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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
State prison officials say they will no longer demand that job applicants provide passwords to social media accounts. Candidates will be asked for access but have the option of refusing, according to the prison agency. The announcement Wednesday by the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services was a response to a complaint filed with the American Civil Liberties Union by a corrections job applicant, who said he was offended and troubled by a prison official's request for his Facebook password.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Jeanne Keen bustled in the door, black blazer over a dress shirt, a file folder with paperwork in her shoulder bag. If only she were walking into work. Then she would have a paycheck. A way to save her Dundalk rowhouse from foreclosure. A daily outlet for her need to do . This August morning, 361 days after her last at a paid job, she stopped by home to pick up her 24-year-old son - also looking for work - so they could drive to a job fair together. Her file folder was full of resumes.
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NEWS
By Melissa Harris | June 15, 2007
The Department of Homeland Security patrols the nation's borders, issues passports and deports illegal immigrants. But the linchpin of future of immigration enforcement is stored in a secure facility in Woodlawn, where computer servers hold the digital Social Security records of hundreds of millions of Americans. Since 1996, a growing number of employers have logged on to a password-protected Web site and queried those records to see whether job applicants are here legally. The screening system, called Basic Pilot, is run by the Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Paul Mincarelli has been trying for three years to get into international work for the federal government. He says he knows the odds are stacked against him. Now the competition is likely to get more intense. Some agencies have begun to limit the number of applications they accept per vacancy. Instead of setting a deadline for applications, some job announcements stay open only until the limit - in some cases as few as 25 resumes - is reached. Mincarelli, 26, has a master's degree in international affairs.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Despite federal laws outlawing racial discrimination and promoting equal opportunity in employment, "the unequal treatment of black job seekers is entrenched and widespread," a nationally recognized urban research organization concluded in a study released yesterday.The Washington-based Urban Institute, analyzing the experiences of 476 two-man, black-and-white teams specially trained to seek employment in Washington and Chicago last summer, found that in one of every five times blacks applied for entry-level positions -- 20 percent of their applications -- they were denied treatment equal to whites.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | October 7, 1993
A growing number of employers are requiring job applicants to pay for their own drug tests, saying they are fed up with paying millions of dollars for drug users who flunk the tests.The trend started with temporary agencies, construction companies and other employers offering entry-level positions -- some of whom say half of their job applicants are flunking drug tests.But more companies are embracing the practice, saying that charging for the test up front discourages drug-using applicants from wasting companies' time and money.
BUSINESS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
OCEAN CITY -- When Paul Boyce lost his job as a program administrator for a Utah manufacturer, the 38-year-old headed east to a job as a motel clerk.When Dollye Schroyer's hours were rescheduled to include weekends under Macy's reorganization, the 55-year-old bookkeeper opted for a job selling candy on the Ocean City Boardwalk.And when Dale Parker graduated from the University of Maryland-Eastern Shore last month with a bachelor's degree but no employment prospects, he returned to a counseling job he had held the previous summer in the state's largest resort.
TOPIC
By Diane Stafford | May 13, 2001
WE TALK a lot about the gaps. The gender gap. The digital divide. The salary gap. The generation gap. Owners vs. employees. Government vs. business. Labor vs. management. Sometimes, schisms overwhelm commonalities. Sadly, I put forth another rift: the ability gap. It may be the most gaping workplace cleft of all. Today's work force is riven between those who have the basic skills needed in most 21st-century jobs and those who don't. Last year, one out of three job applicants failed pre-employment tests at workplaces that gave them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 18, 2003
How Would You Move Mount Fuji? by William Poundstone. Little, Brown. 288 pages. $22.95. This is a dead-serious book about recruiting practices and abstract reasoning -- presented as a puzzle game. Long before Microsoft became internationally notorious for asking job applicants impossible-to-answer questions, imaginative professors and some strategists of business and other enterprises were using the imponderable hypothetical question to test the minds, wills and temperaments of lesser humans.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp. is planning a month-long series of free workshops and networking events designed to help the county's unemployed residents find jobs. Of 60,000 available jobs in the Baltimore region, 11,000 are in Anne Arundel County, said Kirkland J. Murray, the group's president and CEO. The group operates one-stop and career connection centers in the county. Back-to-Work month, from April 2 to May 3, will help jobless residents develop skills to better compete in an improving job market, the group said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Efforts have begun in Baltimore to prepare the city's workforce for about 1,700 jobs that are expected to arrive with the late-summer opening of the Horseshoe Casino on Russell Street. City Councilman Carl Stokes will host a jobs fair with Horseshoe officials on Feb. 5, at which interested applicants will be able to submit their applications and ask about job openings. At the event, to be held in the Oliver Community Association building at 1400 East Federal St., officials will look for "job applicants in every category from accountants to customer service representatives," an event announcement said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
At 36, Jason Easley has made a living waiting tables, tending bar and laboring on construction jobs. He feels he's qualified to do other things, but he can rarely get an interview - a problem he blames on drug and assault convictions. The West Baltimore man says he'd like the chance to explain his past mistakes, but he is screened out when he checks the box directing job applicants to disclose any criminal history. "On record, I am a bad person, but I am really not a bad person," Easley says.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Baltimore County's recent settlements with two firefighters and a police officer who alleged the county violated federal disability law will cost taxpayers more than $1 million — more than county officials had previously revealed. The three settlements include a total of more than $545,000 in back pay, damages and attorney's fees, according to Kathleen Cahill, the workers' lawyer. Together, the two firefighters also could get between about $500,500 and more than $757,000 in retirement benefits, depending on how much longer they work, Cahill said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Anne Arundel Workforce Development Corp. is planning a month-long series of free workshops and networking events designed to help the county's unemployed residents find jobs. Of 60,000 available jobs in the Baltimore region, 11,000 are in Anne Arundel County, said Kirkland J. Murray, the group's president and CEO. The group operates one-stop and career connection centers in the county. Back-to-Work month, from April 2 to May 3, will help jobless residents develop skills to better compete in an improving job market, the group said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Toys "R" Us, alleging the company broke the law when staff at its Columbia store refused to provide a sign-language interpreter for a job applicant who is deaf. The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, says the retailer discriminated against the woman, Shakirra Thomas, after she applied for a position at the store in 2011. It alleges the company violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires employers to provide "reasonable accommodations" for job applicants and workers with disabilities.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
A supervisor at Baltimore's Register of Wills office tried to hide a felony conviction from his or her employer, according to a report by the office of legislative audits. The supervisor, who is not named, had been convicted of felony theft and was ordered to pay back more than $100,000. Acting legislative auditor Thomas J. Barnickel III said his team was tipped off that the person put false information on an employment application. "Unless we were tipped off on this, this wouldn't be something we would look for or typically find," he said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1997
Baltimore Goodwill Industries and the city Department of Social Services have teamed up to open a one-stop job center to help welfare recipients move into paying jobs.In addition to having a wide variety of programs to assist job hunters, the new center houses a Social Services office that qualifies job applicants for the services, said Fred de Gregorio, a vice president of Goodwill."It keeps people from running all over town. They can do everything at one site," de Gregorio said of the center, which was officially opened by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke in a ceremony Friday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Stepping up its assault on illegal immigration, the Clinton administration announced yesterday a nationwide expansion of a pilot program in California that requires participating employers to verify the legal status of job seekers.Specifically, the Immigration and Naturalization Service reached agreement with the nation's four largest meat-packing companies, representing 80 percent of the industry's 70,000 employees, to use a computerized data system at 41 plants in 12 Western and Midwestern states to determine if job applicants are legal workers.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 4, 2012
Seven years ago this week, I put out a plea to the drug dealers of Baltimore to stop killing each other and to give me a call (at 410-332-6166) if they'd like help finding legitimate work. The phone started ringing immediately, and it rang for months, and then years. Drug dealers were among the callers. However, the vast majority were men who had been incarcerated for a whole range of offenses but who now couldn't find work. And it wasn't for lack of trying. Too many employers, they said, refused to hire someone with a criminal record.
NEWS
January 26, 2012
Despite the fact that Mitt Romney ranks among the top 1 percent of richest Americans, the bottom line is that he is one of the 8.5 percent of unemployed Americans (as he had no earned income in 2010, according to his tax return). To his credit, he is actively seeking employment (President, U.S.), and taking extraordinary actions to become a wage earner. Throughout this time of hardship, he has not made a single plea for a government handout, only handouts (campaign contributions)
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