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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 17, 1993
"Foreign Affairs" is the made-for-TV sleeper of the month. And, with a bunch of highly promoted network junk-movies on this week, you're liable to miss this little cable gem at 8 tonight on TNT if you're not careful.The film is based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Alison Lurie. And the script does the book some justice. But it's Joanne Woodward and Brian Dennehy, the stars, who deserve the prizes for their work in the TV adaptation.Woodward plays Vinnie Minor, a professor of English at a small American college who goes to England for research on her next book.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1997
Every year around this time, television earns itself a little class by airing the Kennedy Center Honors, a tribute to the best performing arts talent this country has to offer. This year's edition, set for tonight on CBS, gets the class stuff right but, for the most part, lacks the poignancy and emotion needed to make the evening something special.In fact, the tributes to Lauren Bacall, Bob Dylan, Charlton Heston, Jessye Norman and Edward Villella seem almost rushed, as though the show's producers have to get somewhere.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 8, 1991
You keep waiting for something to happen, for the familiar contours of the melodrama to assert themselves and organize the material.But they never do, which isn't beside the point, it is the point.James Ivory's combined version of two famed Evan S. Connell novels ("Mrs. Bridge" in 1959 and "Mr. Bridge" in 1969) is a detailed, harsh but not completely disrespectful portrait of the // American upper middle class, Midwest version (Kansas City, Mo.) circa the late '30s and the early '40s. Clearly based on his own parents, Connell's two novels were too artful for cheap sanctimony, but they defined lives that while rich with duty and responsibility were intellectually arid and narrowed with prejudice.
NEWS
By Richard Roeper | December 29, 1996
NOMINEES for this year's G.O.O.F. AWARD are: . . . Matthew McConaughey was touted ad nauseam as the next Paul Newman by everyone except Joanne Woodward -- before McConaughey had appeared as the primary star in even one major movie.. . . Jenny McCarthy can't sing, act, dance or tell a joke, but she can go, "Wooooooo!" while making pig faces and sticking her tongue out. For this she was given at least seven cover stories in national magazines in 1996, while Hollywood stood underneath her balcony, courting her with all its might.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Washington -- If this were England, Joanne Woodward mused they would be knighted. But this being America, they were simply -- and more democratically -- honored.But this also being Washington circa the Bush-Clinton transition, this year's Kennedy Center Honors -- celebrated this weekend by a head-turning celebrity crowd flocking to a city that usually makes do with committee chairmen and undersecretaries for its people-spotting -- seems more big-D Democratic than little-D democratic. Not only is any arts gathering assumed to be more Democrat-leaning, the annual Kennedy Center honors first were held in 1978 -- during the last period the big-Ds were in the Big Time.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A group of Democratic women, tied by politics to the White House but purposefully steering clear of direct administration influence, has begun a campaign to defend Hillary Rodham Clinton against attacks arising from her role in the Whitewater affair.The women, some of whom have expressed frustration among themselves about Mrs. Clinton's choice not to speak out vigorously on her own behalf, have been meeting for a month in Washington to plot ways to strike back at what they consider unfair press coverage and partisan assault.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A group of Democratic women, tied by politics to the White House but purposefully steering clear of direct administration influence, has begun a campaign to defend Hillary Rodham Clinton against attacks arising from her role in the Whitewater affair.The women, some of whom have expressed frustration among themselves about Mrs. Clinton's choice not to speak out vigorously on her own behalf, have been meeting for a month in Washington to plot ways to strike back at what they consider unfair press coverage and partisan assault.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1997
Every year around this time, television earns itself a little class by airing the Kennedy Center Honors, a tribute to the best performing arts talent this country has to offer. This year's edition, set for tonight on CBS, gets the class stuff right but, for the most part, lacks the poignancy and emotion needed to make the evening something special.In fact, the tributes to Lauren Bacall, Bob Dylan, Charlton Heston, Jessye Norman and Edward Villella seem almost rushed, as though the show's producers have to get somewhere.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | March 25, 1991
LOOK FOR ''Dances With Wolves'' to take most of the Oscars when the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences holds its 63rd annual awards ceremony tonight in Los Angeles.''Dances With Wolves'' should take the best picture, best actor (Kevin Costner), best director (Costner), best supporting actor (Graham Greene) and best adapted screenplay awards. The film has been nominated in other, lesser, categories, but at the moment, we're only concerned with the top 10, and ''Dances'' will take at least five of those categories.
NEWS
By Richard Roeper | December 29, 1996
NOMINEES for this year's G.O.O.F. AWARD are: . . . Matthew McConaughey was touted ad nauseam as the next Paul Newman by everyone except Joanne Woodward -- before McConaughey had appeared as the primary star in even one major movie.. . . Jenny McCarthy can't sing, act, dance or tell a joke, but she can go, "Wooooooo!" while making pig faces and sticking her tongue out. For this she was given at least seven cover stories in national magazines in 1996, while Hollywood stood underneath her balcony, courting her with all its might.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A group of Democratic women, tied by politics to the White House but purposefully steering clear of direct administration influence, has begun a campaign to defend Hillary Rodham Clinton against attacks arising from her role in the Whitewater affair.The women, some of whom have expressed frustration among themselves about Mrs. Clinton's choice not to speak out vigorously on her own behalf, have been meeting for a month in Washington to plot ways to strike back at what they consider unfair press coverage and partisan assault.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A group of Democratic women, tied by politics to the White House but purposefully steering clear of direct administration influence, has begun a campaign to defend Hillary Rodham Clinton against attacks arising from her role in the Whitewater affair.The women, some of whom have expressed frustration among themselves about Mrs. Clinton's choice not to speak out vigorously on her own behalf, have been meeting for a month in Washington to plot ways to strike back at what they consider unfair press coverage and partisan assault.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 17, 1993
"Foreign Affairs" is the made-for-TV sleeper of the month. And, with a bunch of highly promoted network junk-movies on this week, you're liable to miss this little cable gem at 8 tonight on TNT if you're not careful.The film is based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Alison Lurie. And the script does the book some justice. But it's Joanne Woodward and Brian Dennehy, the stars, who deserve the prizes for their work in the TV adaptation.Woodward plays Vinnie Minor, a professor of English at a small American college who goes to England for research on her next book.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Washington -- If this were England, Joanne Woodward mused they would be knighted. But this being America, they were simply -- and more democratically -- honored.But this also being Washington circa the Bush-Clinton transition, this year's Kennedy Center Honors -- celebrated this weekend by a head-turning celebrity crowd flocking to a city that usually makes do with committee chairmen and undersecretaries for its people-spotting -- seems more big-D Democratic than little-D democratic. Not only is any arts gathering assumed to be more Democrat-leaning, the annual Kennedy Center honors first were held in 1978 -- during the last period the big-Ds were in the Big Time.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | March 25, 1991
LOOK FOR ''Dances With Wolves'' to take most of the Oscars when the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences holds its 63rd annual awards ceremony tonight in Los Angeles.''Dances With Wolves'' should take the best picture, best actor (Kevin Costner), best director (Costner), best supporting actor (Graham Greene) and best adapted screenplay awards. The film has been nominated in other, lesser, categories, but at the moment, we're only concerned with the top 10, and ''Dances'' will take at least five of those categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 8, 1991
You keep waiting for something to happen, for the familiar contours of the melodrama to assert themselves and organize the material.But they never do, which isn't beside the point, it is the point.James Ivory's combined version of two famed Evan S. Connell novels ("Mrs. Bridge" in 1959 and "Mr. Bridge" in 1969) is a detailed, harsh but not completely disrespectful portrait of the // American upper middle class, Midwest version (Kansas City, Mo.) circa the late '30s and the early '40s. Clearly based on his own parents, Connell's two novels were too artful for cheap sanctimony, but they defined lives that while rich with duty and responsibility were intellectually arid and narrowed with prejudice.
FEATURES
March 25, 1991
Here are Sun Film Critic Stephen Hunter's picks in the major Oscar categories:Picture: "Dances With Wolves"Director: Kevin Costner, "Dances With Wolves"Actor: Jeremy Irons, "Reversal of Fortune"Actress: Joanne Woodward, "Mr. and Mrs. Bridge"Supporting actor: Graham Greene, "Dances With Wolves"Supporting actress: Whoopi Goldberg, "Ghost"Screenplay -- Adaptation: "Dances With Wolves"Screenplay -- Original: "Avalon"Foreign Language Film: "Cyrano"Cinematography: "Dances...
NEWS
July 3, 2004
Suddenly on June 30, 2004, MICHAEL RONALD HOECK, beloved son of Stephen Philip Hoeck and Deborah Ann (nee Woodward); grandson of Joanne Woodward and the late Ronald Woodward and the late Marie and John Hoeck, devoted brother of Steve, Jr., Trisha and Niki Hoeck, nephew of Sharon and Andre Sundstrom, Greg and Michele Shane, Barbara Kilchenstein, Jack and Nancy Hoeck and Mike and Carol Hoeck. Also survived by honorary grandparents, Bud and Mary Shane, many cousins, and Angel too. A Vigil Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26-A)
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