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NEWS
September 1, 2003
THIS LABOR DAY, with the fragile U.S. economy finally showing some life, Americans confront the deep trouble of not just a jobless recovery, but a job-loss rebound - the result of still weak demand, incessant corporate cost-cuts and the quickening march of jobs abroad. About this time - 29 months after the onset of the last recession and 21 months after its official end - employment ought to be expanding. But this recovery remains uniquely scarred by outright job losses. It's so bad that the unemployment rate's recent dip to 6.2 percent was big news.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Juggling the rising cost of textbooks, tuition, food and rent is a little more manageable now for rising University of Maryland, Baltimore County senior Keyerra Jeter, thanks to a June 1 raise in starting pay to $9 per hour for Gap Inc.'s 65,000 employees. "It was difficult, with everything being so expensive all the time, to budget for everything on a minimum-wage salary," said Jeter, an employee of the Old Navy in Waugh Chapel. "I'm just thankful the increase has let me better meet the needs that I have.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Maryland shed 6,000 jobs in April, the federal government said Friday — the largest monthly loss in the country during a month when most states gained, but one that might have been overstated. The figures, which are preliminary and adjusted for seasonal variations, paint a much less rosy picture of Maryland employment than in recent months. As it released the April numbers, the U.S. Department of Labor said Friday that it also revised downward its estimate for March, showing Maryland losing 600 jobs rather than adding 1,500.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The purchase of Hampstead-based Jos. A. Bank Clothiers by Men's Wearhouse will likely mean fewer jobs in Carroll County, where the suit company is the fourth-largest employer. Local officials said Tuesday that it is too early to know how severe the job loss will be at Bank's headquarters and its three distribution centers in the county. "We just have to keep our fingers crossed," said County Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, whose District 2 includes Hampstead and whose son and brother work for Bank.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The purchase of Hampstead-based Jos. A. Bank Clothiers by Men's Wearhouse will likely mean fewer jobs in Carroll County, where the suit company is the fourth-largest employer. Local officials said Tuesday that it is too early to know how severe the job loss will be at Bank's headquarters and its three distribution centers in the county. "We just have to keep our fingers crossed," said County Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, whose District 2 includes Hampstead and whose son and brother work for Bank.
TRAVEL
By Jane Engle and Jane Engle,Tribune Newspapers | April 26, 2009
You pay thousands in deposits for a trip, then get laid off. Now what? If your travel insurer, cruise or airline company offers a "job-loss guarantee," you might get your money back. Or not, depending on the policy. Job-loss coverage is nothing new in travel, but more companies have jumped in the past two months. JetBlue Airways, Norwegian Cruise Line and at least two cruise sellers have announced layoff policies, and insurers are tweaking the rules. Typically, such policies return trip deposits if you get laid off. In March, Travelex Insurance Services of Omaha, Neb., a big industry player whose travel policies have covered job loss since 1996, decreased from three years to one year the length of time you must be with an employer to qualify for the benefit, said Vice President Sally Dunlap.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | October 1, 2006
There was a time when Conchy Bretos thought she would spend her entire career in government. Then Bretos lost a 1993 election for a seat on the Dade County Commission in Florida after a nasty campaign. And when she tried to return to her job as executive director of the county's Commission on the Status of Women, Bretos was fired. While her supporters complained bitterly that it was political retribution, she was not reinstated. She lost her political clout and many of her personal contacts, but Bretos was able to use one of her important contacts to become Florida's assistant secretary for aging and adult services.
NEWS
January 13, 1996
IT WAS A STUNNING BLOW to folks in Garrett County, Maryland's western-most subdivision. Bausch & Lomb, the area's largest employer, announced it was shutting its 25-year-old plant in Oakland by the end of the year. That means a loss of 600 good-paying jobs in a town of only 1,700 residents. The company's contribution to the local economy nearly equals the entire county budget.Oakland's mayor said he was in "disbelief." There was no advance warning, no time for a counter-offer. Bausch and Lomb is struggling.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | August 14, 2005
IMAGINE WALKING into your office, as always, and discovering that your desk has been cleaned out; your department is shuttered and locked; or you have 30 minutes to collect your belongings and leave. Would you be able to cope with unemployment? Companies are hiring - unemployment stood at 5 percent in July, down from more than 6 percent two years ago - but the job market is less than robust. And there's always the risk that your employer will defy statistics: Technology giant Hewlett-Packard Co., for instance, announced last month that it would eliminate about 10 percent of its full-time work force.
BUSINESS
By Adriane Miller and Adriane Miller,Special to The Sun | October 28, 1991
The first time he was fired, Bill Gentz didn't have a clue about what was coming. He got the pink slip just a few hours after receiving a favorable performance review and a raise.Mr. Gentz, who had been planning how to tell his wife about his raise, suddenly found himself rehearsing how to tell her he'd lost his job."I was in a state of shock. It came out of the blue," Mr. Gentz says of the layoff in 1981. He still resents the way the Philadelphia chemical company let him go without warning after 10 years of service.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 11, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will stand in for Gov. Martin O'Malley in making the administration's case to a House committee Tuesday for raising Maryland's minimum wage. O'Malley had been scheduled to testify before the House Economic Matters Committee , in one of his last appearances before the General Assembly.  But he will instead attend the funeral of Baltimore construction magnate and philanthropist Willard Hackerman , who died Monday at age 95. The House panel will hear from a bevy of supporters and opponents of increasing the state's lowest hourly pay rate in stages to $10.10 an hour by 2016.
NEWS
By Betsy Johnson | January 22, 2014
With climate disruption increasingly affecting Maryland's priceless environmental treasures, it's time the federal government stopped bargaining with our natural resources and started protecting our future as it looks to import and export more resources overseas. The Trans-Pacific Partnership - a massive trade pact between the U.S. and 11 countries along the Pacific Rim - could result in more environmental degradation, job loss, and more dangerous fracking affecting nearly every aspect of our lives, from the quality of our water to the quality of our jobs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
The General Motors factory in Baltimore, the Solo Cup plant in Owings Mills and the steel mill at Sparrows Point all made things for decades. And all closed in the past 10 years. It's a familiar tale for much of the country. But Maryland's manufacturing job losses - the result of cutbacks, shutdowns and technological innovations requiring fewer people - are among the nation's steepest. The state saw a faster pace of job reductions in the sector than all but seven other states and the District of Columbia in the past six years, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis comparing the most recent Labor Department figures with the period just before the recession.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Severna Park company Dynasplint Systems Inc. laid off 500 employees, including about 250 in Maryland, on Tuesday after its lender moved to foreclose on its property, including cash that was to cover payroll. In a letter to laid-off employees obtained by The Baltimore Sun, company President George Hepburn wrote that a local bank put about $1 million that the company had deposited since Aug. 1 toward a $9 million line of credit owed, instead of employee paychecks. Hepburn said he had to cut the company's work force by 70 percent as a result.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
In a recent Sun article, "Labor officials bring minimum wage push to Baltimore" (May 14), a researcher from the labor union-supported Economic Policy Institute claims that the "majority of minimum-wage earners work for large companies in the retail, fast-food and hospitality sectors, not for small businesses. " This is not true: Two-thirds of lower-wage workers are at businesses with 100 or more employees, not "large companies. " These 100-employee businesses could just as well be a small restaurant franchisee with five locations or a regional grocery store chain with three locations.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Maryland Hospital Association said Friday that jobs may be in jeopardy if a state commission approves a plan that would make hospitals absorb all of the 2 percent Medicare cuts required under federal sequestration. The board of the Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets the state's hospital rates, is scheduled to vote Wednesday on how to implement the cuts. The commission's staff has recommended a plan that keeps hospital rates flat for the last three months of fiscal year 2013, which ends June 30. Hospitals are pushing for a rate increase to help offset the cost of the cuts.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
Maryland tied for the fastest pace of job loss in the past year in June, the federal government estimated Friday, the second month in a row that the state was at or near the bottom of the heap. The state's unemployment rate — which had been trending downward for months — hit 7 percent in June, up from 6.8 percent in May, the U.S. Department of Labor reported. It was the first time the jobless rate had risen since January 2010. Maryland lost nearly 15,000 jobs over the past 12 months, spread across most major sectors, according to the agency's estimates.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
The Carroll commissioners are working on a reorganization of county government that would, among other changes, create a separate Department of the Environment, officials said yesterday. The board also is expected to make recreation and parks its own department and to restructure the Office of Public Safety, which has been roundly criticized in recent months by volunteer firefighters. The changes, which officials are calling "a reconfiguration," will not cost the county any money, and they won't cost anyone his or her job, the officials said.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
If Robert Reich is looking for "baloney" in the debate over minimum wage hikes, he should start with his recent commentary in The Sun ("The minimum wage and the meaning of a decent society," Feb. 20). Contrary to Mr. Reich's claim, the academic and economic consensus that wage hikes lead to job losses is overwhelming and based on far more than just vague claims. A nonpartisan review conducted by David Neumark (UC-Irvine) and William Wascher (Federal Reserve) concluded that 85 percent of credible economic studies on minimum wage increases from the last two decades point to job loss following a wage hike.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Kudos to Bill Barry for his comprehensive explanation of why jobs lost during the Great Recession are not coming back ("A farewell to jobs?" Feb. 8). The list of reasons is extensive: new technologies that obviate the need to rehire workers, corporate mergers, government cutbacks, increased productivity, and off-shoring of jobs, just to mention a few. (Not mentioned is our ever-increasing population, which only makes the problem that much worse). Mr. Barry's article gives the lie to the so-called "job creators" and their political stooges who keep insisting that cutting taxes for wealthy individuals and corporations will stimulate employment.
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