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Job Placement

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NEWS
April 10, 1991
Carroll Community College is one of the 12 participating agencies inthe Carroll County Job Placement Network.The network is an association of job placement professionals providing placement and referral services -- free of charge -- to job seekers and employers.One phone call to any of the following participating agencies will allow the job listing to be distributed among all agencies through a computer system:* Carroll Haven Supported Employment program.* Summer Enterprises Supported Employment program.
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NEWS
May 24, 2013
Republicans and Democrats appear to agree on at least one thing: that the United States is facing a STEM (science, technology engineering and math) crisis. In his most recent State of the Union address, President Barack Obama declared that he wants to "reward schools" that focus on STEM classes, for they are "the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. " And as far to the other end of the political spectrum as you can get, Gov. Rick Perry of Texas deemed May 6-12 to be the first ever "Celebration of STEM Education Week in Texas.
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NEWS
December 22, 2005
Charles H . Greene, a retired job placement agency owner, died of cancer Saturday a t t h e Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Otterbein resident was 82. Born in Rochester, N.Y., and raised in Scranton, Pa., he enlisted in the Marine Corps during WorldWar II and took part in the Iwo Jima invasion and later the occupation of Japan. After his discharge in 1946, he earned a degree at the University of Scranton. He worked in New York and New Jersey before going to Saudi Arabia and Yemen, where he worked for more than a decade with the Arabian American Oil Co. and Cities Service Co., later known as CITGO.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
Officials at the Developmental Disabilities Administration have launched an investigation into why $25 million was left unspent by the agency, and the new executive director says he expects answers by the end of the year. The agency serves 20,000 but has a waiting list of 5,000, and some could have benefited from the money, said Frank Kirkland, who took over the post in August, about the time when fiscal year-end auditing found that accounting errors had cost funding. Kirkland wouldn't say if anyone was disciplined or what the root of the problem may have been.
NEWS
January 27, 1992
The Lady Maryland Foundation has selected Parker Rockerfeller as vice president of development for the non-profit corporation, which is dedicated to education, job training and job placement of youth from diverse backgrounds.Rockerfeller will be assisting with fund-raising efforts and will oversee promotional and special events, includingthe Save Our Skipjacks campaign at the Foundation's Maritime Institute.For the past four years, Rockerfeller has managed his own company, which markets high resolution satellite photos as posters.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | August 7, 2009
The news this week that a graduate of a New York college is suing her school because she cannot find a job has generated a lot of water-cooler buzz. Trina Thompson alleges that Monroe College's career center did not help her with job placement. She's seeking $70,000 to compensate for her tuition and $2,000 for stress related to her job-search process. The college says it provides career support for all its students. But the lawsuit raises larger issues about the difficulty of finding a job during the worst economic times since the Great Depression and the role a college or a career center plays in a student's professional advancement.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
East Baltimore's Christopher Place, formerly an overnight shelter for homeless men, held a job fair last week. The event was part of the the shelter's new residential job placement initiative, which replaced many of its emergency aid programs last month."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | May 23, 1991
It's an unconventional housewarming party, a midday cheese-and-crackers fete to woo the business crowd.Instead of asking the guests to bring a plant or fondue kit, Opportunity Builders Inc. wants them to give a job.The non-profit vocational training program for the mentally retarded is having an open house today from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. to solicit more contracts with local companies.Business owners will be givena tour of the organization's new home in Hanover and asked for packaging and assembly contracts, said Vickie Callahan, director of operations.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
Officials at the Developmental Disabilities Administration have launched an investigation into why $25 million was left unspent by the agency, and the new executive director says he expects answers by the end of the year. The agency serves 20,000 but has a waiting list of 5,000, and some could have benefited from the money, said Frank Kirkland, who took over the post in August, about the time when fiscal year-end auditing found that accounting errors had cost funding. Kirkland wouldn't say if anyone was disciplined or what the root of the problem may have been.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
One month after "Black Thursday," the day hundreds of Baltimore County workers lost their jobs, four have found work in the private sector through the county's job placement center, and three have filled vacancies in county government.A dozen other county jobs are available, though they won't be filled until mid-April at the earliest, according to personnel officials.The depressed economy isn't making the job search easy for those out of work. Many older, former middle-management workers are "harder to place" because they want jobs with salaries and duties comparable to the jobs they lost, says John M. Wasilisin, the county's job placement administrator.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | August 7, 2009
The news this week that a graduate of a New York college is suing her school because she cannot find a job has generated a lot of water-cooler buzz. Trina Thompson alleges that Monroe College's career center did not help her with job placement. She's seeking $70,000 to compensate for her tuition and $2,000 for stress related to her job-search process. The college says it provides career support for all its students. But the lawsuit raises larger issues about the difficulty of finding a job during the worst economic times since the Great Depression and the role a college or a career center plays in a student's professional advancement.
NEWS
December 22, 2005
Charles H . Greene, a retired job placement agency owner, died of cancer Saturday a t t h e Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Otterbein resident was 82. Born in Rochester, N.Y., and raised in Scranton, Pa., he enlisted in the Marine Corps during WorldWar II and took part in the Iwo Jima invasion and later the occupation of Japan. After his discharge in 1946, he earned a degree at the University of Scranton. He worked in New York and New Jersey before going to Saudi Arabia and Yemen, where he worked for more than a decade with the Arabian American Oil Co. and Cities Service Co., later known as CITGO.
NEWS
September 7, 2005
THE MARYLAND Correctional Training Center in Hagerstown has been putting men to work for four decades. The prison was built to educate inmates and teach them masonry, plumbing and other trades so they could get a job when they got out -- and presumably stay out. That mission has taken on an urgency today as corrections officials in Maryland and nationally seek to curb the return of millions of ex-offenders to prison. The medium-security prison's nine training workshops can teach a man to build a brick wall, repair an air conditioning system, even design a Web site.
BUSINESS
By Lizzie Newland and Lizzie Newland,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
People out of work often turn to their mortgage company to ask for a break on their loan while they look for a job and money is tight. But some customers of NovaStar Mortgage are asking for more than that. The Kansas City, Mo., company that has offices in Maryland is offering free job placement services to borrowers who are out of work. Unemployment is one of the biggest factors in borrowers' falling behind on their mortgage payments, according to housing experts. And industry leaders believe that more companies will develop similar programs because it is cheaper - and more beneficial - for banks to help customers fix their financial problems than to foreclose on a home.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2004
In a room with four framed posters labeled "ATTITUDE," Joe Jones is giving out-of-work Baltimore residents a hard time. "Why were you here late?" he asks. "Stop," he adds, when one woman blames her three kids. He hands her the employee guidelines from a Fortune 500 company, has her read them aloud: "If you are late, you will not be admitted." "Those of you who don't have any real determination to get a job ... you have an opportunity to leave now," Jones declares, surveying the 100 faces.
NEWS
July 29, 2003
Sally Paris Myers Fobes, who was featured in the lyrics of the popular 1962 Baltimore rock 'n' roll hit "Life's Too Short," died of complications from polymyalgia and congestive heart failure Wednesday in Easton. She was 59. Born Sally Myers in Richmond, Va., she moved with her family to Gibson Island and later to Towson, where she graduated from Towson High School in 1962. In high school, she and another female student were selected to be mentioned in the lyrics of "Life's Too Short," a tune by a local band, The Lafayettes, which landed in the national top-10 record rankings.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
One month after "Black Thursday," the day hundreds of Baltimore County workers lost their jobs, four have found work in the private sector through the county's job placement center, and three have filled vacancies in county government.A dozen other county jobs are available, though they won't be filled until mid-April at the earliest, according to personnel officials.The depressed economy isn't making the job search easy for those out of work. Many older, former middle-management workers are "harder to place" because they want jobs with salaries and duties comparable to the jobs they lost, says John M. Wasilisin, the county's job placement administrator.
NEWS
September 7, 2005
THE MARYLAND Correctional Training Center in Hagerstown has been putting men to work for four decades. The prison was built to educate inmates and teach them masonry, plumbing and other trades so they could get a job when they got out -- and presumably stay out. That mission has taken on an urgency today as corrections officials in Maryland and nationally seek to curb the return of millions of ex-offenders to prison. The medium-security prison's nine training workshops can teach a man to build a brick wall, repair an air conditioning system, even design a Web site.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
GETTING hard-core addicts to stop using drugs is one thing; getting them to stay off drugs and lead normal, socially productive lives is often quite another. That's what makes statistics from Recovery in Community (RIC) - a novel substance abuse program in one of Baltimore's most drug-infested areas - so promising. Twenty-four of 27 addicts who "graduated" from the program in August 2000, with a year free of drug use, were tracked by program managers and an independent evaluator. Of those, 17 (or 71 percent)
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 9, 2000
WICHITA, Kan. - Danny Ayres already has the training he needs for an information technology position in desktop support and network maintenance. Now, he wants to help others who, like him, are physically disabled but want to work. Ayres provides desktop support for the School for Adaptive Computer Training at Wichita's Cerebral Palsy Research Foundation. Training for a job in information technology, he said, could make a huge difference in the life of a person with a disability. "Just talking to you on the phone, you would have no idea that I have a disability," said Ayres, 25, who was born with spina bifida, a spinal defect.
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