Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJob Training
IN THE NEWS

Job Training

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Finally, job training is in the headlines. And it is being lauded and maligned. The federal government has devoted millions to training grants and other training activities. But why invest scarce public funds in job training when there are no jobs? Let's get the facts straight. Training doesn't create jobs, but it does position individuals and communities for economic recovery, especially when a person is retrained for a new job with new skills. When training is tied to current and future employment needs, that training prepares workers with the skills that will equip them to be successful in their job search.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
A Baltimore nonprofit AmeriCorps program will receive $200,000 in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant money to train 72 city residents for careers in environmental cleanup work. The nonprofit, Civic Works, was one of 18 groups nationwide that were awarded a combined $3.6 million through the agency's Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program. "This funding will expand the workforce needed in Baltimore to reuse and revitalize contaminated properties," EPA mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin said in a statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A program that offers job training to Baltimoreans 55 and older is expanding. The Senior Community Service Employment Program offers paid training slots at government agencies and nonprofits to eligible city residents. City and state officials are expected to discuss an expansion of the program at a news conference Monday. Participants are paid minimum wage for 20 hours a week. The city has room for about 30 more individuals, although additional slots may become available, officials said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has declined to fund a proposed East Baltimore job-training program backed by an influential community group, sparking a war of words over whether City Hall is doing enough to help the unemployed. The interfaith coalition Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development says its leaders have a proposal to provide 50 members of the Oliver neighborhood with jobs and want $594,000 in funding over three years from the Rawlings-Blake administration. The program would target ex-offenders and others chronically unemployed.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
The Open Society Institute of Baltimore, a foundation funded by billionaire philanthropist George Soros, is giving $1.5 million to four city nonprofits for job training for low-income residents. The award will be accompanied by another $1.5 million of state and federal funds. The $3 million in funding will help provide job training and placement services to 141 people with criminal convictions who otherwise would be unable to find work. The four nonprofits receiving funding are the Center for Urban Families, Civic Works, Group Ministries and the Job Opportunities Task Force.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Cynthia MacKinnon says she is working at her dream job, thanks to training and encouragement she received at the Caroline Center in East Baltimore. The nonprofit center, run by the School Sisters of Notre Dame, a Roman Catholic religious order, celebrates its 15th anniversary Thursday with a salute to MacKinnon and others who acquired education and job skills within its walls. "We are flourishing," said Sister Patricia McLaughlin, the center's executive director. "Meeting all these wonderful women and watching them blossom has been a blessing to us. " More than 1,500 women have completed the center's employment readiness programs since it opened its doors on Somerset Street.
EXPLORE
By John Culleton | July 21, 2011
Often, the best ideas for a column come from readers. One reader recently objected to a column about Republicans vs. Democrats and said the real issue for voters is, instead, the people vs. elected officials of both parties. He wanted to throw all the rascals out. I think he failed to note that all of those rascal officials were chosen by the people not so long ago. All of our local officials, all of our Carroll County delegation and our representatives to Congress are Republicans.
NEWS
August 28, 1992
President Bush and Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton advocate "workfare" -- requiring welfare recipients to get education or job training if they want to receive benefits. But the story of the Human Development Institute, a small job-training company located in Baltimore, shows the difficulty of implementing such a policy under Washington's conflicting regulatory structure.HDI did what it promised -- it made workers out of welfare mothers. Seventy-five percent of the 1,500 women who passed through HDI's training sessions found jobs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2013
Even as the manufacturing industry sheds jobs overall, a number of firms in Maryland want to hire - and aren't having an easy time of it. That's what the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership heard when the nonprofit talked to 40 employers this year. Most of the entry-level people the firms bring on don't work out, in part because it can be a culture shock to take a job in manufacturing for the first time, said Brian Sweeney, executive director of the manufacturing-assistance organization.
NEWS
March 14, 1991
The Baltimore City Life Museums is offering a free job-training program for economically disadvantaged adults ages 55 and up who are interested in museum work.Classes meet 16 hours a week, March 14 to May 16.Qualified applicants train to fill jobs as tour guides, word processors, gift shop salespeople and other museum positions. Travel stipends and job-placement counseling are provided. Call
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2013
Even as the manufacturing industry sheds jobs overall, a number of firms in Maryland want to hire - and aren't having an easy time of it. That's what the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership heard when the nonprofit talked to 40 employers this year. Most of the entry-level people the firms bring on don't work out, in part because it can be a culture shock to take a job in manufacturing for the first time, said Brian Sweeney, executive director of the manufacturing-assistance organization.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Olivia Griffin gets to her job at Johns Hopkins Hospital an hour early each work day just to make sure she isn't late. It's not an easy feat for the 25-year-old mother of two who relies on the bus and subway for transportation from her West Baltimore home to the East Baltimore campus. But she doesn't mind because she loves her work and hopes to spend her career in health care at Hopkins. "I had training as a medical assistant but I couldn't find a job opportunity," said Griffin, who began work in patient transportation in October but plans on becoming a registered nurse.
NEWS
By Sarah Hainesworth, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Maryland inmates on work duty have long been given a highly visible job: picking up garbage along the state's highways. Though the work has helped keep shoulders and medians free of litter, corrections officials acknowledge it doesn't do much to prepare prisoners for life on the outside. So the state has been trying to detail inmates to public service projects that offer job skills that might help them re-enter society. On Tuesday, state and local officials held a ribbon-cutting to celebrate one such project - the completion of more than 200 new or rebuilt handicapped-accessible curbs in Westminster.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A program that offers job training to Baltimoreans 55 and older is expanding. The Senior Community Service Employment Program offers paid training slots at government agencies and nonprofits to eligible city residents. City and state officials are expected to discuss an expansion of the program at a news conference Monday. Participants are paid minimum wage for 20 hours a week. The city has room for about 30 more individuals, although additional slots may become available, officials said.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Any reduction in recidivism rates is good news ( "Under Maynard, prisons have crises, but fewer repeat offenders," Aug. 10). People are less likely to return to prison if they have jobs, a safe place to live, and the will to succeed. Children are reunited with parents, and communities become stronger when there is less criminal activity. Achieving this kind of success is not easy. It requires a serious commitment from the person who was formerly incarcerated as well as state and local entities, plus the knowledge base of the nonprofit and for-profit sectors.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
In your article about the recent shake-up in the police department Commissioner Anthony Batts was quoted as saying: "When I got here, a lot of these people, I did not know their strengths, their weaknesses, their capabilities" ("18 Commanders promoted, other changes made as some on council voice concern," July 10). If Mr. Batts was so lacking in knowledge of the commanders of the Baltimore City Police Department, why did he decide to take the job? How much knowledge did he have of the Baltimore, and why did Baltimore hire a person who knew so little about the commanders of the city police department?
NEWS
By Lisa H. Lawson | August 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The most flagrant examples of wasteful government spending are federal and state job-training programs, hampered as they are by duplication, waste and conflicting regulations.The General Accounting Office estimates that the federal government oversees some 154 separate job-training programs, administered by more than a dozen different agencies.The cost to taxpayers is close to $25 billion a year, but that's not the only chapter in this story of waste.These bureaucratic job-training programs aim at achieving only minimum skill levels and continue to pump taxpayer dollars into training directed at yesterday's jobs, particularly low-skill management jobs.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
ELDERSBURG -- Judy Young is a confident, self-assured young woman of 27 with soft blond hair, friendly blue eyes and ready smile.She's also a single mother of 7-year-old twin sons, and a bank teller at Farmers and Merchants Bank in Hampstead.Two years ago, Ms. Young was a struggling young mother whose relationship had gone sour and who had no place to live. But with the help of Human Services Programs and the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), the native West Virginian is putting her life back together.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
A 60-year-old fire station in Mount Washington is getting a tune-up this week from a team of Maryland National Guard engineers as part of a new civic partnership aimed at benefiting the community while providing on-the-job training for deploying guardsmen. About a dozen members of the 244th Engineer Company, which draws recruits from Ocean City to Cumberland and is set to deploy to Afghanistan this fall, have been working since last week to strip and replace the aging building's kitchen, which city officials called the heart of the station.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
The grind of being an NFL nose guard is embraced by Ravens rookie Brandon Williams, a heavyweight defensive lineman accustomed to dirty work and life's hardships. Before emerging as a draft sleeper from Division II Missouri Southern, Williams spent last summer hauling and cleaning portable toilets. "Sometimes, you got a little poop on you," said Williams, the Ravens' third-round pick (94th overall). "Every time I was doing that, I said to myself, 'I gotta work harder, I'm not doing this the rest of my life.' It motivated me to get better.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.