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NEWS
October 8, 2012
Mitt Romney parrots the standard Republican line that raising marginal tax rates for top income earners will stifle job creation ("Battle is joined over jobs, taxes," Oct. 4). Just once I would like someone to point out that employees of these small businesses are not paid out of after-tax income. Marginal tax rates notwithstanding, no business owner is going to hire or retain for very long a worker whose production cannot be translated into gross receipts that exceed the cost of employing that worker.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The state has approved bigger tax breaks for industrial properties in Southeast Baltimore, including the site of a new Amazon warehouse. Designed to spur job creation, the benefits took effect Tuesday. The new "focus areas" provide property owners with a 10-year, 80 percent property tax credit on value added by physical improvements. They also boost the credits granted for wages paid to new employees and offer breaks for investments in "personal property," such as machinery. The benefits apply to about 2.4 square miles around Holabird Avenue and about 7.4 square miles in Orangeville, excluding the residential area.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | May 17, 2013
A strong and sustainable 21st century economy can only be built from the bottom up. And today, as President Barack Obama visits Baltimore, it is this fact that will drive us to join with him to renew a call for Congress to focus on common-sense investments that create middle-class job opportunities now and reward America's economic future. Here in Baltimore, when it comes to economic development and jobs, the future of our local economy is heavily dependent on three critically important areas that require continued, targeted investments: public education, infrastructure, and job skills and readiness.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 2, 2014
Those of us of a certain age recall the scene all too well: Lucy pulling the football away just as Charlie Brown was about to kick it, visions of football glory dancing in his head. Charlie Brown always fell for the prank, believing that Lucy would finally come through next time around. Today's apologists for President Barack Obama believe (much like Charlie Brown) that the next policy or program will surely jump start a tepid, jobless recovery. And, as true believers, they are always surprised when it doesn't, when Lucy pulls the football.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
I'm writing in response to the article "Maryland ranks last in job creation" (June 18). This ranking should be of no surprise to anyone. Maryland has allowed itself to become almost entirely dependent on government employment. This has gone on for several administrations and multiple decades. Little effort has been given to private sector employment opportunities because the public sector employer has been the primary source of employment and of political focus. Imagine for a brief moment what employment would be like if Washington wasn't within a commutable distance.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
The Republican Mantra of "Don't tax the rich," they create jobs!" is a fallacy. Can anyone name a single job created by the Bush tax cuts? Businesses operate efficiently, hiring or firing according the demand for their products and services. Venture capitalists and investors are looking to make a profit. Their investment may be used for equipment to replace labor or add labor. Stock market investors are looking for profits. Their money doesn't go to the companies whose stock they buy. Taxes affect profits, demand affects jobs.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | February 5, 2012
Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley played surrogate for the Obama administration Sunday morning, appearing on CNN's State of the Union to offer his views on the GOP presidential nomination fight, the president's chances for re-election and the economy. O'Malley was paired with Republican Gov. Robert McDonnell of Virginia for the roughly 10 minute piece. Each chairs his respective party's governors association. O'Malley had the in-studio advantage, sitting across the table from CNN host Candy Crowley.
NEWS
September 22, 2011
Congressional Republican leaders have reportedly asked Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke to refrain from any further monetary stimulus during policy makers' two-day meeting this week. Specifically, they asked in a letter to Mr. Bernanke that the Federal Reserve "resist further extraordinary interventions in the U.S. economy, particularly without a clear articulation of the goals of such a policy, direction for success, ample data proving a case for economic action and quantifiable benefits to the American people.
NEWS
By Christopher B. Summers | January 16, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley says his goal for the 2012 legislative session is "job creation. " The real goal is much simpler: more government spending to benefit his most diehard political supporters and those in the construction community who benefit largely from government contracting. This is political payback to the teachers unions - which have generously contributed money and warm bodies to his campaigns - dressed up as job creation. He wants the legislature to approve $372 million in funds to build new public schools.
NEWS
By Robert Lynch | October 29, 2012
When Mitt Romney ran for Massachusetts governor in 2002, the private equity magnate said he was uniquely qualified to create jobs, particularly in the private sector, and to lure employers to the Bay State. Instead, under his leadership the state was the fourth-weakest in the country for total job growth and the third-weakest for private-sector job growth - causing hundreds of thousands of his fellow residents to leave Massachusetts, seeking opportunities elsewhere, the data show.
NEWS
By Scot T. Spencer | September 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's announcement this month of an investment of $1.5 billion into the state's transportation program came close on the heels of President Barack Obama's recent commitment to grow national manufacturing. Both of these efforts represent an incredible opportunity to spur an industry with real potential and bring jobs back to our shores. The Red and Purple rail lines in Baltimore and suburban Washington that Maryland plans to build are just two of many projects across the country aimed at expanding and modernizing existing public transportation systems to meet increased demand from commuters and residents.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Two Baltimore nonprofits received a $520,000 federal grant for a program to help create jobs in medical research and biotechnology. The Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore and nonprofit BioHealth Innovation Inc. are establishing what is known as a Healthcare Regional Innovation Cluster. The initiative will support efforts to turn laboratory research into medical technologies and startup companies in the Baltimore area and Montgomery County. The groups work with institutions like the National Institutes of Health to help identify promising technologies and connect them with investors to launch new companies and create jobs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Wednesday kicked off an autumn-long series of appearances intended to highlight his record over the past seven years and to set the stage for the final year of his administration. O'Malley has scheduled five "policy forums" organized around the theme of "Better Choices, Better Results. " The opening event, held Wednesday at Goucher College, promoted the governor's legacy, included a give-and-take with business leaders and allowed a campaign plug for Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown — O'Malley's choice to succeed him. "We've restrained spending growth but we've also had the guts to make investments in education and innovation and, yes, in infrastructure, and I have the scars to prove it," O'Malley, a Democrat, told an audience largely made up of supportive business executives and state and local officials.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
A decade-old loan forgiveness program with Morgan Stanley will move forward Wednesday after Baltimore's spending panel agreed to give the company more time to meet its job-creation goals. The Board of Estimates, controlled by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, approved modifications to the plan without discussion. The city and the New York-based investment bank agreed in 2003 to expand an operations center in Baltimore based on economic development incentives. The city agreed to loan the company $3.25 million - half of which could be forgiven - on the condition that Morgan Stanley created 1,500 jobs by 2018.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
In return for the promise to bring another 650 jobs to Baltimore, city leaders are poised on Wednesday to give financial services giant Morgan Stanley more time to meet the terms of a $3.25 million loan forgiveness program. The Board of Estimates vote comes amid public outcry over the city's plan to grant millions of dollars in aid to the $1.8 billion Harbor Point development, but some critics of that plan say the Morgan Stanley deal provides a proven return on investment. "We made an agreement to them in good faith.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | May 17, 2013
A strong and sustainable 21st century economy can only be built from the bottom up. And today, as President Barack Obama visits Baltimore, it is this fact that will drive us to join with him to renew a call for Congress to focus on common-sense investments that create middle-class job opportunities now and reward America's economic future. Here in Baltimore, when it comes to economic development and jobs, the future of our local economy is heavily dependent on three critically important areas that require continued, targeted investments: public education, infrastructure, and job skills and readiness.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
Maryland employers added jobs for the fourth straight month in June but did so at a fraction of the pace of the previous three, creating 1,600 new positions. Even so, the state's employment picture was better than most in a difficult month for a large part of the nation, according to figures released Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Labor. Twenty-seven states — more than half — recorded losses as tens of thousands of temporary census jobs came to an end. In Maryland, nearly all the jobs added last month were created by the private sector.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Hampered by a slowdown in federal spending, Maryland came in dead last in the nation for its pace of job creation over the past year, shedding almost 1 percent of its employment base — nearly 20,000 positions — the U.S. Department of Labor reported. The figures released Friday show declines in Maryland in eight of the past 12 months. Twenty-two states added jobs during the past year. The preliminary report, which could be revised, isn't uniformly bad. The Labor Department's survey of households suggests that more Marylanders are working, either by finding employment out of state or by starting new businesses, neither of which would show up in the separate jobs count.
NEWS
May 11, 2013
Dan Rodricks ' advice that "complaining CEOs need to take a hike" (May 9) comes a bit late. For the first time anyone can recall, this year's Fortune 500 includes zero Baltimore-based companies. We are now the largest U.S. city without a single corporate headquarters, and there are only four left in the state - down from 11 as recently as 2007. Clearly, those who decide where to create local job opportunities (and, let's not forget, lead many philanthropic efforts) have been taking a hike for many years, just as over 300,000 Baltimore residents voted with their feet over the decades and fled the city's high property taxes, incredible shrinking economy and dismal provision of public services.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Michael Lofthus, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Jackie Carter had it all mapped out. She would attend college year-round and graduate early, land a job in criminal justice, start paying off student loans, move into her own apartment and invest in her first smartphone. But the 22-year-old Towson University graduate has seen her life after college veer off course. Carter, who graduated in December with a degree in sociology/anthropology with a criminal justice concentration, is living with her parents in Fallston, working as an intern and wondering whether her original goals are forever out of reach.
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