."
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | September 20, 1993
PRESIDENT Clinton, in launching the administration's campaign for NAFTA last Tuesday, claimed that the proposed trade pact with Mexico would create a million U.S. jobs. Embarrassed White House aides explained that the president had misspoken, and Mr. Clinton hastily retracted the claim.The president's wishful slip was understandable, for the jobs issue is a political hot button. The worry about jobs powered Mr. Clinton's victory over George Bush last November.More Americans are losing jobs as corporations downsize; more younger Americans cannot find jobs in their chosen fields.
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