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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
As a dance historian, Chrystelle Trump Bond understands that nearly every war has its footwork. During the American Revolution: "We danced like crazy, she says. And during the Civil War: "Dancing didn't stop."World War II was no exception. Big band swing music brought the war effort to the dance floor, where it literally became a patriotic duty to do the jitterbug.Tomorrow at the Maryland Historical Society, Ms. Bond, chairman of the Goucher College dance department, will talk about jitterbugging in the 38 United Service Organizations'(USO)
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SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | December 3, 2007
Replay Navy slotback Reggie Campbell returned a kickoff 98 yards for a touchdown - setting a school record and tying an Army-Navy game record - to answer Army's only score and give the Midshipmen a 14-3 lead. The return gave fans a clear look at Campbell's jitterbug running ability and at the great blocking he got from the Mids' special teams. Erase Though the Mids accumulated 38 points, the Navy offense never really got going. Navy scored on only one drive of more than four plays and capitalized on great field position provided by its improving defense, which had its best game of the season.
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NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2007
James Ray Sebring Sr., an engineer who designed radio communications hardware for the Apollo space program, died Dec. 22 of an infection at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 73 and lived in Sparks. Born in Cherry Tree, Pa., Mr. Sebring attended public schools and served in the Navy as a radioman from 1951 to 1955. While studying for an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering at Pennsylvania State University, he met Anna Marie DeMay at a Sunday afternoon dance. After dating for two years, the couple married in 1959, two weeks after Mr. Sebring earned his bachelor's degree.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2007
James Ray Sebring Sr., an engineer who designed radio communications hardware for the Apollo space program, died Dec. 22 of an infection at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 73 and lived in Sparks. Born in Cherry Tree, Pa., Mr. Sebring attended public schools and served in the Navy as a radioman from 1951 to 1955. While studying for an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering at Pennsylvania State University, he met Anna Marie DeMay at a Sunday afternoon dance. After dating for two years, the couple married in 1959, two weeks after Mr. Sebring earned his bachelor's degree.
NEWS
January 31, 1994
"A DANCE craze hit America during the late 1930s and early 1940s," according to Goucher dance professor Chrystelle Trump Bond, writing in the current issue of the Maryland Historical Magazine. And what were local folks dancing during World War II?"Most popular of all was the jitterbug. Despite segregation in the armed forces, defense plants, and the USO, young Americans regardless of gender, race, or class danced the African-based movements of the jitterbug."Incorporating steps from African-American dances like the Lindy hop, boogie woogie, shag, trucking, Charleston, Susie-Q, Shorty-George, and camel walk, jitterbuggers pulsated to syncopated rhythms, especially when dancing to music of the Benny Goodman Orchestra featuring the thrilling drums of Gene Krupa.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | December 3, 2007
Replay Navy slotback Reggie Campbell returned a kickoff 98 yards for a touchdown - setting a school record and tying an Army-Navy game record - to answer Army's only score and give the Midshipmen a 14-3 lead. The return gave fans a clear look at Campbell's jitterbug running ability and at the great blocking he got from the Mids' special teams. Erase Though the Mids accumulated 38 points, the Navy offense never really got going. Navy scored on only one drive of more than four plays and capitalized on great field position provided by its improving defense, which had its best game of the season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Virginia Geckler and John Coffren | June 4, 1998
Highland FestivalExperience the passion and pride of the Scottish heritage at the 11th annual McHenry Highland Festival Saturday at the Garrett County Fairgrounds. The aggression provoked by competition and the reflection inspired by period music stand in stark contrast in this rich culture. Watch a clans-and-tartans parade, military units, amateur solo piping and highland dance competitions as well as sheep-dog exhibitions by William Crowe. Participate in athletic contests, races and games.
FEATURES
By J.Wynn Rousuck | July 21, 1991
'Wizard of Oz' will mark Theatre on the Hill's 10th seasonAs part of its 10th anniversary summer season, Theatre on the Hill will present "The Wizard of Oz" for three weekends beginning Friday. Curtain times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 ++ p.m., with matinees Aug. 3 and 10 at 2 p.m., in the Alumni Hall Theatre at Western Maryland College in Westminster. Tickets are $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for children.According to co-director Ira Domser, the production combines material from the L. Frank Baum novel and the 1939 movie musical, and it also features a number -- "The Jitterbug" -- that was cut from the movie.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2003
They danced the jitterbug and sang the songs of Glenn Miller. They re-enacted the dinner conversation of a food-rationing, SPAM-eating family of the 1940s. And they tested the fitness of the men in the audience as prospective U.S. soldiers. "Congratulations, you're now eligible to fight for our country," 10-year-old Cody Coon declared after the men successfully marched, read from a chart of poster-sized letters and jumped when they heard three cymbal clashes. "Uncle Sam wants you, you, you!"
NEWS
By Jeff Holland and Jeff Holland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 1999
ABOUT A YEAR AGO, I was privileged to be among the band of loonies who staged a mock revolution and formed the fictitious Maritime Republic of Eastport (MRE).Our goal was to raise a big enough ruckus to make people wonder what the fun was all about so they would come and keep the local businesses going while the bridge connecting the Eastport peninsula to Annapolis proper was closed for repairs.Nobody could have anticipated the incredible response that weekend and the rest of the year. Most of the Eastport restaurants did better during the three weeks the bridge was closed than they had done the year before.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2003
They danced the jitterbug and sang the songs of Glenn Miller. They re-enacted the dinner conversation of a food-rationing, SPAM-eating family of the 1940s. And they tested the fitness of the men in the audience as prospective U.S. soldiers. "Congratulations, you're now eligible to fight for our country," 10-year-old Cody Coon declared after the men successfully marched, read from a chart of poster-sized letters and jumped when they heard three cymbal clashes. "Uncle Sam wants you, you, you!"
NEWS
By Jeff Holland and Jeff Holland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 1999
ABOUT A YEAR AGO, I was privileged to be among the band of loonies who staged a mock revolution and formed the fictitious Maritime Republic of Eastport (MRE).Our goal was to raise a big enough ruckus to make people wonder what the fun was all about so they would come and keep the local businesses going while the bridge connecting the Eastport peninsula to Annapolis proper was closed for repairs.Nobody could have anticipated the incredible response that weekend and the rest of the year. Most of the Eastport restaurants did better during the three weeks the bridge was closed than they had done the year before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Virginia Geckler and John Coffren | June 4, 1998
Highland FestivalExperience the passion and pride of the Scottish heritage at the 11th annual McHenry Highland Festival Saturday at the Garrett County Fairgrounds. The aggression provoked by competition and the reflection inspired by period music stand in stark contrast in this rich culture. Watch a clans-and-tartans parade, military units, amateur solo piping and highland dance competitions as well as sheep-dog exhibitions by William Crowe. Participate in athletic contests, races and games.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1996
Helen Costantini looks around the restaurant table and sees six decades of wienie roasts and skating parties and hayrides, memories of Christmas dinners and summer dances shared with women she has known from social studies through Social Security.Costantini sees the faces of her beloved Milburnettes, an East Baltimore girls club celebrating its 60th anniversary this fall.And after all those years -- more than 1,000 meetings spanning the Great Depression to the discovery of life on Mars -- the girls are still learning things about each other.
NEWS
January 31, 1994
"A DANCE craze hit America during the late 1930s and early 1940s," according to Goucher dance professor Chrystelle Trump Bond, writing in the current issue of the Maryland Historical Magazine. And what were local folks dancing during World War II?"Most popular of all was the jitterbug. Despite segregation in the armed forces, defense plants, and the USO, young Americans regardless of gender, race, or class danced the African-based movements of the jitterbug."Incorporating steps from African-American dances like the Lindy hop, boogie woogie, shag, trucking, Charleston, Susie-Q, Shorty-George, and camel walk, jitterbuggers pulsated to syncopated rhythms, especially when dancing to music of the Benny Goodman Orchestra featuring the thrilling drums of Gene Krupa.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
James Dean could have stepped onto the Severna Park High School stage this week, and nobody would have been too surprised.As the school's fourth Rock and Roll Revival show neared tomorrow's scheduled opening, practices seemed more and more like the real thing. For hours Tuesday night, more than 100 students be-bopped and jitterbugged and swayed to the rhythms of the 1950s and '60s, complete with poodle skirts and slicked back hair."People get to feel like they're in another era, and it's so much fun," said Tara Jewett, 15, one of two student directors.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
James Dean could have stepped onto the Severna Park High School stage this week, and nobody would have been too surprised.As the school's fourth Rock and Roll Revival show neared tomorrow's scheduled opening, practices seemed more and more like the real thing. For hours Tuesday night, more than 100 students be-bopped and jitterbugged and swayed to the rhythms of the 1950s and '60s, complete with poodle skirts and slicked back hair."People get to feel like they're in another era, and it's so much fun," said Tara Jewett, 15, one of two student directors.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1996
Helen Costantini looks around the restaurant table and sees six decades of wienie roasts and skating parties and hayrides, memories of Christmas dinners and summer dances shared with women she has known from social studies through Social Security.Costantini sees the faces of her beloved Milburnettes, an East Baltimore girls club celebrating its 60th anniversary this fall.And after all those years -- more than 1,000 meetings spanning the Great Depression to the discovery of life on Mars -- the girls are still learning things about each other.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
As a dance historian, Chrystelle Trump Bond understands that nearly every war has its footwork. During the American Revolution: "We danced like crazy, she says. And during the Civil War: "Dancing didn't stop."World War II was no exception. Big band swing music brought the war effort to the dance floor, where it literally became a patriotic duty to do the jitterbug.Tomorrow at the Maryland Historical Society, Ms. Bond, chairman of the Goucher College dance department, will talk about jitterbugging in the 38 United Service Organizations'(USO)
FEATURES
By J.Wynn Rousuck | July 21, 1991
'Wizard of Oz' will mark Theatre on the Hill's 10th seasonAs part of its 10th anniversary summer season, Theatre on the Hill will present "The Wizard of Oz" for three weekends beginning Friday. Curtain times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 ++ p.m., with matinees Aug. 3 and 10 at 2 p.m., in the Alumni Hall Theatre at Western Maryland College in Westminster. Tickets are $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for children.According to co-director Ira Domser, the production combines material from the L. Frank Baum novel and the 1939 movie musical, and it also features a number -- "The Jitterbug" -- that was cut from the movie.
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