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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Writer-director James Gray sets We Own the Night in 1988. The title comes from the late-'80s motto of the NYPD's street- crimes unit, and a key location is a garish dance club where coke flows like Coke. But at heart, Gray wants to make the best American movie of 1958. This hoary melodrama about father and son New York City policemen (Robert Duvall and Mark Wahlberg) and the black-sheep, club-manager brother (Joaquin Phoenix) who helps them defeat the Russian mob is a throwback to the time when New York-based directors, bred on live TV, weren't shy or all that skillful about mixing moral earnestness with urban grit and method-acting anguish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | February 22, 2009
FILM Joaquin Phoenix: in 'Two Lovers': Shaggy and sedate, Joaquin Phoenix made such a splash recently on the Late Show with David Letterman, it would be easy to overlook why he was there. He was supposed to be hawking Two Lovers, which isn't the hot mess that Phoenix's bizarre appearance insinuated. He delivers a complex, solid performance, playing an unbalanced but likable photographer juggling two very different women. And yes, he's clean shaven. In theaters Friday. CONCERT Mos Def: Actor, poet and political activist, the renaissance man of hip-hop can be unpredictable and headstrong, but he's never boring.
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FEATURES
By Jay Carr and Jay Carr,BOSTON GLOBE | April 5, 1997
One almost hesitates to bestow upon "Inventing the Abbotts" the praise it deserves for fear of engendering wrong expectations. The appeal of this beautifully textured and strongly felt film is that it's an anti-blockbuster. Although it's set in 1957, it treats the period in refreshingly clear-eyed fashion. There's no XTC nostalgia in it, no sentimentalizing, no hindsight. It's so true to its period that it plays like a film made in 1957.Intimate in focus and structure, it's built on beautifully observed accretions of emotion and behavioral detail.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 3, 2008
McCain a big draw on Saturday Night Live John McCain was a hit on Saturday Night Live, just not as big a hit as his running mate. The Republican, who poked fun at his presidential campaign's financial shortcomings and his reputation as a political maverick in Saturday's appearance, led the show to its second-best overnight ratings since a December 1997 holiday episode. NBC estimated yesterday that when the final national viewer estimate is known later this week, it will be a little less than 12 million people.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 3, 2008
McCain a big draw on Saturday Night Live John McCain was a hit on Saturday Night Live, just not as big a hit as his running mate. The Republican, who poked fun at his presidential campaign's financial shortcomings and his reputation as a political maverick in Saturday's appearance, led the show to its second-best overnight ratings since a December 1997 holiday episode. NBC estimated yesterday that when the final national viewer estimate is known later this week, it will be a little less than 12 million people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | February 22, 2009
FILM Joaquin Phoenix: in 'Two Lovers': Shaggy and sedate, Joaquin Phoenix made such a splash recently on the Late Show with David Letterman, it would be easy to overlook why he was there. He was supposed to be hawking Two Lovers, which isn't the hot mess that Phoenix's bizarre appearance insinuated. He delivers a complex, solid performance, playing an unbalanced but likable photographer juggling two very different women. And yes, he's clean shaven. In theaters Friday. CONCERT Mos Def: Actor, poet and political activist, the renaissance man of hip-hop can be unpredictable and headstrong, but he's never boring.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1997
Love 'em or hate 'em, there's no denying that the films of Oliver Stone comprise a formidable cinematic autobiography of the director told through the prism of his -- and his generation's -- obsessions, from Vietnam to the media."
FEATURES
October 5, 2007
Film Openings THE DARJEELING LIMITED -- (Fox Searchlight) Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody and Jason Schwartzman star as brothers stranded on a spiritual journey. ELIZABETH: THE GOLDEN AGE -- (Universal Pictures) Cate Blanchett reteams with Geoffrey Rush for more of the Queen Elizabeth I saga. FINAL SEASON -- (Yari Film Group) An underdog Iowa baseball team set to be disbanded defies the odds to succeed. LUST, CAUTION -- (Focus Features) A young woman gets swept up in a dangerous game in World War II-era Shanghai.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
"Clay Pigeons" is a slick piece of work, visually pleasing and blessed with some good performances, but finally the style and vigor thrown at it don't make up for its beleaguered story. The film has flashes of humor but no brilliance or narrative complexity; it's "Red Rock West" for lazy people.Joaquin Phoenix, the sleepy-eyed, thick-tongued actor from "To Die For," plays Clay, a mechanic living in Mercer, Mont., deep in the land of sky-blue waters. Lest filmgoers think "Clay Pigeons" is another eponymous pun on the order of "Good Will Hunting," Clay is no pigeon -- which is why he gets into trouble over and over again.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 11, 2009
Series Knight Rider: : Mike (Justin Bruening) tells a DEA agent (Maria Menounos) that the plane crash she's investigating was faked and the young federal witness who was aboard has been kidnapped. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) American Idol: : The Hollywood round continues. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Criminal Minds: : The team tracks a serial killer who embalms his victims so he can keep them around for a while. Cybill Shepherd guest stars as a suspect's mother. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Lost:: Locke (Terry O'Quinn)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Writer-director James Gray sets We Own the Night in 1988. The title comes from the late-'80s motto of the NYPD's street- crimes unit, and a key location is a garish dance club where coke flows like Coke. But at heart, Gray wants to make the best American movie of 1958. This hoary melodrama about father and son New York City policemen (Robert Duvall and Mark Wahlberg) and the black-sheep, club-manager brother (Joaquin Phoenix) who helps them defeat the Russian mob is a throwback to the time when New York-based directors, bred on live TV, weren't shy or all that skillful about mixing moral earnestness with urban grit and method-acting anguish.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1997
Love 'em or hate 'em, there's no denying that the films of Oliver Stone comprise a formidable cinematic autobiography of the director told through the prism of his -- and his generation's -- obsessions, from Vietnam to the media."
FEATURES
By Jay Carr and Jay Carr,BOSTON GLOBE | April 5, 1997
One almost hesitates to bestow upon "Inventing the Abbotts" the praise it deserves for fear of engendering wrong expectations. The appeal of this beautifully textured and strongly felt film is that it's an anti-blockbuster. Although it's set in 1957, it treats the period in refreshingly clear-eyed fashion. There's no XTC nostalgia in it, no sentimentalizing, no hindsight. It's so true to its period that it plays like a film made in 1957.Intimate in focus and structure, it's built on beautifully observed accretions of emotion and behavioral detail.
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