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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Earlier this year, Baltimore County promised job security through 2014 for members of three public employee unions, but county officials say they can't make the same guarantee for other labor groups. The Kamenetz administration is in talks with the Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees, the police union and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, whose contracts expire in June. Together, the unions represent about 4,300 employees, more than half the county's workforce.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Adjunct faculty members at the Maryland Institute College of Art voted to unionize this week, creating the first union representing part-time faculty members at any four-year college in the state. The MICA adjuncts began organizing in March amid dissatisfaction with what some lecturers called shaky job security and insufficient wages. Mailed-in ballots were tallied at the board's Baltimore office Tuesday by a representative of the National Labor Relations Board, with witnesses from MICA's administration and the part-time faculty committee observing the process.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 6, 2010
The police and sheriffs' unions in Baltimore County have agreed to a contract that will guarantee members their jobs for the next two years, but will eliminate cost-of-living adjustments and increase they amount they contribute to their pensions, County Executive James T. Smith Jr. said Tuesday. The firefighters' union and several others have reached similar agreements with the county subject to ratification by the rank and file, Smith said. "All the union leaders have signed off on the contracts and we are confident their members are in synch," said Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. Michael Day, president of the county firefighters' union local, said the agreement takes into account "the very difficult economic climate that exists in the nation and ensures that fire and EMS personnel will keep their jobs and that the people of Baltimore County will continue to be safe and secure, where they live, work and play."
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Members of the Baltimore County police union are scheduled to vote Wednesday and Thursday on a labor agreement that would increase their job security, but also raise pension contributions for future hires. The proposed agreement between Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 and the county would protect members through 2016 from being furloughed or laid off. Officers hired after July 1 would contribute 10 percent of their base pay to their pensions — more than current officers contribute.
SPORTS
August 31, 2012
Baltimore Sun reporters Jeff Barker and Don Markus and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland  sports. Is Randy Edsall on the hot seat? Jeff Barker: I'm going to preface my response by saying that this is not my opinion. Rather, it's  something I've spoken to the athletic department about because it's obviously an important subject and you don't want to just be guessing. The best answer right now is that Maryland says he's not on the hot seat.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Baltimore County school employees have reached a tentative agreement with the school system that would raise the contributions employees make to their health care plans over the next five years in exchange for guarantees that there will be no layoffs or furloughs for three years. Over the next five years, the county's contribution to their health care premiums would drop to 80 percent from 90 percent, which would bring school employees in line with other county workers. School employees who elect to join an HMO would pay less than those who choose the other plans.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | August 3, 2008
How would you measure job satisfaction? For employees in a new survey, job security is the most important aspect of satisfaction. The Society for Human Resource Management, which conducted the survey of 601 employees, says the answer underscores the uncertainty workers are feeling in a slumping economy in which experts differ on whether we're in a recession or not. With housing and credit markets in turmoil, the trade group says the economic climate is...
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | May 12, 2002
FORGET the lattes, massage therapists, foosball tables, rock-climbing walls. Today's college graduate is interested in something more traditional from an employer - job security. "Money is the No. 1 topic, but I would say job security has moved from completely off the map to No. 2," said Brian Krueger, president of CollegeGrad.com, an entry-level job site. "People ask, `Is it OK to ask about job security?'" "It's huge," agreed Adrienne Alberts, interim director of Johns Hopkins University's career center, adding that the top concern among students is landing a job followed by keeping it. "Students want to know they will be in a position they can count on," she said.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | April 10, 2006
CHICAGO -- French students and unions have been protesting for weeks over a law making it easier for companies to get rid of employees. Under the measure recently signed by President Jacques Chirac, companies may fire workers younger than 26 during their first two years on the job - for no reason whatsoever. The demonstrators think that's a bad idea, and they're right. Here's a better one: Let companies fire any workers of any age at any time for no reason at all. It may seem as though my proposal would be great for greedy corporations but lousy for ordinary workers.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Members of the Baltimore County police union are scheduled to vote Wednesday and Thursday on a labor agreement that would increase their job security, but also raise pension contributions for future hires. The proposed agreement between Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 and the county would protect members through 2016 from being furloughed or laid off. Officers hired after July 1 would contribute 10 percent of their base pay to their pensions — more than current officers contribute.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
With No. 9 Johns Hopkins' 14-5 dismantling of visiting Michigan on Saturday , Dave Pietramala joined some rare company. Pietrmala became only the sixth Division I coach to win 150 games at one school. Pietramala, who is 150-50 in 14 seasons with the Blue Jays, joined Delaware's Bob Shillinglaw (283 wins), Virginia's Dom Starsia (252), Notre Dame's Kevin Corrigan (242), Syracuse's John Desko (189) and Massachusetts' Greg Cannella (174). Asked about the achievement on Wednesday morning, Pietramala was self-deprecating, per usual.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Most of the federal workers calling financial planner Stephen Zelcer have an observation and a question. They're worried Congress will kick off a shutdown sequel in January - and they want to know what, financially speaking, they should do to protect themselves. "All the negotiations that we just saw were just a temporary Band-Aid and have to be readdressed again in 2014," said Zelcer, a federal employee benefits specialist with Rockville-based Wealth Strategies Group. "As a result of that, a lot of people are second-guessing the security of their job altogether.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | March 28, 2013
Five years ago, I thought I might have to leave Baltimore. Not because I wanted to but because I thought I needed to. It was 2008. Like many employers, Urbanite magazine, where I worked, was feeling the effects of the Great Recession, so I would soon have only half a job. The cut gave me a chance to rethink a few things. Just a few years earlier, I was at the London School of Economics sharing hallways with one of then-Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi's sons and the crown prince of Norway.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The economy is improving and so is employment, but workers' optimism about a comfortable retirement has fallen to a new low, according to the annual Retirement Confidence Survey released Tuesday. Just over half of workers say they are either very confident about their retirement prospects or somewhat so. But 28 percent - a record high - have no confidence while an additional 21 percent express pessimism about their retirement future. The survey by the Employment Benefit Research Institute gauged the outlook on retirement among 1,254 U.S. workers and retirees interviewed in January.
SPORTS
Sports Xchange | October 28, 2012
Randy Bernard is out as CEO of the IndyCar series after a special meeting of the board of directors of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Corporation on Sunday, radio station WIBC in Indianapolis reported. Bernard was in the third year of a five-year contract and will remain in an advisory capacity. Jeff Belskus, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway President and CEO, was named interim IndyCar CEO. "We are very grateful for the tireless effort that Randy has invested into learning, understanding and working to grow the IndyCar Series over the last three racing seasons," Belskus said in a statement released by IMS on Sunday.
SPORTS
August 31, 2012
Baltimore Sun reporters Jeff Barker and Don Markus and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland  sports. Is Randy Edsall on the hot seat? Jeff Barker: I'm going to preface my response by saying that this is not my opinion. Rather, it's  something I've spoken to the athletic department about because it's obviously an important subject and you don't want to just be guessing. The best answer right now is that Maryland says he's not on the hot seat.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2010
Baltimore County police officers and deputy sheriffs have agreed to forgo cost-of-living adjustments and pay more into their pensions in exchange for job security. Under contracts ratified by the unions that represent 2,000 employees in the police and sheriff's departments, members may not be laid off or furloughed at least through June 2012, officials said. They will receive previously scheduled increment and longevity increases, but not cost-of-living adjustments. The firefighters union and several others have reached similar agreements with the county, subject to ratification by their members, county officials said.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 26, 2002
USINSK, Russia - On the stage of the House of Culture, a 20-something couple in business attire raps to a karaoke beat, while a gang of other young professionals gyrates around them. "Lukoil is reliable and stable!" a blond oil specialist shouts into her microphone. "Lukoil has the biggest tanker fleet in Russia!" declares Dmitri Nikolayev, a mining engineer. "One hundred twenty million rubles went to social programs in the past year!" his partner proclaims. Not so long ago, these ambitious university graduates in this remote oil town on the edge of the Arctic Circle would have been singing the praises of the Communist Party during their holiday bash.
NEWS
May 22, 2012
Columnist Thomas Schaller makes a very solid argument about the relative ability of the government and free markets to get things done ("Government is flawed, but markets are too," May 15). His critics' arguments, however, fall flat. One reader wrote that competition in the private sector this leads to greater efficiency and better outcomes. But this argument fails to take into account the effect of monopolies and oligopolies on the supposed free market. Many industries are so expensive to get into that only a few players run the show (think of cable TV and energy)
SPORTS
Courtesy of Inside Lacrosse magazine | May 17, 2012
• On a Notre Dame men's lacrosse team where everyone contributes, Clarksville's Jim Marlatt has grabbed the spotlight. The River Hill grad had a career-high five-point day in the NCAA first-round win over Yale. But it's depth that has been the key: 19 different players have hit the back of the net for the Irish, who play Virginia on Sunday in the NCAA quarterfinals. "We're just looking for the opening guy and whoever that guys is at the end of the play is going to get the goal," said Marlatt, a 2012 Big East Conference first-team honoree.
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