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NEWS
By Blanca Torres and Blanca Torres,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
MANY WORKING Americans find themselves stretched for time in an economy that requires companies to do more with less to stay competitive. So as workers are left with more to tackle, some study the office habits of colleagues to identify who is being efficient and who is slacking. How do the frequent break-takers get anything done, and aren't they slowing everyone else down? Are the workers who look too busy to say hello the top performers? Maybe not. The image of a productive employee being someone who works long hours and is chained to a desk is not always the best test for who is getting the most done, experts say. Improving job performance relies more on organizing your life, getting enough rest and making sure you have good working conditions than on constant back- or mind-breaking work, they say. "We think of productivity as the ability to do more with less, and that's really a short-term solution to being productive," said Rachna Jain, a licensed psychologist and job coach who is based in Bethesda.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 7, 2014
There are any number of reasons to miss a committee vote here or there in Annapolis that are legitimate and reasonable. A legislator might be under the weather, an emergency might arise or there might be a death in the family. Perfect attendance does not make perfect job performance, as the role of an elected representative is more than pressing a button or raising a hand. But the recent revelations regarding the voting patterns of Del. Jon S. Cardin, the presumed front-runner to be Maryland's next attorney general, go far beyond the typical or understandable - or perhaps the reasonable given the lack of explanation that he has offered so far. As a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, he missed 121 out of 164 votes, or roughly 75 percent of the panel's decision-making during the last 90-day session, which wrapped up one month ago. That is a veritable avalanche of lost voting, and this is not some minor committee.
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NEWS
July 6, 2003
Nearly three out of four women are not getting eight hours or more of sleep per night during the work week. Two-thirds say sleeplessness causes problems in their relationships, and 27 percent say it hurts their job performance. - National Sleep Foundation
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 13, 2013
You have to wonder what kind of fun Vatican mystery writer Dan Brown would have with the startling resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. As would be the case when any well-known CEO suddenly steps down "for health reasons," we are immediately suspicious. Was he, like the last pope to step down voluntarily more than 700 years ago, simply the wrong man for the job? A shy and aging scholar overwhelmed by the demands of guiding the church through the scandals of sex abuse and money laundering, who was happier in the library than on the balcony at St. Peter's?
NEWS
December 26, 2012
Letter writer Rosalind Ellis says that her union membership meant to her "job protection, seniority rights, benefits assured by contract and protection from arbitrary termination" ("A world without unions would be a terrible place," Dec. 19). She is absolutely correct. The only issue is that all of this is guaranteed regardless of job performance or even despite one's performance on the job. No matter what happens, it's nearly impossible to be fired. This is the reason that unions, which were important years ago, have become an albatross.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | October 17, 2004
My employer recently let me go for "poor job performance." Even though my supervisor claimed I was a lousy worker, they paid me cash off the books for working a Saturday. Is this legal? If not, is there an agency to contact? You're linking unrelated issues. Companies don't generally make a distinction between productive and nonproductive employees in determining how to pay them. And the Internal Revenue Service doesn't care about the method of payment as long as the appropriate taxes are deducted.
NEWS
June 4, 1991
The House of Representatives is expected to vote today on a civil rights bill dealing with discrimination in the workplace. Three separate bills will be considered, one sponsored by President Bush, one sponsored by the Democratic leadership and some Republicans, and one by the Black Caucus.QUOTASBush: No provision.Democratic compromise: States that nothing in the Act shall be construed to encourage, require, or permit an employer to adopt quotas." Defines "quota" as a fixed number or percentage to be attained or not exceeded, regardless of ability to meet the qualifications for a job.Black Caucus: No provision.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Publicly accused of sexual impropriety and under investigation for potential criminal offenses, President Clinton saw his approval ratings change markedly in public opinion polls this week. They went up.Pollsters say they are not surprised, given Clinton's personal history, the surging American economy and the fact that his State of the Union speech came in the middle of this furor."We're prosperous. We're not at war. He's a master at giving a speech," said Republican pollster Linda DiVall.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
Maryland voters are generally unhappy with Gov. Parris N. Glendening's job performance, but not as displeased as they used to be.Poll results released yesterday show Mr. Glendening is given a "good" or "excellent" rating by just 34 percent of voters across the state, while 56 percent see his performance as "fair" or "poor." The remaining 10 percent are undecided.While those numbers are considered weak for any politician, they are an improvement from a March poll, which gave the governor a positive rating from 18 percent of voters and a negative review from 65 percent.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | January 6, 1993
It's official. Baltimore lost more jobs than any metropolita area in its region in 1991 and fared only slightly better than recession-socked areas such as New York, Boston and Los Angeles.In its final analysis of job losses for 1991, the U.S. Department of Labor said yesterday that the Baltimore metropolitan area lost 46,000 jobs, or 4 percent of its employment base. That was the fifth-worst showing of any metropolitan area in the nation.Baltimore City alone lost 29,000 jobs, or 6.3 percent of its employment base, in 1991, according to the report issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
Letter writer Rosalind Ellis says that her union membership meant to her "job protection, seniority rights, benefits assured by contract and protection from arbitrary termination" ("A world without unions would be a terrible place," Dec. 19). She is absolutely correct. The only issue is that all of this is guaranteed regardless of job performance or even despite one's performance on the job. No matter what happens, it's nearly impossible to be fired. This is the reason that unions, which were important years ago, have become an albatross.
NEWS
By Blanca Torres and Blanca Torres,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
MANY WORKING Americans find themselves stretched for time in an economy that requires companies to do more with less to stay competitive. So as workers are left with more to tackle, some study the office habits of colleagues to identify who is being efficient and who is slacking. How do the frequent break-takers get anything done, and aren't they slowing everyone else down? Are the workers who look too busy to say hello the top performers? Maybe not. The image of a productive employee being someone who works long hours and is chained to a desk is not always the best test for who is getting the most done, experts say. Improving job performance relies more on organizing your life, getting enough rest and making sure you have good working conditions than on constant back- or mind-breaking work, they say. "We think of productivity as the ability to do more with less, and that's really a short-term solution to being productive," said Rachna Jain, a licensed psychologist and job coach who is based in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
The U.S. Department of Justice recently sent representatives to Baltimore to interview federal prosecutors about the job performance of their boss, Maryland U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio. The department has not released any conclusions or recommendations stemming from those interviews, which were conducted this fall. But those familiar with the discussions, who requested confidentiality for fear of retribution from DiBiagio or the Justice Department, said several assistant U.S. attorneys told auditors that DiBiagio should be removed.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | October 17, 2004
My employer recently let me go for "poor job performance." Even though my supervisor claimed I was a lousy worker, they paid me cash off the books for working a Saturday. Is this legal? If not, is there an agency to contact? You're linking unrelated issues. Companies don't generally make a distinction between productive and nonproductive employees in determining how to pay them. And the Internal Revenue Service doesn't care about the method of payment as long as the appropriate taxes are deducted.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2003
Howard County's circuit administrative judge is piloting a new evaluation program that asks lawyers and others to rate the county's three judicial masters on everything from their legal know-how to their temperament and fairness during hearings. The forms, which are sent to a sampling of those who appear before the masters, use a five-point scale and question, among other things, the judicial officials' punctuality, attentiveness and even-handedness. Judge Diane O. Leasure, Howard's circuit administrative judge since January last year, said she began distributing the questionnaires in June after realizing that she had no formal way of studying the masters' job performance, even though she was responsible for rating them for a county bonus program.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
Nearly three out of four women are not getting eight hours or more of sleep per night during the work week. Two-thirds say sleeplessness causes problems in their relationships, and 27 percent say it hurts their job performance. - National Sleep Foundation
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | October 27, 1991
I know someone whose first hint that her new boss was unhappy with her work was a note on her desk saying, "You've been with us for six months. It's time you got with it! If you can't work faster, why don't you resign? The people in this department are sick of covering for you!"My first editor, on the other hand, guided and directed his reporters by screaming across the newsroom, "Who's the stupid ------ who wrote this ------ piece?" and "We got news breaking here! Which one of you sorry SOBs is going to get your butt out there and see what's happening?"
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | June 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's highest court this week reinstated two state employees fired in 1990 for violating a Schaefer administration substance-abuse order after they were convictedin unrelated off-the-job drunken-driving cases.Daniel Coles and Charlene Dashiell had been fired even though their direct-care jobs at the Holly Center, a facility for the developmentally disabled in Salisbury, were not designated as "sensitive positions" covered by the governor's April 1989 executive order until January 1990, months after their arrests.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2000
Another member of the Columbia Council is supporting an independent audit of travel and other expenditures made by Columbia Association President Deborah O. McCarty. Kirk Halpin, of Kings Contrivance village, is the second of 10 board members to call for an outside review of expenditures that have included trips to Florida, Georgia and California during the past 18 months. "As a publicly elected official from the village of Kings Contrivance, I believe that the public has the right to know how their assessments and membership dollars are being used by Deborah McCarty," he said.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Publicly accused of sexual impropriety and under investigation for potential criminal offenses, President Clinton saw his approval ratings change markedly in public opinion polls this week. They went up.Pollsters say they are not surprised, given Clinton's personal history, the surging American economy and the fact that his State of the Union speech came in the middle of this furor."We're prosperous. We're not at war. He's a master at giving a speech," said Republican pollster Linda DiVall.
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