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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
Diane Massey hates the reason her office was given more federal money to operate next year: More county residents are unemployed."I hope people begin to realize it's not just their neighbor's problem," said the head of the county's job training office. "I could be next. You could be next. No one's job is secure."The county's portion of the federal grant to help the unemployed will more than triple for fiscal 1993, which begins July 1.The county will receive $329,599; this year, it received $100,000, said Massey.
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NEWS
September 7, 1998
HERE'S something on which labor and industry can agree: America needs to bolster its work-force skills.This year, Congress passed a bipartisan bill to help states improve job training. The Workforce Investment Act, pushed by President Clinton and earlier by former Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich, should help both sides in the years to come.Businesses certainly benefit from training programs; they need employees who are equipped to handle increasingly technical tasks that require more than a 12th-grade education.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Olivia Griffin gets to her job at Johns Hopkins Hospital an hour early each work day just to make sure she isn't late. It's not an easy feat for the 25-year-old mother of two who relies on the bus and subway for transportation from her West Baltimore home to the East Baltimore campus. But she doesn't mind because she loves her work and hopes to spend her career in health care at Hopkins. "I had training as a medical assistant but I couldn't find a job opportunity," said Griffin, who began work in patient transportation in October but plans on becoming a registered nurse.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
Baltimore County will begin giving priority to veterans when making local government hiring decisions, officials announced Tuesday, a policy focused particularly on those returning from conflicts overseas. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz announced the decision at the National Guard's Gen. Harry C. Ruhl Armory in Towson, surrounded by uniformed soldiers and yellow ribbons. "We want to make the return home for these men and women who have fought so valiantly as easy and successful as possible," Kamenetz said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2011
Maryland has 210,000 unemployed residents searching for work. Maryland employers have 70,000 job openings they're trying to fill. The unemployment rate would drop overnight, state officials say, if many of the jobless people had the skills needed to fill those empty positions. Unfortunately, it's not working out nearly that neatly. Economic shifts — some potentially temporary, some permanent — have stranded an increasing number of unemployed workers in job limbo because their skills don't match up with employer demand.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010
Federal, private funds awarded for green job training The U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday it has awarded $4.6 million for "green" job training to dislocated workers and others in Baltimore and Prince George's counties. The grant recipient, H-CAP Inc., will provide training to prepare job seekers and entry-level environmental services for "new and emerging green occupations" in the health care industry, the department said. The grant also will cover workers in California, New York, Washington and the District of Columbia.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | February 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is drafting legislation that would make radical changes in the nation's labor policy, junking the current unemployment insurance system and an array of job training programs in favor of new "One-Stop Career Centers" designed to match skills and training with the needs of competitive U.S. industries.The Workforce Security Act of 1994 is in the final drafting stages and scheduled to be introduced in Congress later this month. A Jan. 19 outline of the plan, obtained by the Globe, contains the details of an ambitious initiative that seeks to transform the lives of out-of-work Americans, and may gore some powerful bureaucracies and interest groups.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | June 26, 2007
Maryland's manufacturing industry continued to shrink over the past year, shedding 3,856 jobs and 114 manufacturers during the 12 months ended in May 2006, according to a company that tracks its comings and goings. Many of the job losses can be attributed to new technology and outsourcing, said Tom Dubin, president of Evanston, Ill.-based Manufacturers' News Inc., which has conducted an annual survey of the industry since 1912. "Manufacturing output is as high as ever," Dubin said. "Companies are leaner and meaner these days."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
More than 200 Anne Arundel County residents have used services at the county's newest career center since it began operating less than two months ago, county officials said Wednesday. Kirkland J. Murray, president and CEO of the Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp., said about two-thirds of those job seekers have found employment or been referred to job training programs. The center, Murray said at an open house Wednesday morning, is needed as the county, like communities everywhere, grapples with the recession.
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- More than 1,000 federal workers in Maryland who lose their jobs in the downsizing of government will have access to job training and counseling under a federal grant announced yesterday.The $4.6 million Labor Department grant to Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia is expected to serve about 4,000 federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington area who are expected to lose their jobs. About 1,400 federal workers in the Washington area have been laid off since October.
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