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Job Action

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NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | November 13, 1991
Angered by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's plan to close Baltimore schools for five days, the Baltimore Teachers Union voted yesterday to stage a job action until he reconsiders the cost-cutting furlough.Linda Prudente, a spokeswoman for the union's 6,800 teachers and 1,800 classroom aides, said that beginning today, members will work to the terms of their contract, meaning they will turn down hall duty, cafeteria duty, after-school meetings and other voluntary assignments.About 1,000 teachers and aides packed yesterday's meeting and urged the mayor to reconsider the union's cost-cutting proposals, including an early-retirement program.
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NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | April 2, 2008
Baltimore County teachers battling with County Executive James T. Smith Jr. over a lack of pay raises stepped up their pressure yesterday, marching outside his office and participating in a job action by working to contract rules. Leaders of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County said they arranged the rally outside the county courthouse in Towson to bring attention to the union's push for at least a 3 percent cost-of-living increase. "Today we have come together as a united team to strongly urge [Smith]
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NEWS
July 12, 1994
Public school secretaries in Anne Arundel County won't be working through their lunches or putting in overtime for the rest of the summer.The union representing the secretaries and teaching assistants, who work 12 months a year, told its members yesterday to begin working to rule to protest what it calls the school board's attempt to renege on a promised longevity raise."
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | February 22, 2008
The Baltimore County teachers union voted yesterday to start job actions - including demonstrations and refusing assignments beyond their contracted workday - to protest the school board's recent decision not to seek across-the-board pay raises. Cheryl Bost, president of the 9,000-member Teachers Association of Baltimore County, said the union met yesterday afternoon but had not decided when to begin the job actions or how long they would last. The actions might begin April 1 to coincide with the first day of Maryland School Assessment testing, she said.
NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht | July 28, 1991
Hey, have you heard the one about the coaches who cried wolf?That image endures when I think of the Howard County Coaches Association.Can you think of a group in the county that has issued more threats in the past year? And can you think of a group which has made morethreats that ultimately carried less weight than the paper on which they were written?I can't.The coaches concluded the last school year with a typical exercise. Perturbed by the County Council's refusal to approve the 6 percent raise teachers were supposed to receive under a three-year contract signed last year, coaches -- specifically "teacher-coaches" -- met several times last month to formulate an appropriate response to County Executive Charles I. Ecker and the council.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1999
The Baltimore Teachers Union threatened a job action yesterday if no contract agreement is reached before school begins Aug. 30."It won't be just the teachers," said BTU President Marietta English. "We have the support of all the labor unions." It wasn't clear yesterday if other school unions would take part in the action.School teachers can stage a "work-to-rule" job action, in which they would refuse duties not required in their contract. Many teachers do extra work, including overseeing the cafeteria, coming to school early or staying late for meetings with parents or children and keeping order in the halls.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1991
The Baltimore Teachers Union is starting a job action today to pressure Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to reconsider his decision to close schools for five days during which all school system employees would be furloughed without pay.In addition, teachers are planning a march from school system headquarters on East North Avenue downtown to City Hall next Monday evening to dramatize their plight."
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
Teachers at Severna Park High School began a work-to-rule job action yesterday to protest Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens' plan to eliminate $14.8 million worth of teacher raises from next year's budget. Under the job action, most of the school's 97 teachers are refusing to do work not required of them under the terms of their contract, such as staying after school to tutor students or grading papers at home, organizers said. Teachers picketed outside the school on Robinson Road before the beginning of the school day and after walking out together at 2:45 p.m. - the official end of their workday - in a show of solidarity.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
The union representing Carroll County teachers will not support a countywide work-to-contract job action, union officials said yesterday after the membership failed to vote to expand protests in place at several schools. In announcing the results of the vote, union leaders said a committee of teachers and school administrators would begin meeting next week to explore issues raised by teachers who have launched work-to-rule protests at at least 12 Carroll schools. Sixty percent of the teachers polled by the 1,450-member Carroll County Education Association said they would support an expansion of the job action, in which teachers are boycotting extracurricular activities to demonstrate their dissatisfaction with working conditions.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
Superintendent Charles I. Ecker responded yesterday to teachers' complaints about working conditions in Carroll County public schools by promising to hire more technicians to maintain school computers, meet every three months with teachers and develop a long-range plan for writing and changing the curriculum. Reacting to a list of concerns generated during a nearly 3-month-old work-to-rule job action by teachers at a dozen county schools, the schools chief stressed that the 15 pages he e-mailed yesterday to the school district's 2,800 employees "are only words" and that "actions will dictate our success."
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2004
Placed strategically between the soothing Mediterranean scenes in the waiting room of Foris Surgical Group in Frederick are life preservers bearing a discordant message: "Save Our Doctors." Inside each preserver ring is a notice that the practice will close Jan. 1 "due to the overwhelming burden of skyrocketing liability insurance costs." The Maryland doctors are hardly alone in pursuing such tactics to counter rising premiums for malpractice coverage. While many doctors avoid such terms as "job action," physicians around the country are increasingly taking a page out of manuals written by labor organizers and other protest movements.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2004
The Anne Arundel County teachers union called off its plans yesterday for a district-wide job action, saying it has reached a tentative agreement with the school board on a new contract after an initial disagreement over health care benefits. "There was some give and take on both sides," said union President Sheila M. Finlayson. "We worked hard to come up with an agreement for everybody." Two weeks ago, several hundred teachers voted to protest a school board proposal that would have raised their health care premiums.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2004
Several hundred Anne Arundel County teachers voted yesterday to launch a countywide job action if the school board and state continue to threaten their health care and pension benefits. The closed-door vote was held yesterday afternoon in Annapolis High School's packed auditorium, during a rare teachers union meeting open to all 4,100 members. Union officials, who have not called such a meeting in two decades, told teachers that negotiations on a new two-year contract were stalled over the issue of health insurance coverage.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2004
Several hundred Anne Arundel County teachers voted yesterday to launch a countywide job action if the school board and state continue to threaten their health care and pension benefits. The closed-door vote was held yesterday afternoon in Annapolis High School's packed auditorium, during a rare teachers union meeting open to all 4,100 members. Union officials, who have not called such a meeting in two decades, told teachers that negotiations on a new two-year contract were stalled over the issue of health insurance coverage.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2003
Jason Evans logs onto the Internet from his Hoboken, N.J., apartment using a wireless connection rather than a telephone. He uses a cell phone to call friends and family and has no plans to install a landline. And, given the choice, he always opts for the computer over directory assistance when searching for a phone number. "If I'm anywhere near a computer, I just go to 411.com," said Evans, a network engineer by trade. Customers like Evans are the reason the business world is changing for phone companies such as Verizon Communications Inc., currently immersed in closely watched negotiations for a new contract with 78,000 employees.
NEWS
June 24, 2003
Many articles, photographs and graphics in today's editions of The Sun by members of the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild do not carry bylines or credit lines because of a job action by the union. The company and union are bargaining over a new labor contract.
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