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Job Satisfaction

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NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
Travelers gripe about having to remove shoes while going through airport security or undergoing full-body pat-downs. But imagine being the Transportation Security Administration screener who has to deal with thousands of grumpy passengers daily or must rummage through strangers' dirty underwear to look for items that could blow up a plane. It is not surprising that TSA employees rank among the federal workers who are least content with their jobs. Some of the most satisfied employees year-in, year-out work at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, according to the Partnership for Public Service, a nonprofit that encourages careers in government.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 7, 2014
My husband the sportswriter received an award last week from the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons for a meticulously reported story on the surgery that repaired Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson's devastating knee injury. Talk about tough judges. I was there to accept it for him because he was covering the Kentucky Derby, where the athletes have twice as many legs and not much chance of recovering from a serious joint injury. My husband writes a lot about sports injuries.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
After Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant melted down in 2011, Nathan Sanfilippo joined a team at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission charged with evaluating what went wrong and determining how to prevent a similar disaster in the United States. Developing a strategy for the country's safety and Japan's recovery is the sort of assignment that Sanfilippo says allows him to leave work at the end of the day feeling as if his contribution makes a difference. Sanfilippo and his colleagues at the Rockville-based agency rated their employer among the top federal agencies for job satisfaction in the annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey administered by the Office of Personnel Management.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Leadership, more than any other factor, shapes how federal employees view their workplaces, says Max Stier, president and CEO of the Partnership for Public Service. The Washington-based nonprofit, which encourages careers in public service, found effective leadership trumped type of work, agency mission or the economic climate for the greatest influence on job satisfaction this year in its annual "Best Places to Work in the Federal Government" report. The partnership ranks 371 federal agencies and offices and represents the views of 97 percent of the 2.1 million-person federal workforce.
NEWS
By Blanca Torres and Blanca Torres,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
While eating bagels at staff meetings, having drinks during happy hour or chatting during a baseball game, the staff at Nevins and Associates have become more than co-workers. The Hunt Valley-based public relations firm has 15 employees - including one who has been known to knit blankets for special occasions in fellow employees' lives: babies, weddings, birthdays. Staffers know about one another's lives and families. In September, most of the office plans to attend an employee's wedding.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | August 3, 2008
How would you measure job satisfaction? For employees in a new survey, job security is the most important aspect of satisfaction. The Society for Human Resource Management, which conducted the survey of 601 employees, says the answer underscores the uncertainty workers are feeling in a slumping economy in which experts differ on whether we're in a recession or not. With housing and credit markets in turmoil, the trade group says the economic climate is...
BUSINESS
By Barbara Rose and Barbara Rose,Chicago Tribune | May 2, 2007
The old saw "money can't buy happiness" apparently holds true when it comes to work. Highly paid professionals such as doctors and lawyers didn't make the cut when researchers set out to find the most satisfied workers. Clergy ranked tops in both job satisfaction and general happiness, according to the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. Physical therapists and firefighters were second- and third-ranked in job satisfaction, with more than three-quarters reporting being "very satisfied."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 14, 1995
I know why you want my job. You think it's because restaurant critics get paid to eat at all the best restaurants. But the real job satisfaction comes when the waitress tells you, after you've been waiting 45 minutes for your main course, that "somehow the check has been misplaced, the kitchen never got it" and could you tell her again what you wanted.Then she leaves without taking any of your dirty dishes, and she doesn't bring you the water you asked for, and your main courses arrive half an hour later.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | December 6, 2006
Bullying doesn't stop when you graduate from the playground. It happens more often than we think in the workplace. One study showed that 16 percent of U.S. employees are bullied at work, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute in Bellingham, Wash. The scientific study, published in 2000, took a random sampling of 1,100 people, according to the institute. Bullying cannot only affect productivity and increase turnover but can affect the emotional health of the targeted worker. Indeed, workers who've experienced bullying say it can feel like a battle, water torture or a nightmare, according to a recent study conducted by three researchers at Arizona State University in Tempe and the University of New Mexico.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Howard Community College, Anne Arundel Community College and University of Maryland, Baltimore County have been named among the best colleges in the nation at which to work, according to a study by the Chronicle of Higher Education. The three local schools were among 97 recognized, having earned a spot in at least one of 12 categories that the national publication used to determine an exceptional college workplace. The Chronicle, which released the results Monday in its third annual report, "The Academic Workplace," said that 43,000 employees (including 20,000 faculty members)
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
After Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant melted down in 2011, Nathan Sanfilippo joined a team at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission charged with evaluating what went wrong and determining how to prevent a similar disaster in the United States. Developing a strategy for the country's safety and Japan's recovery is the sort of assignment that Sanfilippo says allows him to leave work at the end of the day feeling as if his contribution makes a difference. Sanfilippo and his colleagues at the Rockville-based agency rated their employer among the top federal agencies for job satisfaction in the annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey administered by the Office of Personnel Management.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
Travelers gripe about having to remove shoes while going through airport security or undergoing full-body pat-downs. But imagine being the Transportation Security Administration screener who has to deal with thousands of grumpy passengers daily or must rummage through strangers' dirty underwear to look for items that could blow up a plane. It is not surprising that TSA employees rank among the federal workers who are least content with their jobs. Some of the most satisfied employees year-in, year-out work at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, according to the Partnership for Public Service, a nonprofit that encourages careers in government.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Howard Community College, Anne Arundel Community College and University of Maryland, Baltimore County have been named among the best colleges in the nation at which to work, according to a study by the Chronicle of Higher Education. The three local schools were among 97 recognized, having earned a spot in at least one of 12 categories that the national publication used to determine an exceptional college workplace. The Chronicle, which released the results Monday in its third annual report, "The Academic Workplace," said that 43,000 employees (including 20,000 faculty members)
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | August 3, 2008
How would you measure job satisfaction? For employees in a new survey, job security is the most important aspect of satisfaction. The Society for Human Resource Management, which conducted the survey of 601 employees, says the answer underscores the uncertainty workers are feeling in a slumping economy in which experts differ on whether we're in a recession or not. With housing and credit markets in turmoil, the trade group says the economic climate is...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 1, 2008
All those devoted to teaching deserve praise and respect, and none more than those who teach where all the school lunches are free, where expectations have been too low for too long, and where every hand goes up when the guest speaker asks: "How many of you know a family member who's in prison?" Ed Morman was there, in a classroom at Patapsco Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore's Cherry Hill, when a former prison warden asked that question. Every hand went up again when the kids were asked if they'd ever been inside a prison for a visit.
NEWS
June 3, 2007
Howard High School principal is praised I was sorry to read the claims of low job satisfaction at Howard High School in your May 27 article ("Howard High low in job satisfaction"), not because I sympathize with the dissatisfied staff, but because they suggest how much work there is yet to be done at the school. Our oldest child just graduated from Howard, and the difference between the school that he entered and what Howard is today is like night and day. We admire the work Ms. Regina Massella has done as principal.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 7, 2014
My husband the sportswriter received an award last week from the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons for a meticulously reported story on the surgery that repaired Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson's devastating knee injury. Talk about tough judges. I was there to accept it for him because he was covering the Kentucky Derby, where the athletes have twice as many legs and not much chance of recovering from a serious joint injury. My husband writes a lot about sports injuries.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | February 5, 1992
We have seen the futurePercent of male high school seniors who believe work is a central part of lifeIn 1976: 41 percentIn 1986: 35 percent-- From "Monitoring the Future" survey, the Institute for Social ResearchBaby boomers bowing outPercentage of working women aged 26 to 45 who expect to reduce their job commitments in the next five years: 43Percentage of them who say they will quit work altogether in next five years: 23.Percentage of men who say they...
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | May 27, 2007
Seventy-one percent of school system employees responding say that overall morale at their work site is good, while 85 percent of respondents indicate confidence in Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin, according to the 2006-2007 job satisfaction survey conducted by the Howard County Education Association. HCEA President Ann DeLacy shared the survey results with county school board members during Thursday's meeting. Of 6,300 employees the union represents, 3,089 - about 200 fewer than last year - completed the 28-question survey, which was distributed in December to teachers, guidance counselors, support professionals, instructional assistants, nurses, social workers and cafeteria workers.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | May 27, 2007
When it comes to employee satisfaction, Howard High School has ranked near the bottom in the county system for the past two years, according to a job climate survey conducted by the Howard County Education Association. Although test scores have increased and the school has received a much-needed renovation, Howard High employees responding to the survey were among the least satisfied workers at the system's 71 schools. "Overall, it's in the bottom 10 schools," said Ann DeLacy, president of the Howard County Education Association.
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