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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
Diane Massey hates the reason her office was given more federal money to operate next year: More county residents are unemployed."I hope people begin to realize it's not just their neighbor's problem," said the head of the county's job training office. "I could be next. You could be next. No one's job is secure."The county's portion of the federal grant to help the unemployed will more than triple for fiscal 1993, which begins July 1.The county will receive $329,599; this year, it received $100,000, said Massey.
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NEWS
September 7, 1998
HERE'S something on which labor and industry can agree: America needs to bolster its work-force skills.This year, Congress passed a bipartisan bill to help states improve job training. The Workforce Investment Act, pushed by President Clinton and earlier by former Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich, should help both sides in the years to come.Businesses certainly benefit from training programs; they need employees who are equipped to handle increasingly technical tasks that require more than a 12th-grade education.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | February 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is drafting legislation that would make radical changes in the nation's labor policy, junking the current unemployment insurance system and an array of job training programs in favor of new "One-Stop Career Centers" designed to match skills and training with the needs of competitive U.S. industries.The Workforce Security Act of 1994 is in the final drafting stages and scheduled to be introduced in Congress later this month. A Jan. 19 outline of the plan, obtained by the Globe, contains the details of an ambitious initiative that seeks to transform the lives of out-of-work Americans, and may gore some powerful bureaucracies and interest groups.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | June 26, 2007
Maryland's manufacturing industry continued to shrink over the past year, shedding 3,856 jobs and 114 manufacturers during the 12 months ended in May 2006, according to a company that tracks its comings and goings. Many of the job losses can be attributed to new technology and outsourcing, said Tom Dubin, president of Evanston, Ill.-based Manufacturers' News Inc., which has conducted an annual survey of the industry since 1912. "Manufacturing output is as high as ever," Dubin said. "Companies are leaner and meaner these days."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
More than 200 Anne Arundel County residents have used services at the county's newest career center since it began operating less than two months ago, county officials said Wednesday. Kirkland J. Murray, president and CEO of the Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp., said about two-thirds of those job seekers have found employment or been referred to job training programs. The center, Murray said at an open house Wednesday morning, is needed as the county, like communities everywhere, grapples with the recession.
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- More than 1,000 federal workers in Maryland who lose their jobs in the downsizing of government will have access to job training and counseling under a federal grant announced yesterday.The $4.6 million Labor Department grant to Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia is expected to serve about 4,000 federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington area who are expected to lose their jobs. About 1,400 federal workers in the Washington area have been laid off since October.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010
Federal, private funds awarded for green job training The U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday it has awarded $4.6 million for "green" job training to dislocated workers and others in Baltimore and Prince George's counties. The grant recipient, H-CAP Inc., will provide training to prepare job seekers and entry-level environmental services for "new and emerging green occupations" in the health care industry, the department said. The grant also will cover workers in California, New York, Washington and the District of Columbia.
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jill Zuckman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 10, 2004
Every day this week, Sen. John Kerry has tried to talk to voters about creating jobs and bolstering the economy as he campaigns for president. And every day, Kerry has found himself drawn inexorably into questions of foreign policy and critiques of President Bush's handling of the war in Iraq. Yesterday was no exception as Kerry, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, sought to emphasize job creation during a visit to the Greater West Town Community Development Project with Democratic Sen. Richard J. Durbin of Illinois and state Sen. Barak Obama, the Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
The nine candidates vying to be Annapolis' next mayor discussed public housing issues ranging from funding to revitalization and social services at a recent forum hosted by the Housing Authority of Annapolis. The seven Democrats, one Republican and one independent spoke mostly in broad terms of improving communication and collaboration between public housing residents and city government and creating opportunity for residents. Housing Commissioner Michael Jackson posed perhaps the most controversial question of the forum, asking candidates if there should be a time limit on families living in the city's public housing, which is often home to generations of families.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 13, 1998
Eight years ago after her youngest child started school, Robin Collins, 41, decided she wanted to help her husband with the family expenses. But the Catonsville mother of five had not worked in years -- and had no high school diploma.She got a hand from Catonsville Community College in the form of Project Second Start, a program that since 1981 has helped about 300 people a year with job training, schooling and counseling."I knew I needed help in getting my diploma and then getting into school, but I wasn't divorced or alone, I just wanted to help my family and receive an education," said Collins, who has since graduated from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and now is a registered diagnostic medical sonographer.
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