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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Michael Lofthus, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Jackie Carter had it all mapped out. She would attend college year-round and graduate early, land a job in criminal justice, start paying off student loans, move into her own apartment and invest in her first smartphone. But the 22-year-old Towson University graduate has seen her life after college veer off course. Carter, who graduated in December with a degree in sociology/anthropology with a criminal justice concentration, is living with her parents in Fallston, working as an intern and wondering whether her original goals are forever out of reach.
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NEWS
August 19, 2014
The headline on the news release out of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation yesterday sounded pretty great: "Private Sector Gains 18,700 Jobs Over-the-Year. " Read the body of the release, though, and you'll discover the actual news was not so great. In July, it says, Maryland actually lost 9,000 jobs, one of the worst performances in the nation and a distinct outlier in a month when 36 states and Washington, D.C., gained jobs. Not that the agency was dwelling on that.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Simone Knighten is hunting for a job. Hunting and hunting. The 20-year-old Baltimore resident thinks it's harder now than when she landed work at restaurants in the past two years. She's spending days at one of the city's Youth Opportunity centers, getting help with her search. "I've been looking since January," said Knighten, sitting in the West Baltimore building with brightly painted walls. "I've been going all around, calling back and everything, but it didn't seem like anything was working, so that's why I came here.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Megan Mocik never envisioned herself as a stay-at-home mother. After having twins four years ago, the former marketing manager for New York-based International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. was determined to press on with a career, even one that came with lengthy commutes and long workdays. But getting back into the workforce proved difficult and came with unappealing trade-offs. The Bel Air woman chose a path taken by more mothers today, choosing to stay home with the kids - reversing a decades-long trend.
NEWS
May 15, 2013
Years ago it was unthinkable that smart, ambitious and college-educated young people would have trouble finding entry level work ("Slow start," May 12). Today, this youthful demographic has been simultaneously dumped on a shrinking employment market and also burdened with horrendous student loans. To me, it's just another example of our country's war on the middle class. Considering this glut of a highly trained, highly motivated generation, why is there a need to add immigration reform to the mix as it will only increase competition?
BUSINESS
January 21, 1991
One on One is a weekly feature offering excerpts of interviews conducted by The Evening Sun with newsworthy business and civic leaders. Roberta Kaskel is assistant dean of the Career Services Office at the University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Law.Q. What is the job market like now for graduating attorneys? Is it more difficult for them to find jobs because of the recession?A.The recession has had a definite impact on the job market nationally, significantly in the Northeast quadrant.
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda | April 3, 2005
In the 1950s and 1960s, a man typically married at age 23 and a woman at age 20. With a high school education, the husband could find a steady job to support his wife and, later, their children. Today, that family would stand only a 50 percent chance of living above the poverty level, says Timothy Smeeding, a public policy and economics professor at Syracuse University. Gone is the ample supply of well-paid blue-collar jobs that allowed earlier generations to establish households in their late teens or early 20s. Now, the job market is more competitive, making it difficult for young adults to become financially self-sufficient and take the traditional steps to adulthood: career, marriage and child-rearing.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | September 18, 2005
THE JOB MARKET is looking up for students. This school year, employers are expected to hire 14.5 percent more new college graduates than they did last year, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers. That positive sign - the third consecutive year of projected hiring increases - might lead seniors and recent graduates to think a job offer will be in the bag. But no matter how strong the hiring environment, landing a job (at least one that you want) takes more initiative.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Wasserman and Elizabeth Wasserman,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 30, 1995
First, "E.R." bumped "L.A. Law" from the TV lineup.Now, life is mimicking art.Faced with a glut of lawyers in the job market, undergraduates in record numbers are forgoing jurisprudence for a dose of medicine and business acumen.Applications to medical schools nationwide have been steadily rising while they dropped off dramatically at law schools this year.At the same time, the bust in business school enrollments, forecast since the stock market crash of 1987, is now a boom. Some master's of business administration programs are seeing increases of as much as 39 percent in applicants this year.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
When US Airways Group Inc. lays off 11,000 employees in the coming weeks, the out-of-work pilots, flight attendants and mechanics will be cast into a job market suffering from a slowing economy. Compounding the problem, especially for pilots, is that not only are most of the other airlines having similar difficulties, but the workers' skills are so specialized that it will be hard for them to find other jobs for which they are qualified. "There will be thousands of pilots trying to start new careers over this," said Roy Freundlich, a pilot and spokesman for the US Airways unit of the Air Line Pilots Association.
NEWS
By Wala Blegay | May 6, 2014
President Barack Obama's recent grant award to three Prince George's county schools for the development of student apprenticeship programs in high-demand Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) industries, is a sign of a paradigm shift in American education. Traditional higher education is no longer the guaranteed pathway to successful, prosperous careers and wealth. President Obama and governmental stakeholders are recognizing that skilled job-training or apprenticeship programs in diverse fields are the best solutions to improve economic development for generations of young Americans.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
I am completely puzzled by the recent commentary on the shortage of lab workers ( "Help wanted: lab workers," April 23). Yes, there is a shortage and will be a great need for laboratory technologists as most of us are reaching retirement age, but the piece is completely misleading. I work in two different hospital laboratories, and since Obamacare was implemented, there has been a huge number of layoffs and furloughs at both institutions. The laboratory at another campus completely shut down!
NEWS
March 20, 2014
As legislation that has every good intention gets watered down, the downtrodden get trod on even more ( "Banning the box," March 17). The intention of the "Ban the Box" employment bill before the Baltimore City Council is not to get jobs to those who need them, it is to get those who need jobs into the front door in order to have a conversation about a job. When we allow businesses to put loopholes in this kind of a law, we still allow the...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Simone Knighten is hunting for a job. Hunting and hunting. The 20-year-old Baltimore resident thinks it's harder now than when she landed work at restaurants in the past two years. She's spending days at one of the city's Youth Opportunity centers, getting help with her search. "I've been looking since January," said Knighten, sitting in the West Baltimore building with brightly painted walls. "I've been going all around, calling back and everything, but it didn't seem like anything was working, so that's why I came here.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Maryland's job base is finally back to the size it was half a decade ago — before the deep recession gouged a big chunk out of it. It's a psychologically important milepost in the long slog toward recovery, one reached as the nation is still climbing out of the hole. But numbers released Friday by the U.S. Department of Labor show the state's job market remains far from normal. About 219,000 Marylanders were out of work and looking for a job in August, 120,000 more than in February 2008, just before the effects of the Great Recession caught up with the state.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Teresa Hicks' career in the Navy stretches back 24 years, with assignments on land and sea, and deployments around the world as both an enlisted sailor and an officer. Fresh out of the military, Hicks now is navigating a sea of a different sort: the civilian job market. And that has meant translating the military jobs she once held, such as "damage controlman," into titles such as "shipboard firefighter," that private employers can more readily understand. Today's job market is challenging, but particularly so for veterans whose experience isn't always clear to the companies that might hire them, Hicks said.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features Inc | March 30, 1992
Other than majors in engineering, computer science and health care, graduates this year may feel like a catastrophe has struck the job market.How catastrophic? A federal recruiter who had signed up to pick graduates at the University of Texas-Austin called Barbara Euresti, the university's liberal arts placement center director, to announce that the recruiting trip was canceled.It seems that his department has been eliminated and he asked if Ms. Euresti could help him find a job.If you have friends graduating this year, a great gift is the encouragement to anticipate tricky interview questions.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
Patrick McAvoy knew his job had some drawbacks. As a contract employee at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, he lacked benefits and long-term stability, but he stayed on as an events coordinator for three years, hoping to be hired full time and seeing little opportunity elsewhere. This year, the job market shifted, and by spring, he had two offers. "It was pretty stunning. You send out resumes so many times and don't hear anything back. Then you hear back from multiple places, and all of them are good opportunities for your future," said McAvoy, 28, who turned down an information technology job at the Johns Hopkins University to be an events planner for the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Ryan Clarke's senior campaign at Salisbury ended prematurely after he suffered a ruptured spleen in the fourth game of 2013 and was shut down for the rest of the year after a brief appearance in the fifth contest. The midfielder, who registered 35 goals and 29 assists in 2012 and was an early candidate for the Tewaaraton Award, could use his final year of eligibility in 2014, but that is not a certainty. “That's yet to be determined,” coach Jim Berkman said. “Ryan has eligibility to come back, but no decision has been made on whether he's going to do that or not do that.
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