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BUSINESS
November 26, 2009
WASHINGTON - In a hopeful sign for the economy, the number of newly laid-off workers filing claims for unemployment benefits fell below 500,000 last week for the first time since January. Consumer spending also picked up in October, and new-home sales hit their highest point in more than a year. Combined, the news suggested that the economy should be able to sustain at least a modest rebound. The number of people filing first-time claims for jobless aid fell by 35,000 to 466,000, the Labor Department said Wednesday.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 29, 2014
The Labor Department is expected to report this week that the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent. But that hardly tells the story. The jobless rate may be down from its recession peak of 10 percent, but much of this results from adults - discouraged by the lack of decent job openings - having given up altogether. They are neither employed nor looking for work. Only about half of the drop in the adult participation rate may be attributed to the Baby Boom generation reaching retirement age. Lacking adequate resources to retire, a larger percentage of adults over 65 are working now than before the recession.
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BUSINESS
By Clement Tan and Tribune Washington Bureau | April 6, 2010
Even as unemployment benefits expired Monday for tens of thousands of jobless workers, Democrats and Republicans renewed their haggling over whether to vote for an extension when Congress returns from its spring break next week. In the latest round of skirmishing, Senate Democrats rejected Republican charges that they had backed away from a GOP proposal to give quick approval to a one-week extension that would be paid for with budget offsets. "There were a lot of conversations going on and things were moving very quickly, but no deals were made," said Jim Manley, a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Summer's arrival brought Maryland a slight uptick in unemployment despite a larger-than-normal employment bump in June, but it also contributed to significantly more job losses in May than previously thought, state labor officials said Friday. Maryland employers added 7,700 jobs last month, with the strongest gains in tourism-related industries, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. But the bureau revised May's losses to 6,800 jobs, substantially worse than preliminary estimates of 1,300 fewer jobs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella | January 23, 2010
The number of employed Maryland residents has fallen so sharply that it's hit a low not seen in nearly a decade. Last month, 2.7 million adults in the state had jobs - about 135,000 fewer than the year before, according to newly released U.S. Labor Department estimates. Not since November 2001 have so few Marylanders been employed, and the decline happened even as the overall population grew. The economic downshifting has been rapid, overtaxing the state's unemployment benefits fund and making job seekers re-evaluate whether it's even worth looking.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | April 19, 1992
To measure the U.S. unemployment rate, the Census Bureau periodically selects 60,000 households, chosen to represent different age, racial and income groups reflecting the population.A participating household is surveyed for four consecutive months, dropped for eight, then returned for a final four months.Selected households are notified by mail. Initial interviews are done in person and later ones by phone. They last 10 minutes.Questions involve age, sex, race, occupation, industry of employment, number of hours worked and whether unemployed workers quit or were fired.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1995
Maryland's unemployment rate stayed at 4.9 percent in April, after adjustments for seasonal hiring variations, state officials said yesterday.The proportion of jobless workers here is substantially less than in the country at large. The U.S. unemployment rate is 5.7 percent.One economist said the economic slowdown that appears imminent nationally doesn't seem quite so close to Maryland."Maryland's future for the first time in quite a while looks to be a little brighter than the country as a whole," said Michael Conte, head of the Regional Economic Studies Program at the University of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1995
Maryland's unemployment rate barely changed in May, inching up to a seasonally adjusted 5.0 percent from 4.9 percent in April, but still a half-point less than the national rate of 5.5 percent, state officials said yesterday.Maryland ended 1994 with a seasonally adjusted jobless rate of 4.7 percent. Analysts expect little change in state unemployment until next year, when federal budget cuts could put more people out of work."For the balance of the year, I think it'll be just about where it is now," said Robert Sweet, chief economist for First National Bank of Maryland.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | June 9, 1991
For the second straight month, Carroll's unemployment rate decreased, falling 1.1 percentage points in April, state figures show.The county's jobless rate for April -- the latest month for which figuresare available -- was 5.5 percent, down from 6.6 percent in March, according to statistics released Friday by the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
Carroll's jobless rate rose from 4.7 percent in October to 5.4 percent in November, throwing almost 500 more people into unemployment lines.Carroll joined every other Maryland county in experiencing a rise in unemployment, according to November figures released Friday bythe state Department of Economic and Employment Development.In Carroll, 3,481 people were unemployed, up from 2,987 in October.The county's civilian labor force, which includes people with jobs and those actively seeking work, increased by 274 people, from 63,918 in October to 64,192 in November.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 6.3 percent in April from 6.7 percent in March, the lowest it has been since September 2008, when it was 6.1 percent. However , The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not count people who have given up looking for work as unemployed. There are still more than 92 million Americans who remain out of the work force. The bureau noted that the civilian labor force dropped by 806,000 last month, following an increase of 503,000 in March. The number of Americans who are not in the work force rose in April to over 92.5 million, nearly 1 million more than in the previous month, when 91.6 million were not in the labor force, including an aging population that is continuing to head into retirement.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
Senate Republicans blinked this week on the issue of unemployment benefits, but you can bet that their House counterparts won't be so easily swayed by compassion. At least that's what Democrats are counting on. After legislation to resume long-term unemployment insurance benefits cleared a procedural hurdle on a 60-37 vote on Tuesday, House Speaker John Boehner announced that he'll only consider the measure if there are off-setting cuts in spending and the legislation "includes something to help put people back to work.
NEWS
January 6, 2014
Maryland is going to allow drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants ( "Thousands of immigrants seek drivers licenses," Dec. 31). As one said in the article, "Now I can get a car and drive to work. " Last week, long-term unemployment compensation was ending. Why are Americans having trouble finding work and undocumented immigrants are finding jobs paying enough to afford living expenses and a car? Who are our elected officials representing? Lenny Magsamen, Nottingham - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
At first glance, it would be tempting to condemn the bipartisan budget agreement announced late Tuesday by Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Patty Murray, if only because it asks further sacrifice of the unemployed and of federal workers . Those are hardly the two groups on whose backs the rollback of certain untenable sequestration cuts should be made. Extending unemployment benefits at a time of high unemployment used to be a given in this country no matter one's political leanings. But now it appears that there's no touching the hearts of Congressional Scrooges this year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
When Toni Coleman walked into Career Connections in Baltimore's Park Heights a month ago, she saw the rows of computers and training classrooms she'd expected of a new employment center. But Coleman, who's struggled for about a year to find work, said she hadn't expected the personal attention that helped her not only polish an outdated resume and ferret out job possibilities but regain some confidence. A volunteer at the center, run by St. Vincent de Paul of Baltimore, sat down with her over several days to rewrite her resume and point her to some promising leads.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
For the second straight month, Maryland added jobs but saw its unemployment rate go up. The state's jobless rate rose to 7 percent in June from 6.7 percent in May, the U.S. Department of Labor said Thursday. Unemployment also increased slightly from 6.9 percent in June 2012. Maryland gained 4,300 jobs last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics survey showed. The federal estimates are preliminary and adjusted to account for seasonal changes in hiring and layoffs. Maryland, with a labor force of 3.1 million people, was among 28 states with higher unemployment in June.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
Diane Massey hates the reason her office was given more federal money to operate next year: More county residents are unemployed."I hope people begin to realize it's not just their neighbor's problem," said the head of the county's job training office. "I could be next. You could be next. No one's job is secure."The county's portion of the federal grant to help the unemployed will more than triple for fiscal 1993, which begins July 1.The county will receive $329,599; this year, it received $100,000, said Massey.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | July 26, 1992
New York. -- The new emergency unemployment compensation law, like the one before it, both gives and takes away. It gives up to 26 more weeks of jobless pay to certain people who are out of work. And to finance those extended benefits, it takes money away from the rest of us.As dictated by the budget agreement of 1990, all new spending has to be offset -- on paper, at least -- by higher tax collections, to remind us that government benefits cost real money.If you're unemployed, take careful note of exactly who qualifies for emergency aid. You get it if you've exhausted your basic state benefits and haven't already had a run of extended unemployment pay. Barbara Farmer, director of the office of program management for the federal Unemployment Insurance Service, says that unemployment offices are getting calls from people who previously got extended benefits, hoping to qualify again.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
The Sun's characterization of the recent wave of gun violence is inaccurate in referring it as having occurred "in Baltimore City" ("In face of violence, hope that city can come together," July 9). No one has been shot in Homeland, Guilford, Roland Park, Mount Washington, Federal Hill, Little Italy, Canton, Lower Fells Point or any of the other "better" neighborhoods that make up the city. According to the addresses published in The Sun, all the victims have been residents of two areas in the city, one on the east side, the other on the west, that are characterized by extreme poverty, high unemployment, mediocre schools, drug usage, gang activity and broken families.
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