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Joan Of Arc

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By Nora Achrati and Nora Achrati,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
This was no ordinary trial. The courtroom was a 150-year-old Protestant church. The attorneys could not object to any testimony. The defendant was 600 years old - and French. Joan of Arc, the warrior burned at the stake for heresy at age 19, appeared in sweat shirt and ponytail before 200 doctors and one Maryland Court of Appeals judge yesterday afternoon as professionals tried to determine whether the girl heroine of France - who claimed to have acted on instructions from God - was, in fact, insane.
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For The Aegis | March 18, 2013
The eighth grade students at St. Joan of Arc School participated in a Conclave web chat with William E. Lori, Archbishop of Baltimore, on March 11. St. Joan of Arc School was one of 17 Catholic elementary schools invited to participate. Archbishop Lori began the web chat with prayer and a PowerPoint presentation explaining the conclave to the students. "This is a historical time in the life of our Church," the Archbishop said. Following the PowerPoint presentation, each school had one student ask a question.
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By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
Religion, feminism, nationalism: Many and large are the forces behind the continuing glorification of Joan of Arc. People tend to forget, Loyola College professor Kelly DeVries writes in his book, "Joan of Arc, A Military Leader" (Sutton, 242 pages, $27.95), that the young 15th century woman from Lorraine who called herself Jehanne was "a soldier, plain and simple." She didn't mull over issues and strategy, from rear-area safety; she was in the forefront of battle, sword in hand and recognizable by her banner and doublet.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
J. Ernest Green's masterful conducting of the Annapolis Chorale, Chamber Orchestra and soloists in two performances of Richard Einhorn's "Voices of Light," an oratorio set to Carl Dreyer's 1928 silent film "The Passion of Joan of Arc," brought a unique experience to near-capacity audiences last weekend at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Having heard Einhorn's 1994 work in Green's January 1999 regional premiere, and again this March when Marin Alsop conducted it with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Baltimore Choral Arts Society at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, I was aware of its relevance and profound emotional impact.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 28, 2005
The best opera about the sainted medieval peasant girl who saved France didn't make a sound. That would be Carl Dreyer's 1928 silent film, The Passion of Joan of Arc, which couldn't be more operatic in its theatrical weight or intensity of expression. Verdi and Tchaikovsky tried hard to give Joan the opera she deserved; both came up short. Tchaikovsky's The Maid of Orleans has suffered a particularly bad rap. Although an initial success in St. Petersburg in 1881, it sank quickly, considered by many to be a drama-dead libretto (the composer's own)
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 1999
In its premier performance in the Baltimore-Washington region, "Voices of Light," directed by J. Ernest Green, will be presented Saturday by the Annapolis Chorale with the composer, Richard Einhorn, attending.The chorale will perform the oratorio as the composer intended, as an accompaniment to the screening of Carl Dreyer's 1928 silent film "The Passion of Joan of Arc."It seems appropriate that the Annapolis Chorale should introduce this work here, because it seems to be the only group of musicians dedicated to bringing new music to Annapolis.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 15, 1999
She's an illiterate teen-age runaway who hears voices and has visions. She also has a lot of unresolved gender issues.Sounds like just the gal I want leading my troops into battle against a British occupying army.But there you are. She did all right for the French some 550 years ago -- before getting burned at the stake, that is. The French handed over control of the military to 16-year-old Joan d'Arc, a peasant girl who claimed to be in constant conversation with a couple of Catholic saints, and, what do you know, a few years later, the British are gone and France is reunited.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2004
Talk about twists of fate. A stunning silent film portraying Joan of Arc's horrific trial and burning at the stake is released in 1928. Not long afterward, the original negative is lost in a warehouse fire, along with what are presumed to be the only copies. The director reconstructs the film using outtakes that survived. That painstakingly resurrected version also burns up in a warehouse fire. In 1981, an almost pristine print of the original is found - in the janitor's closet of a mental hospital in Norway.
NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
Fifty years have passed since St. Joan of Arc Catholic School opened its doors in Aberdeen, and this year, the little school is finding good reasons to be proud of its progress. Harry and Barbara Webster of Aberdeen, Eucharistic ministers and volunteers to the church and school, have had seven children and 13 grandchildren attend St. Joan of Arc. The children received quality schooling, Harry Webster said, while establishing Christian values. "The children not only get an education but also maintain their faith," he said.
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By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2001
GETTYSBURG, Pa.- Though it would be nearly sixty years before women won the right to vote, Republicans chose Civil War orator and abolitionist Anna Dickinson to tour the country and speak on their behalf in 1863. Despite her fame - after the Civil War, she earned more money per talk than Mark Twain - few today know much about Dickinson, who was once known as "America's Joan of Arc." "Anna Dickinson was compared to Joan of Arc because she was young, charismatic and combative, and came out of nowhere," according to Gettysburg College professor Matt Gallman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
At the age of 16, a French villager named Jeanne d'Arc responded to what she said were the voices of saints, exhorting her to take up arms against English invaders. Dressed in male clothing, she led troops to victory in battle after battle before being captured when she was 19. Jeanne heard voices again soon enough, but these were decidedly human ones, some mocking her and others praying for her as she slowly burned to death at the stake during a brutal execution carried out 580 years ago. This week, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presents its first performance of a 1938 oratorio commemorating the woman whose faith, vision and bravery would eventually earn her sainthood.
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By [LORI SEARS] | January 14, 2007
Medieval family day Celebrate the life and legacy of French heroine Joan of Arc at the Medieval Merriment Family Day and Open House on Saturday at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington. Visitors can step inside the world of medieval Europe at the all-day event, presented as part of the Joan of Arc exhibit, which runs through Jan. 21. Dancing, storytelling, magic shows, musical performances, art-making workshops, gallery talks and more will be part of the merry celebration honoring the woman who led the French army to victory against England in the 15th century.
NEWS
May 29, 2005
JOHN CARROLL HINDER, SR., of Aberdeen, Maryland, died May 26. He was 77. Born in Aberdeen, he was the son of Frederick C. and Helen Kelly Hinder. John Hinder was married to the love of his life Carolyn Mildred Lindenstruth. He was a devoted and loving husband, father, and grandfather. Mr. Hinder was a family man. In 1948 with his father and brother, Joseph Hinder, he founded Hinder Motors, Inc. In 1961 Hinder Ford was established. He continued working in the dealership until his sons took over the business.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 28, 2005
The best opera about the sainted medieval peasant girl who saved France didn't make a sound. That would be Carl Dreyer's 1928 silent film, The Passion of Joan of Arc, which couldn't be more operatic in its theatrical weight or intensity of expression. Verdi and Tchaikovsky tried hard to give Joan the opera she deserved; both came up short. Tchaikovsky's The Maid of Orleans has suffered a particularly bad rap. Although an initial success in St. Petersburg in 1881, it sank quickly, considered by many to be a drama-dead libretto (the composer's own)
NEWS
November 24, 2004
On November 22, 2004, TONY C. PARROTTA, beloved husband of Mary Celine Parrotta (nee Armburger), devoted father of two children. He was an active member of St. Joan of Arc Catholic Parish and active in the Maryland, Delaware, DC Elks Association. Friends and family may call on Thursday, 7 to 9 P.M. and Friday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 at the Tarring Cargo Funeral Home, P.A., 333 S. Parke St., Aberdeen, MD, 21001. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church on Saturday, November 27, at 10 A.M. Interment Mt. Erin Cemetery.
NEWS
September 29, 2004
On September 25, 2004 Joseph F. Hinder Sr., beloved husband of E. Joyce Hinder (nee Yingling), loving father to Joseph F. Hinder, Jr. and his wife Barbara Hinder, Fred C. Hinder and his wife Sally Hinder, Kelly M. Hinder and his wife Suzanne Hinder, Keith O. Hinder Sr., and his wife Beth Muller-Hinder and William K. Hinder and his wife Kathy Hinder. Devoted grandfather to 12 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. In 1948, Joe with his father Fred and brother John, founded Hinder Motors, Inc., a Lincoln-Mercury dealership located in Aberdeen, MD. Friends may call the Tarring-Cargo Funeral Home, P.A., 333 South Parke Street, Aberdeen, MD 21001, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 2002
An oratorio written to accompany a film about a saint provided a gripping experience for a capacity audience Saturday when J. Ernest Green and the Annapolis Chorale, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and soloists brought Richard Einhorn's Voices of Light and Carl Dreyer's film The Passion of Joan of Arc to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Einhorn's contemporary minimalist music illuminates Dreyer's 1928 film in telling the story of a teen-age peasant girl who helped crown a king and won military victories by obeying the voices of saints directing her. These are the "voices of light" in Einhorn's work.
NEWS
November 24, 2004
On November 22, 2004, TONY C. PARROTTA, beloved husband of Mary Celine Parrotta (nee Armburger), devoted father of two children. He was an active member of St. Joan of Arc Catholic Parish and active in the Maryland, Delaware, DC Elks Association. Friends and family may call on Thursday, 7 to 9 P.M. and Friday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 at the Tarring Cargo Funeral Home, P.A., 333 S. Parke St., Aberdeen, MD, 21001. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church on Saturday, November 27, at 10 A.M. Interment Mt. Erin Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 25, 2004
Every so often, one great work of art inspires another great work of art. Shakespeare's Othello and Verdi's Otello, for example. Or Carl Dreyer's stunning silent film The Passion of Joan of Arc and Richard Einhorn's mesmerizing oratorio Voices of Light. The Baltimore Choral Arts Society brought that movie and that music together at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Sunday night and produced one of the season's most memorable experiences. Einhorn's 1995 score, an exquisite mix of medievalism and minimalism, is not a frame-by-frame match for Dreyer's 1928 classic.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 21, 2004
Carl Theodor Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc is, simply stated, one of the most striking, passionate and vivid films ever made, a study in the use of close-ups and in the filming of naked emotion that has lost none of its impact over the eight decades since its release. Seeing this amazing film in any incarnation is extraordinary enough, but Baltimore cinephiles should consider themselves blessed this weekend. Sunday at the Meyerhoff, Dreyer's stark masterpiece will be shown in a print that is reportedly as close as we can get nowadays to what the director originally had in mind (the original negative was destroyed in a fire, causing Dreyer to reconstruct the film using alternate takes; that version - which will be shown Sunday - was denounced by both the French and British, and subsequently altered)
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