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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Horseshoe Casino Baltimore's general manager said Tuesday that joint efforts by his company and the city government to recruit local employees for the new gambling center near downtown have paid off, as Baltimore residents have received about half of the 2,200 job offers made so far. It is not clear how many city residents would be hired for the facility's 1,700 to 1,900 full- and part-time jobs because the job offers were made pending background checks...
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Horseshoe Casino Baltimore's general manager said Tuesday that joint efforts by his company and the city government to recruit local employees for the new gambling center near downtown have paid off, as Baltimore residents have received about half of the 2,200 job offers made so far. It is not clear how many city residents would be hired for the facility's 1,700 to 1,900 full- and part-time jobs because the job offers were made pending background checks...
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FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | July 31, 1992
LINDA, Calif. -- Measurement science: It's a little-known, well-paid job that's more or less yours for the asking. The only trouble is, you might have to move when you learn how to do it."For every student I have, I have eight job offers waiting," said Don Schrader, measurement science instructor at the only school in the United States where the subject is taught -- Yuba College."Employment is virtually guaranteed, with a national demand. But because most people don't want to move, our enrollment is down," Mr.Schrader said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
To trim operational costs, Baltimore County officials may offer eligible employees a retirement incentive package that could lead to the elimination of about 200 jobs. At the request of County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, the County Council introduced a bill Monday detailing the offers that will be made to about 1,100 eligible employees in the county's workforce of about 8,000. Those eligible for and interested in the offer would have to apply no later than Dec. 30 and would end their service by Feb. 29. Members will discuss the proposal at the Sept.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | March 5, 1993
TOKYO -- For most of this century, millions of Japanese parents have devoted their lives to pushing children toward a single practically sacred goal: university graduation and the lifetime job it assured.But this month, in yet another manifestation of the Japanese recession's impact on long-held standards and expectations, the arrangement is coming undone in places:Financially strapped companies are reneging on job offers their recruiters made only a few months ago to students nearing graduation.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 16, 2006
Like couples who are loath to discuss estate planning before the wedding, workers often fail to study retirement plans as they consider a new job. Focusing on salary alone, however, could leave a hole in the nest egg at retirement. Say you have two job offers, one paying $50,000 and the other $47,000. The higher salary comes with no matching funds in the retirement plan, while the lower one has a 3 percent match if you contribute 6 percent. Assuming you contribute 6 percent of your salary for 30 years, not including pay raises, you'd have $372,584 in your retirement plan at the higher-paying job, according to a calculator at Bankrate.
NEWS
February 10, 1991
County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann has appointed William T. Baker Jr. acting director of the Department of Public Works.Baker, 36, will temporarily fill the post vacated by retiring Public Works director Thomas F. Smith until a replacement is found. Baker has been with the Department of Public Works for six months as deputy director for the Division of Engineering.Smith announced his retirement two weeks ago, saying he was considering job offers in the private sector.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, who has led the force for more than five years, has turned down several job offers in recent months, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said last week.Frazier has repeatedly declined to comment on speculation that he will leave his post before Schmoke leaves office in December. Many candidates seeking Schmoke's job have said they would replace the commissioner.In an interview Wednesday, Schmoke said Frazier's job opportunities are unrelated to the mayoral campaign.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features | July 29, 1991
Dear Joyce: I recently applied for a sales position with a computer supply firm after answering an ad in the newspaper. I underwent interviews with two managers and was offered and accepted the job. That was on Monday. On Friday, when, as I had been instructed, I called back to establish the time to start my training period, the hiring manager came on the phone and explained that after seeing so many people, he decided to go with someone else. In a matter of seconds I became unemployed again.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | December 22, 1991
After losing two jobs in two years, with no health insurance and her savings long gone, Karen Price was at home going over another list of employment leads when opportunity came calling.A man she had worked with four years earlier phoned to offer a job starting up a new family entertainment center in Timonium."I was flabbergasted," she said. "He asked if he could hire me away from my job, and I told him he was in luck -- I didn't have a job."For Ms. Price, 32, it proved that a good reputation was better than a good resume in finding work.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tanika White and Megan Hartley and Jamie Smith Hopkins, Tanika White and Megan Hartley,Sun reporters | April 5, 2008
They got their education during good economic times, but the nation's graduating college seniors are about to enter the job market just as conditions have rapidly taken a turn for the worse. The federal government said yesterday that U.S. employers have cut jobs for three months straight, a total of 232,000 positions gone. The number of jobs lost in March - 80,000 - was the most in five years, when the country was struggling to throw off the lingering effects of the last recession. Economists are once again bandying about the "R" word on a daily basis.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2007
Victor Breehne thought he had a job with Black & Decker Corp. all sewn up. He said the Towson-based power tools manufacturer made him an offer. All he had to do was pass a medical exam. But Breehne alleges the offer was rescinded because he flunked a "nerve conduction study" the company uses to predict if a person is likely to develop carpal tunnel syndrome, an often-disabling wrist and hand injury caused by repetitive motion. He has filed a class action suit in federal court in Tennessee, claiming the company violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has challenged the use of such tests, which aren't uncommon in manufacturing settings, on ADA grounds.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
Almost 200 displaced workers from Baltimore's now-shuttered General Motors factory were offered jobs this week at the automaker's plants in Wilmington, Del., and White Marsh - a move that will considerably shrink the company job bank set up two years ago to pay laid-off personnel. A company spokesman said yesterday that 170 workers would be transferred to the Wilmington assembly line where three models are made. Another 21 workers with the most seniority would move to GM's Allison Transmission plant in Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 16, 2006
Like couples who are loath to discuss estate planning before the wedding, workers often fail to study retirement plans as they consider a new job. Focusing on salary alone, however, could leave a hole in the nest egg at retirement. Say you have two job offers, one paying $50,000 and the other $47,000. The higher salary comes with no matching funds in the retirement plan, while the lower one has a 3 percent match if you contribute 6 percent. Assuming you contribute 6 percent of your salary for 30 years, not including pay raises, you'd have $372,584 in your retirement plan at the higher-paying job, according to a calculator at Bankrate.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 5, 2006
It may not be your parents' workplace anymore, since many companies are putting an end to pension plans and forcing workers to take on more responsibility for their retirement. But entering the work force today, you still can find employee benefits - just in a different form. Today, 57 percent of the 300 companies surveyed by the National Association of Colleges and Employers offer a pension plan to entry-level workers, down from 70 percent in 2004. In place of this traditional benefit, companies are ramping up their defined-contribution plans, such as 401(k)
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
Harford County's James M. Harkins, the state's only Republican county executive, announced yesterday that he will leave office 17 months before his term ends to take a top environmental job in the Ehrlich administration. Harkins will head the Maryland Environmental Service, an independent, quasi-state agency that operates dozens of water and wastewater plants around the state and drew complaints last year about its handling of a troubled facility in Centreville on the Eastern Shore. "It's a little bit of an emotional day," Harkins said at an afternoon news conference in Bel Air, ending months of rumors that he would leave for Annapolis.
NEWS
March 8, 2004
Free workshops offered this month to help job-seekers The Maryland Job Service, a division of the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, and the Howard County One-Stop Employment Center are offering free workshops this month to help job-seekers find work. "Strategies for Employment," a one-session overview of job search services available at the Howard County One-Stop Center, is offered from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on three Thursdays - this week and March 18 and 25. A "Resume Critique" workshop, focused on creating high-impact resumes, will be held from 10 a.m. to noon March 15. An "Early Intervention" workshop covers resumes and cover letters, networking and interviewing.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2005
Brigette Higgins Cable technician for Comcast Corp. Age: 37 Years in business: 11 Salary: The median salary for an experienced telecommunications technician in the Baltimore area is $52,571, according to salary.com. How she started: Higgins attended a trade school for travel and tourism in Kissimmee, Fla. She worked for a while at a hotel there and other jobs including Circuit City. She soon decided she wasn't an indoor person and returned to Baltimore, where a relative suggested she apply to Comcast.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2005
Brigette Higgins Cable technician for Comcast Corp. Age: 37 Years in business: 11 Salary: The median salary for an experienced telecommunications technician in the Baltimore area is $52,571, according to salary.com. How she started: Higgins attended a trade school for travel and tourism in Kissimmee, Fla. She worked for a while at a hotel there and other jobs including Circuit City. She soon decided she wasn't an indoor person and returned to Baltimore, where a relative suggested she apply to Comcast.
NEWS
March 8, 2004
Free workshops offered this month to help job-seekers The Maryland Job Service, a division of the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, and the Howard County One-Stop Employment Center are offering free workshops this month to help job-seekers find work. "Strategies for Employment," a one-session overview of job search services available at the Howard County One-Stop Center, is offered from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on three Thursdays - this week and March 18 and 25. A "Resume Critique" workshop, focused on creating high-impact resumes, will be held from 10 a.m. to noon March 15. An "Early Intervention" workshop covers resumes and cover letters, networking and interviewing.
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