Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJob Training
IN THE NEWS

Job Training

NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
Until recently, Antonnette Okunola was couch surfing with friends or sleeping in her car. She had lost her job and left her mother's home because of their strained relationship. She quickly became one of the hundreds of young adults in Baltimore who do not have a regular place to live. The 24-year-old woman works two part-time jobs now and last week moved into her own furnished apartment in Park Heights at Restoration Gardens, the first housing project in Maryland dedicated to homeless youths.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Boston Globe | February 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is drafting legislation that would make radical changes in the nation's labor policy, junking the current unemployment insurance system and an array of job training programs in favor of new "One-Stop Career Centers" designed to match skills and training with the needs of competitive U.S. industries.The Workforce Security Act of 1994 is in the final drafting stages and scheduled to be introduced in Congress later this month. A Jan. 19 outline of the plan, obtained by the Globe, contains the details of an ambitious initiative that seeks to transform the lives of out-of-work Americans, and may gore some powerful bureaucracies and interest groups.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010
Federal, private funds awarded for green job training The U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday it has awarded $4.6 million for "green" job training to dislocated workers and others in Baltimore and Prince George's counties. The grant recipient, H-CAP Inc., will provide training to prepare job seekers and entry-level environmental services for "new and emerging green occupations" in the health care industry, the department said. The grant also will cover workers in California, New York, Washington and the District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | June 26, 2007
Maryland's manufacturing industry continued to shrink over the past year, shedding 3,856 jobs and 114 manufacturers during the 12 months ended in May 2006, according to a company that tracks its comings and goings. Many of the job losses can be attributed to new technology and outsourcing, said Tom Dubin, president of Evanston, Ill.-based Manufacturers' News Inc., which has conducted an annual survey of the industry since 1912. "Manufacturing output is as high as ever," Dubin said. "Companies are leaner and meaner these days."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
More than 200 Anne Arundel County residents have used services at the county's newest career center since it began operating less than two months ago, county officials said Wednesday. Kirkland J. Murray, president and CEO of the Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp., said about two-thirds of those job seekers have found employment or been referred to job training programs. The center, Murray said at an open house Wednesday morning, is needed as the county, like communities everywhere, grapples with the recession.
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- More than 1,000 federal workers in Maryland who lose their jobs in the downsizing of government will have access to job training and counseling under a federal grant announced yesterday.The $4.6 million Labor Department grant to Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia is expected to serve about 4,000 federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington area who are expected to lose their jobs. About 1,400 federal workers in the Washington area have been laid off since October.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Paul's Place began as a soup kitchen in the basement of a Southwest Baltimore church 30 years ago. It has expanded into a community outreach center that serves more than 75,000 hot lunches a year and offers more than 20 programs, including job training, housing assistance, computer classes, and family workshops. "We help more than 80,000 people annually," said William J. McLennan, executive director since 2002. He marked the 30th anniversary Thursday with a large decorated sheet cake, that, given the number of lunch guests at the center, disappeared in minutes.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Any reduction in recidivism rates is good news ( "Under Maynard, prisons have crises, but fewer repeat offenders," Aug. 10). People are less likely to return to prison if they have jobs, a safe place to live, and the will to succeed. Children are reunited with parents, and communities become stronger when there is less criminal activity. Achieving this kind of success is not easy. It requires a serious commitment from the person who was formerly incarcerated as well as state and local entities, plus the knowledge base of the nonprofit and for-profit sectors.
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jill Zuckman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 10, 2004
Every day this week, Sen. John Kerry has tried to talk to voters about creating jobs and bolstering the economy as he campaigns for president. And every day, Kerry has found himself drawn inexorably into questions of foreign policy and critiques of President Bush's handling of the war in Iraq. Yesterday was no exception as Kerry, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, sought to emphasize job creation during a visit to the Greater West Town Community Development Project with Democratic Sen. Richard J. Durbin of Illinois and state Sen. Barak Obama, the Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | July 26, 2009
The nine candidates vying to be Annapolis' next mayor discussed public housing issues ranging from funding to revitalization and social services at a recent forum hosted by the Housing Authority of Annapolis. The seven Democrats, one Republican and one independent spoke mostly in broad terms of improving communication and collaboration between public housing residents and city government and creating opportunity for residents. Housing Commissioner Michael Jackson posed perhaps the most controversial question of the forum, asking candidates if there should be a time limit on families living in the city's public housing, which is often home to generations of families.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.