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NEWS
March 20, 2012
A report last year that Maryland ranked last in the nation for job creation over the previous 12 months deserves a response ("Maryland ranks last in job creation," June 18). Let's get rid of the Baltimore Development Corporation, the Maryland Economic Development Group, and any public or quasi-public group in this state that has business development in its charter. Think of all the millions of dollars we could save to put to better use, such as lowering the personal and corporate tax rates here.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
More than five years into the economic recovery, many Maryland households still aren't feeling the lift. Overall personal income - including wages, investment income and payments from programs such as Social Security - grew an estimated 1 percent in the second quarter of 2014 in Maryland, compared to 2.5 percent in the United States as a whole. That showing - the fifth worst of all the states - followed four years of statewide incomes lagging behind the rest of the country, driven by a lack of growth in job-related income, according to an analysis the state's Department of Planning published last week.
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NEWS
October 10, 2012
My father has worked at the same furniture manufacturing company for over 30 years. He has worked his way up from an entry level position to the senior director of manufacturing. The company has grown and shrunk many times along the way. As projects were secured, they had the flexibility to hire up to 100 people to get the job done. This is how a business should work, right? Well, this is no longer an option. Currently, his company employs 55 people. Under the regulations of Obamacare effective in January, a heavy fine will have to be paid by companies with over 50 employees that do not provide health insurance.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 28, 2014
Bullet point opinions on the topical issues of the day, for your consideration: •Regarding America's present war footing, our military brass are saying what common sense would dictate: It's gonna be really difficult to defeat (rather than contain) ISIS without professional soldiers ultimately doing the dirty work on the ground. Which also raises the question of what if our "rent-a-moderate-Syrian-freedom fighter" strategy fails? In other words, will an anti-war president (re)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
Mass layoffs spiked in July as Maryland job growth continued to slow, a sign that the sputtering national economy is hitting home. Employers added a total of 500 jobs, with more brisk hiring in the private sector tempered by the loss of temporary Census Bureau positions, the U.S. Department of Labor estimated Friday. That's the smallest increase since the state switched course from losses to gains in March, according to figures adjusted to account for seasonal changes in hiring and layoffs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Michael Spinosa overflows with enthusiasm about the team that helped his Columbia company figure out new strategies for growth — at no charge. That might not sound like economic development, if your conception of it is multimillion-dollar incentives to tempt big employers to move in. The assistance Spinosa got is a different approach with the same goal: more jobs. Connecting established local companies to expert help — pioneered as "economic gardening" in Littleton, Colo.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 25, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday afternoon signed into law a package of bills aimed at spurring job growth in the state, including a $5,000 tax credit for businesses that hire off the unemployment rolls. O'Malley had initially proposed a $3,000 credit, but state lawmakers bumped up that amount. Asked about the change, O'Malley said the approved credit "won't create as many jobs" but said "the ones it does create, it will create them a lot sooner." President Barack Obama has proposed a similar $1,000 tax credit for businesses that hire out-of-work Americans.
EXPLORE
November 22, 2011
I was recently one of the many citizens to attend the public workshop about the Baltimore Washington Intermodal Facility. I was impressed by the sheer volume of information presented. I am looking forward to additional information as plans progress, and encourage my fellow community members to be a part of this process as it continues. We need to let the process work and recognize the benefits of this facility to Maryland, wherever it is sited. We also have to remember that in order to grow the current job offerings in our community we need to objectively evaluate all opportunities presented.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
Maryland's economists and business leaders are treating the state economy like it's Punxsutawney Phil, the nation's official groundhog: If they cross their fingers and watch closely, they believe, they can see signs that an economic springtime is just around the corner.That was the tone at yesterday's second annual Maryland Chamber of Commerce Economic Outlook, presented to several hundred people at the Stouffer Harborplace Hotel."The Maryland economy is expected to show moderate growth in terms of gross state product, personal income, retail sales and tax revenues," said a report prepared for the chamber by a panel of economists at several of Maryland's colleges and universities.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Employment figures released yesterday provided the clearest evidence to date that the economy has slowed from last year's unsustainable pace, but that it retains enough strength to avoid braking too severely.Job growth slackened in August as the unemployment rate, 6.1 percent, stood at essentially the same level for a fourth straight month, the Labor Department reported yesterday. The rate had fallen markedly early this year.The data, which provide the first broad view of economic performance for the month, seemed to reduce further the chance that the Federal Reserve would raise short-term interest rates again at its policy meeting this month.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
The headline on the news release out of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation yesterday sounded pretty great: "Private Sector Gains 18,700 Jobs Over-the-Year. " Read the body of the release, though, and you'll discover the actual news was not so great. In July, it says, Maryland actually lost 9,000 jobs, one of the worst performances in the nation and a distinct outlier in a month when 36 states and Washington, D.C., gained jobs. Not that the agency was dwelling on that.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Silicon Valley giant Oracle Corp. plans to acquire Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. for $5.3 billion in a deal executives and industry observers said could generate local job growth instead of the typical corporate consolidation. In the deal announced Monday, Oracle offered $68 per share for Micros, about 20 percent more than the shares traded for before rumors of the deal began circulating last week. Oracle would gain the company's stable of brand-name customers, growth opportunities and niche technology processing sales in the hotel, restaurant and retail industries.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Maryland's economy has grown almost without fail in the last quarter-century, ticking up year after year. But not in 2013. That's according to early estimates from the U.S. Department of Commerce, which showed Maryland's gross domestic product stagnating last year - putting the state near the bottom of the national pack. Only the District of Columbia and Alaska fared worse. It's another indication that 2013 wasn't great for Maryland, where federal budget cuts had an outsized effect because of the state's big cluster of federal contractors and agencies.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Michael Spinosa overflows with enthusiasm about the team that helped his Columbia company figure out new strategies for growth — at no charge. That might not sound like economic development, if your conception of it is multimillion-dollar incentives to tempt big employers to move in. The assistance Spinosa got is a different approach with the same goal: more jobs. Connecting established local companies to expert help — pioneered as "economic gardening" in Littleton, Colo.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Private employers in Maryland led the way to modest job gains in March, and the state unemployment rate remained essentially unchanged since February, according to preliminary figures released Friday by the U.S. Department of Labor. The agency estimated a net gain of 2,300 jobs, and posted the state's unemployment rate at 5.6 percent, meaning 174,500 people in the state were unemployed last month. The March national unemployment rate was 6.7 percent. Job gains occurred chiefly in the private sector, led by retail, transportation and utilities with 2,200 jobs; followed by professional and business services, including technical fields, scientific research and cybersecurity, with 1,200; and financial services with 600. These were offset by losses in education and health, leisure, manufacturing and construction.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Maryland employers could pick up the pace of job creation to 40,000 positions this year, according to some forecasts, but one local economist expects a slowdown instead. Moody's Analytics and Towson University's Regional Economic Studies Institute expect fairly broad-based job growth in 2014 - they're both predicting about 40,000 positions added in the state, which would be the best performance in years. Full results for 2013 aren't in yet, but Maryland employers added about 34,000 jobs in the 12 months ending in November, according to federal estimates.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 25, 2006
Thanks to a year-end spurt of job creation, the city of Baltimore posted its best employment growth last year since 1999, according to preliminary figures disclosed yesterday by the Labor Department. No doubt gubernatorial candidate Martin O'Malley will quickly heap credit on Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley, especially if the city's homicide rate keeps up its dismal January pace. "Today, job growth has returned to Baltimore," O'Malley's campaign Web site trumpeted even before yesterday's figures came out. But as is often the case, politicians should be careful about claiming to generate economic growth - or at least this politician.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 5, 1996
ACCORDING TO the newest data, Maryland's economy looks bad.The state's in recession, if you believe the numbers. We seem to be losing jobs faster than we're creating them -- for the first time in five years.Total state employment in December was 2,600 jobs less than in December 1994, according to the federal government's Bureau of Labor Statistics. In November the deficit was 1,800 jobs compared with the same month in 1994. That's a slide down from slight growth of 11,500 jobs -- 0.5 percent -- for August.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
By most statistical measures, 2013 will be remembered as a respectable but not great year for the U.S. economic recovery. The gross domestic product grew by about 2.5 percent, which was slightly better than the nation has seen since the end of the Great Recession, and the number of jobs grew by about 200,000 a month. But you wouldn't know that on Wall Street, which just wrapped up a year that was anything but average. By any standard, it was a monster year for stocks, one of the best of all time and a surprise to all the investment doomsayers.
NEWS
By Feng Tao | October 14, 2013
Rockville researchers are on the cusp of developing the first-ever malaria vaccine. The impact on global health would be revolutionary - the mosquito-borne disease sickens 200 million people each year and claims more than half a million lives. This latest breakthrough is just one of many flowing from Maryland's biotech companies. Our bioscience sector is now poised to lead the fight against a long list of diseases - from cancer to Alzheimer's. And while medical innovation has significant health benefits, advances in the life sciences have also had tremendous spillover gains for our state's economy.
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