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By DIANE COLE and DIANE COLE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
The Year of Magical Thinking Joan Didion Alfred A. Knopf / 219 pages. The acclaimed essayist Joan Didion chose a title at once misleading and precisely apt for her extraordinary memoir of loss, The Year of Magical Thinking. No, this is not a book about sorcerers aimed at the Harry Potter set. But it does have very much to do with a particular fantasy that is especially widespread among those recently bereaved: that if only we could turn back the clock, undo some hitherto unseen, fatal flaw, we could make our dead return to the living, and to us. The moment Didion seeks to isolate - and retract - was the evening of Dec. 30, 2003.
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NEWS
February 18, 2007
The Year of Magical Thinking By Joan Didion In this taut, clear-eyed memoir of grief, Didion chronicles the year following the death of her husband, fellow writer John Gregory Dunne, from a massive heart attack on Dec. 30, 2003, while the couple's only daughter, Quintana, lay unconscious in a nearby hospital suffering from pneumonia and septic shock. Dunne and Didion had lived and worked side by side for nearly 40 years, and Dunne's death propelled Didion into a state she calls "magical thinking."
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NEWS
December 25, 2005
Fiction At First Sight By Nicolas Sparks Blue Smoke By Nora Roberts Camel Club By David Baldacci Predator By Patricia Cornwell A Wedding in December By Anita Shreve Nonfiction The City of Falling Angels By John Berendt Healthy Aging: A Lifelong Guide to Your Physical and Spiritual Well-Being By Andrew Weil A Million Little Pieces By James Frey Teacher Man By Frank McCourt The Year of Magical Thinking By Joan Didion Now in Paperback ...
NEWS
December 25, 2005
Fiction At First Sight By Nicolas Sparks Blue Smoke By Nora Roberts Camel Club By David Baldacci Predator By Patricia Cornwell A Wedding in December By Anita Shreve Nonfiction The City of Falling Angels By John Berendt Healthy Aging: A Lifelong Guide to Your Physical and Spiritual Well-Being By Andrew Weil A Million Little Pieces By James Frey Teacher Man By Frank McCourt The Year of Magical Thinking By Joan Didion Now in Paperback ...
NEWS
February 18, 2007
The Year of Magical Thinking By Joan Didion In this taut, clear-eyed memoir of grief, Didion chronicles the year following the death of her husband, fellow writer John Gregory Dunne, from a massive heart attack on Dec. 30, 2003, while the couple's only daughter, Quintana, lay unconscious in a nearby hospital suffering from pneumonia and septic shock. Dunne and Didion had lived and worked side by side for nearly 40 years, and Dunne's death propelled Didion into a state she calls "magical thinking."
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
The personal essay, like so many of this world's good things, is peculiarly resistant to pigeonholing. It is not autobiography, reportage or criticism, though it may closely resemble any of these, and sometimes even all three at once. Its subject matter can range from the sublime (Michel de Montaigne's "On Some Verses of Virgil") to the seemingly trivial (G. K. Chesterton's "On Running After One's Hat"). Invented by the Romans, perfected by a Frenchman and churned out in awe-inspiring quantities by the English, it has long since become the characteristic mode of American literary expression - yet American publishers are still notoriously reluctant to bring out essay collections, reflexively citing the conventional wisdom that "essays don't sell" (by which is meant that they don't sell as well as, say, John Grisham's latest novel)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Where I Was From, by Joan Didion. Knopf. 226 pages. $23. Joan Didion was just out of Berkeley when she won a writing contest and came East to New York to work for Vogue magazine. Lonely and broke, she sat on one chair and put her typewriter on the seat of another in her sparsely furnished room and wrote a fictional account of California's history. Run River was a valentine to her native state, and it soothed her homesickness. Forty years later, the author known for her stylized language, as well as her unstinting observations, returns to California's history and the squinting-into-the-sun version of that history that its natives share in Where I Was From.
NEWS
By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 1996
"The Last Thing He Wanted: A Novel," by Joan Didion. Knopf. 240 pages. $23.To overgeneralize, contemporary American fiction tends to be apolitical; there seem to be few literary novelists, and even fewer women among them, who will confidently tackle conflicts more global than domestic. So it is a good thing to have a Joan Didion, one of America's most acclaimed essayists and novelists, whose novels bring an investigative reporter's eye and sensibility to fiction about the wider world."The Last Thing He Wanted," her first novel in 12 years, is set in the year of Orwell's "1984," but from the perspective of hindsight rather than prophecy.
NEWS
By MYRON BECKENSTEIN Title: "Maiden Voyages: The Writings of Women Travelers" Editor: Mary Morris Publisher: Vintage Length, price: 439 pages, $14 (paperback) and MYRON BECKENSTEIN Title: "Maiden Voyages: The Writings of Women Travelers" Editor: Mary Morris Publisher: Vintage Length, price: 439 pages, $14 (paperback),LOS ANGELES TIMES Title: "Death of the Office Witch" Author: Marlys Millhiser Publisher: Otto Penzler/Macmillan Length, price: 289 pages, $20 | January 30, 1994
Title: "Memoirs"Author: Pierre Elliott TrudeauPublisher: McClelland & StewartLength, price: 381 pages, $29.95 The memoirs of this charismatic, dapper Canadian leader unfortunately look like a coffeetable auto-paean. Because this is bigger than the average book, heavier than the average book, printed on much better paper than the average book and with lots of pictures ("253 photographs, 106 in full color"), almost all of the author, a reader can be excused for thinking the book is meant to be displayed and leafed quickly through, not read.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
What was the hardest lesson you've learned so far? "Hire professionals for home improvement projects. I thought installing a patio in my backyard would be a fun DIY project. That was an expensive and painful lesson. On the upside, I now own a tamper. " What's a fact about yourself that will surprise people? "I'm a secret slob. I keep my professional life super organized with color-coded calendars and everything, but my room and car are always a mess. I have dry-cleaning from three months ago in my trunk.
NEWS
By DIANE COLE and DIANE COLE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
The Year of Magical Thinking Joan Didion Alfred A. Knopf / 219 pages. The acclaimed essayist Joan Didion chose a title at once misleading and precisely apt for her extraordinary memoir of loss, The Year of Magical Thinking. No, this is not a book about sorcerers aimed at the Harry Potter set. But it does have very much to do with a particular fantasy that is especially widespread among those recently bereaved: that if only we could turn back the clock, undo some hitherto unseen, fatal flaw, we could make our dead return to the living, and to us. The moment Didion seeks to isolate - and retract - was the evening of Dec. 30, 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Where I Was From, by Joan Didion. Knopf. 226 pages. $23. Joan Didion was just out of Berkeley when she won a writing contest and came East to New York to work for Vogue magazine. Lonely and broke, she sat on one chair and put her typewriter on the seat of another in her sparsely furnished room and wrote a fictional account of California's history. Run River was a valentine to her native state, and it soothed her homesickness. Forty years later, the author known for her stylized language, as well as her unstinting observations, returns to California's history and the squinting-into-the-sun version of that history that its natives share in Where I Was From.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
The personal essay, like so many of this world's good things, is peculiarly resistant to pigeonholing. It is not autobiography, reportage or criticism, though it may closely resemble any of these, and sometimes even all three at once. Its subject matter can range from the sublime (Michel de Montaigne's "On Some Verses of Virgil") to the seemingly trivial (G. K. Chesterton's "On Running After One's Hat"). Invented by the Romans, perfected by a Frenchman and churned out in awe-inspiring quantities by the English, it has long since become the characteristic mode of American literary expression - yet American publishers are still notoriously reluctant to bring out essay collections, reflexively citing the conventional wisdom that "essays don't sell" (by which is meant that they don't sell as well as, say, John Grisham's latest novel)
NEWS
By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 1996
"The Last Thing He Wanted: A Novel," by Joan Didion. Knopf. 240 pages. $23.To overgeneralize, contemporary American fiction tends to be apolitical; there seem to be few literary novelists, and even fewer women among them, who will confidently tackle conflicts more global than domestic. So it is a good thing to have a Joan Didion, one of America's most acclaimed essayists and novelists, whose novels bring an investigative reporter's eye and sensibility to fiction about the wider world."The Last Thing He Wanted," her first novel in 12 years, is set in the year of Orwell's "1984," but from the perspective of hindsight rather than prophecy.
NEWS
By MYRON BECKENSTEIN Title: "Maiden Voyages: The Writings of Women Travelers" Editor: Mary Morris Publisher: Vintage Length, price: 439 pages, $14 (paperback) and MYRON BECKENSTEIN Title: "Maiden Voyages: The Writings of Women Travelers" Editor: Mary Morris Publisher: Vintage Length, price: 439 pages, $14 (paperback),LOS ANGELES TIMES Title: "Death of the Office Witch" Author: Marlys Millhiser Publisher: Otto Penzler/Macmillan Length, price: 289 pages, $20 | January 30, 1994
Title: "Memoirs"Author: Pierre Elliott TrudeauPublisher: McClelland & StewartLength, price: 381 pages, $29.95 The memoirs of this charismatic, dapper Canadian leader unfortunately look like a coffeetable auto-paean. Because this is bigger than the average book, heavier than the average book, printed on much better paper than the average book and with lots of pictures ("253 photographs, 106 in full color"), almost all of the author, a reader can be excused for thinking the book is meant to be displayed and leafed quickly through, not read.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 14, 1992
Though its ostensible setting is Key West, the new Goldie Hawn film "Crisscross" really takes place on the isle of moral torpor, in the entropy straits, halfway between being and nothingness, near the tropic of lassitude. This is Joan Didion territory, it's Robert Stone territory -- but it sure isn't Goldie Hawn territory.Hawn plays the stressed-out divorcee of a naval aviator and Skyhawk jock who accidentally planted a 500-pounder in a children's hospital over in 'Nam. Like a plague spreading through the air, the miasma of this original sin infects all who come in touch, particularly the beaten-down Hawn and her somewhat drab son, Chris (David Arnott)
NEWS
December 11, 2005
BEST-SELLERS FICTION NoLWTitle AuthorWeeks on List 1(1)Mary, Mary James Patterson3 2(3)At First Sight Nicholas Sparks7 3(2)Light from Heaven Jan Karon4 4(6)The Lighthouse P.D. James2 5(-)Forever Odd Dean Koontz1 6(4)The Camel Club David Baldacci6 7(5)Predator Patricia Cornwell6 8(9)Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt Anne Rice5 9(7)Star Wars: Dark Lord-The Rise of Darth Vader James Luciano2 10(11)The Da Vinci Code Dan Brown140 NONFICTION NoLWTitle AuthorWeeks on List 1(2)Teacher Man Frank McCourt3 2(3)
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