Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJob Seekers
IN THE NEWS

Job Seekers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 12, 2010
Your recent article "Help's on the way with career center" (Aug. 12)," highlights a great tool to help residents of Baltimore County to connect to employment opportunities. During these difficult economic times, a greater number of Baltimore area residents have found themselves out of work, through no fault of their own. As local companies have downsized or simply closed their doors, their former employees need to access resources to re-enter the workforce. In particular, the county's Mobile Career Center can help jobseekers access occupational training programs that can give them the skills they need to compete for jobs in areas of our local economy that hold promise for future career options.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Contrary to Sun columnist Dan Rodricks ' view, the "ban-the-box" bill currently working its way through the Baltimore City Council is not just "feel good" legislation ( "'Ban the box' feels good but won't achieve much," March 22). Ban the box is a sensible and proven person-first approach to hiring that allows those at both ends of the hiring transaction to interact. Having a process or blanket policy that immediately disqualifies people with a criminal record is illegal.
Advertisement
EXPLORE
August 30, 2012
The Maryland Department of Labor Licensing and Regulation/DLLR is holding a Fort Meade Community Job Fair, Wednesday, Sept. 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Club Meade, 6600 Mapes Road, on Fort Meade. All job seekers, veterans and nonveterans, can meet prospective employers. Bring résumés and dress for success. Participants should arrive early, and anticipate lines at the installation's gate and at the job fair. Other sponsors of the job fair include Fort Meade Family, Morale, Welfare and Recreation; DLLR/Anne Arundel One Stop Career Centers; Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp.; Army Community Service; Navy Fleet and Family Support Center; and Army Career and Alumni Program.
NEWS
January 18, 2014
As I've followed the news about the scandal surrounding New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, I am probably not alone in being moved by one of the stories that emerged from the release of emails among his staff. A woman had complained to The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that her husband, who had been out of work for more than a year, was 40 minutes late to his first day at a new job because he was caught in the traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge. I wince thinking about that man watching the minutes tick by and knowing that his chances of making a positive impression on a long sought-after job were diminished.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Baltimore is opening four "community job hubs" to help residents looking for employment, the city said Wednesday. The hubs, intended to supplement the city's three one-stop career centers, will offer free courses on such topics as job search techniques and resume development. Residents can also get information on in-depth training, job fairs and other employment-related activities. The hubs, some open and some about to open, are at the Academy of Success Inc., 200 S. Franklintown Road; Govans Ecumenical Development Corp., 5502 York Road; My Brother's Keeper, 4207 Frederick Road, and Southern Community Action Center, 606 Cherry Hill Road.
NEWS
April 2, 2009
Thousands flocked to the 5th Regiment Armory in Baltimore for a job fair Monday that featured government and private employers but few real job offers. Here are a few participants' views: Emory Proctor, 24, a graduate of Hampton University with a degree in business administration, has a job but is open to a new opportunity: "It's easier to find a job when you have a job. ... Right now, [in] my current position, I do pretty well. As I said, I'm with the financial services division, so, I mean, the people that are trying to invest, I do OK, but it's so rocky and up and down that you never know."
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
At a time when employers receive hundreds of applications for a single job opening, a glowing reference could be the difference between standing out and sitting at home. Enter CareerExcuse.com, a website that promises to "act as your past employer" and provide you with a positive reference. "You provide us with your name, employment dates, ending salary and job titles, we do the rest!!" the site pledges. Of course it's never OK to lie, and doing so can backfire. But some workers are desperate in what is the worst job market in more than a generation.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
Robert Robinson wanted to be a security guard. Easter Morris tried becoming a cleaning lady. Kyla Whiting sought work at a handbag outlet store. All say they were denied jobs because their would-be employers learned that they had bad credit. In response to such stories, state lawmakers now are moving to limit the ability of businesses to run credit checks on job applicants. "A credit report should not be the measure by which people are judged in terms of whether they can do a good job or not," said Sen. Catherine E. Pugh.
NEWS
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE and MARIE G. MCINTYRE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 26, 2006
I have applied for many jobs, but no one calls me for an interview. For 10 years, I have worked in call centers for tech support and customer service. My resume has been professionally written, but I am not getting any bites at all. What am I to do? Because many call-center jobs are being outsourced overseas, you have a lot of competition. To get an interview, you have to stand out from the crowd. And to stand out, you need personal contacts and a first-class resume. After 10 years, you must know a lot people in your field.
NEWS
By Sara Oppenheim and Sara Oppenheim,Special to the Sun | April 30, 1995
More than 1,000 people brought their resumes to the Howard County Job Fair Friday, but many -- including some highly qualified candidates -- said that even at the fair they were having a hard time finding well-paid employment in their fields.And some who have been unemployed for more than a year fear that employers are passing them over for younger, less-qualified applicants willing to work for less money."The companies think the younger and the cheaper you can get them is better," said Anna Brus, 30, who has been looking for a customer service job since she was laid off from a sales job at The Mall in Columbia in August 1993.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2013
Even as the manufacturing industry sheds jobs overall, a number of firms in Maryland want to hire - and aren't having an easy time of it. That's what the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership heard when the nonprofit talked to 40 employers this year. Most of the entry-level people the firms bring on don't work out, in part because it can be a culture shock to take a job in manufacturing for the first time, said Brian Sweeney, executive director of the manufacturing-assistance organization.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp. is planning a month-long series of free workshops and networking events designed to help the county's unemployed residents find jobs. Of 60,000 available jobs in the Baltimore region, 11,000 are in Anne Arundel County, said Kirkland J. Murray, the group's president and CEO. The group operates one-stop and career connection centers in the county. Back-to-Work month, from April 2 to May 3, will help jobless residents develop skills to better compete in an improving job market, the group said.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
SKW Constructors plans to hire up to 100 people to construct concrete tubes and fans at the Sparrows Point Shipyard and Industrial park in Dundalk, according to Baltimore County economic development officials. Subcontractors are expected to hire additional people to work on the project, including carpenters, mechanics, surveyors and truck drivers, the county said. "This project is a huge boost in our efforts to bring new businesses and new jobs back to Sparrows Point," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Karen L. Sitnick's job is jobs — helping people find them. As director of the Mayor's Office of Employment Development in Baltimore, she oversees an effort that isn't simple, even in the best of times, as residents struggle to overcome education gaps and other challenges. The recession and slow recovery have tested job seekers and their helpers alike. Baltimore's unemployment rate is averaging about 10 percent this year, better than the 12 percent in 2010 but still far above prerecession levels.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Baltimore is opening four "community job hubs" to help residents looking for employment, the city said Wednesday. The hubs, intended to supplement the city's three one-stop career centers, will offer free courses on such topics as job search techniques and resume development. Residents can also get information on in-depth training, job fairs and other employment-related activities. The hubs, some open and some about to open, are at the Academy of Success Inc., 200 S. Franklintown Road; Govans Ecumenical Development Corp., 5502 York Road; My Brother's Keeper, 4207 Frederick Road, and Southern Community Action Center, 606 Cherry Hill Road.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Fort Meade's rapid growth in the past few years has made it the state's largest employer, but getting a foot in the door — or, rather, inside the guarded fence line — can be daunting. Many of the Army installation's 56,000 jobs require a security clearance. And though it's one base, Fort Meade contains 95 employers, including the National Security Agency and the Environmental Protection Agency. When local officials held an event last week to demystify Fort Meade hiring, 300 people showed up, armed with notebooks and resumes.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | December 13, 1992
Will Matricciani, owner of the Fence Fair on North Poin Boulevard, was preparing to lay off some workers when he noticed that builders were already scheduling spring fencing jobs.Business has been so bad that he'll still have to lay off some store workers for a couple of months this winter. But if builders maintain their schedules, business will rebound by April, Mr. Matricciani believes."I have to be optimistic," he explained. "Otherwise I'd put a bullet in my head."After two years of gloom, Maryland employers and job seekers are noticing a few signs of economic recovery, albeit tiny ones.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
Employment experts usually advise job seekers to dance around the question about their salary requirement. Giving a prospective employer a figure upfront could take you out of the running even before you land an interview. But some employers in competitive job markets are making it more difficult, if not impossible, for you to gracefully sidestep the salary question. They demand a figure by saying they won't consider you unless you include one in the cover letter. Now what do you do? "Put a smart number down," says Tim Besse, co-founder of Glassdoor.
NEWS
October 12, 2012
Sunday, Oct. 14 Festival The Department of Recreation and Parks' annual Arts and Music Festival concludes from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Quiet Waters Park, 600 Quiet Waters Park Road in Annapolis. The event features various exhibitors offering goods in leather, pottery, textiles and other media. There will also be food, demonstrations, musical performances and antique appraisals. Admission is $6 per car per day. Free parking. Information: 410-222-1777. Monday, Oct. 15 Political forum The American Association of University Women, the League of Women Voters and the Unitarian Universalist Legislative Ministry of Maryland are co-sponsoring a Congressional Candidates Forum from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Woods Memorial Presbyterian Church, 611 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
U.S. and state labor officials will cut the ribbon Thursday on a new workforce center for job seekers and employers. The Laurel Regional Workforce Center, intended to help people in Anne Arundel, Howard, Prince George's and Montgomery counties, will help workers with job searches and connect them to training. Businesses can get assistance finding employees. The center, at 312 Marshall Ave., will draw from a larger area than county workforce centers in an effort to make more connections in a region that has high levels of cross-commuting.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.