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NEWS
May 6, 2014
The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 6.3 percent in April from 6.7 percent in March, the lowest it has been since September 2008, when it was 6.1 percent. However , The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not count people who have given up looking for work as unemployed. There are still more than 92 million Americans who remain out of the work force. The bureau noted that the civilian labor force dropped by 806,000 last month, following an increase of 503,000 in March. The number of Americans who are not in the work force rose in April to over 92.5 million, nearly 1 million more than in the previous month, when 91.6 million were not in the labor force, including an aging population that is continuing to head into retirement.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 29, 2014
The Labor Department is expected to report this week that the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent. But that hardly tells the story. The jobless rate may be down from its recession peak of 10 percent, but much of this results from adults - discouraged by the lack of decent job openings - having given up altogether. They are neither employed nor looking for work. Only about half of the drop in the adult participation rate may be attributed to the Baby Boom generation reaching retirement age. Lacking adequate resources to retire, a larger percentage of adults over 65 are working now than before the recession.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Maryland employers made up most of April's lost ground with a gain of 4,600 jobs in May, but the state's unemployment rate still rose to 6.7 percent, the U.S. Department of Labor said Friday. The jobless rate was 6.5 percent in April. Maryland was one of 17 states to see its unemployment rate rise. But it was among 33 states, plus the District of Columbia, with a gain in jobs. Many of Maryland's large sectors expanded employment in May, according to the federal estimates — which are preliminary and adjusted to try to account for seasonal fluctuations in hiring and layoffs.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Summer's arrival brought Maryland a slight uptick in unemployment despite a larger-than-normal employment bump in June, but it also contributed to significantly more job losses in May than previously thought, state labor officials said Friday. Maryland employers added 7,700 jobs last month, with the strongest gains in tourism-related industries, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. But the bureau revised May's losses to 6,800 jobs, substantially worse than preliminary estimates of 1,300 fewer jobs.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1994
Maryland's unemployment rate jumped sharply in January, as layoffs from Christmas-season jobs and the cold winter weather pushed the state jobless rate to 6.4 percent from December's 5.8 percent.State officials said unemployment rose by 16,430 people in January, bringing the total out of work in Maryland to more than 170,000 workers.But a bright side in the unemployment rate, they said, is that fewer workers than normal left the work force after giving up hope of finding a job soon. When people stop looking for work, they are no longer counted in the unemployment figures.
NEWS
By David Conn | February 2, 1991
Unemployment in Maryland rose sharply for the second straight month in December, to 6.0 percent from 5.3 percent in November.Unemployment in Baltimore reached almost 10 percent in December, fueled largely by layoffs in auto manufacturing, according to state officials, who said those layoffs boosted the state figures as well.Despite Maryland's reputation for being recession-resistant, the December figures, which are seasonally unadjusted, put the state ahead of the comparable U.S. rate of 5.9 percent for the first time in almost 10 years.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
Carroll and Queen Anne's were the only counties in the Baltimore area where the unemployment rate fell in August, according to data released Friday by the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.In Carroll, unemployment declined significantly, from 6.1 percent July to 5.3 percent in August, the most recent month for which figures are available.The number of Carroll residents working or seeking work fell to 67,458 in August from 68,333 in July, and the number of people filing for unemployment insurance fell from 4,190 in July to 3,556 in August.
NEWS
November 7, 1992
Maryland's unemployment rate inched up to 6.7 percent in September, from 6.6 percent in August.Officials of the state Department of Economic and Employment Development said the increase was caused by a 2 percent seasonal drop in total employment, which fell to 2.45 million in September, from 2.5 million in August.But the drop did not cause a corresponding increase in the unemployment rate because many workers, such as students with summer jobs, did not stay in the work force.In fact, the number of people counted as unemployed actually fell slightly by 0.2 percent, to 175,078, from 175,475.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
Numbers released by the state Friday show only one more person was unemployed in the county in February than in January.Carroll's jobless rate held steady in February at 8.5 percent, but still was higher than state and national levels, the Department of Economic and Employment Development reported.On the positive side, the county was the only jurisdiction in themetropolitan Baltimore area where unemployment did not increase, DEED said.Carroll's jobless rate, however, is the highest since January 1984, when unemployment was 8.9 percent, said Theodora Stephen, manager of the DEED office in Westminster.
NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | May 9, 1992
Unemployment in Maryland fell slightly for the first time in six months as higher seasonal employment in government and in the services and trade industries reduced the March jobless rate to 7.4 percent from 7.5 percent the month before, the state reported yesterday.Most counties' jobless rates fell during the month, but Baltimore unemployment remained at February's 10.6 percent rate, revised downward from the 10.8 percent initially reported, the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development said.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 6.3 percent in April from 6.7 percent in March, the lowest it has been since September 2008, when it was 6.1 percent. However , The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not count people who have given up looking for work as unemployed. There are still more than 92 million Americans who remain out of the work force. The bureau noted that the civilian labor force dropped by 806,000 last month, following an increase of 503,000 in March. The number of Americans who are not in the work force rose in April to over 92.5 million, nearly 1 million more than in the previous month, when 91.6 million were not in the labor force, including an aging population that is continuing to head into retirement.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
In Gov. Martin O'Malley's "Better Choices, Better Results" tour he once again blatantly misleads Marylanders about job growth ("O'Malley kicks off fall speaking tour," Aug. 29). He claims Maryland has made up 94 percent of the jobs lost during the recession. In January 2007, Maryland's unemployment rate was 3.6 percent with 108,096 people unemployed in the state. As of July of this year, Maryland's jobless rate was 7.1 percent with 218,741 people now unemployed. How did Maryland make up 94 percent of the jobs lost during the recession with numbers like this?
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
For the second straight month, Maryland added jobs but saw its unemployment rate go up. The state's jobless rate rose to 7 percent in June from 6.7 percent in May, the U.S. Department of Labor said Thursday. Unemployment also increased slightly from 6.9 percent in June 2012. Maryland gained 4,300 jobs last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics survey showed. The federal estimates are preliminary and adjusted to account for seasonal changes in hiring and layoffs. Maryland, with a labor force of 3.1 million people, was among 28 states with higher unemployment in June.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Maryland employers turned in a third consecutive month of job growth with a large gain of 14,000 positions in October, the federal government said Tuesday — a much better trend after five months of losses. The state's unemployment rate improved to 6.7 percent in October as a result of the expansion, down from 6.9 percent in September and 7.1 percent in August, the U.S. Department of Labor said. James Bohnaker, an associate economist with Moody's Analytics, called the October jobs performance "a huge gain," one that comes on the heels of an also substantial 9,500-job increase in September.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
A five-month stretch of job losses in Maryland ended in August with a small gain, too meager to keep the state's unemployment rate from ticking up to 7.1 percent, the U.S. Department of Labor said Friday. And some economists said even the apparent job increase in August looks suspect. The labor agency, which measured losses in most major industries and both federal and state employment that month, estimated a 1,400-job gain overall as a result of a 6,700-job increase in local government.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
- Arguing that he needs more time to fix the nation's sluggish economy, President Barack Obama formally accepted his party's nomination for a second term Thursday while stressing that voters will face a stark choice in November that could affect their lives for decades to come. The Democratic incumbent laid out a series of goals for the economy - most of them familiar - and repeatedly said his policies would take middle-class families down a vastly different path than those of his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney.
NEWS
By David Conn | January 5, 1991
Maryland's unemployment rate leaped nearly a full percentage point in November to the highest level in almost six years, the state reported yesterday in the clearest indication that Maryland is suffering from the effects of the nation's first recession in eight years.The November jobless rate climbed to 5.3 percent from 4.5 percent, where it had remained for four months. It was the highest unemployment rate since January 1985 when unemployment reached 5.5 percent, said Pat Arnold, director of the Office of Labor Market Analysis and Information at the state Department of Economic and Employment Development.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In the clearest sign yet that the economy is cooling off, the government reported yesterday that job growth was surprisingly weak in January and that unemployment rose to 5.7 percent.For all practical purposes, the three-tenths of a point rise in the jobless rate last month was the first increase in unemployment in two and a half years. There was an artificial jump, which made comparisons invalid, when a new method of computing the jobless rate was introduced at the beginning of 1994.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Maryland's unemployment rate in January fell to the lowest level in three years, reflecting an improving economy that spurred the state's employers to add 5,000 jobs during the month, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday. The state's jobless rate dropped to 6.5 percent, nearly 2 percentage points lower than the 8.3 percent national average, preliminary figures for January indicate. It is the fifth straight month that Maryland added jobs and saw an improving jobless rate.
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